Learning & Teaching Enhancement
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Blended Learning Coordinators: Professional Learning Dayhttp://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8995Blended Learning Coordinators: Professional Learning DayElzette le Roux<p>​The bi-annual CLT Blended Learning Coordinators (BLC) Professional Learning Day took place at STIAS on 9 March 2022. With many of the colleagues meeting each other face-to-face for the first time this year, fruitful conversations and ideas were shared all around. <br></p><p>After introductions, Dr Antoinette van der Merwe, Senior Director at the Division for Learning and Teaching Enhancement (DLTE), shared strategic institutional and divisional priorities for the year. Not only are six of the seven identified game changers of the university for this year within the DLTE, but does at least four of these have a direct impact on the work and support provided by the BLCs in the faculties. These include programme renewal, assessment and to an extent hybrid learning and digital transformation. </p><p>A virtual visit from Lars Willner, the CEO of a small Norwegian company called <a href="https://join.differ.chat/community/d6f5c656-95c6-4193-9ff2-f6183b704106/BTLYMP">Differ.Chat</a>, followed Dr Van der Merwe's session. Lars is also coordinating an <a href="https://www.edubots.eu/">Edubots</a> project that consist of a learning community who explores the best practice use of chatbots in higher education with the goal of improving educational attainment. Lars provided some context and background to the project whereafter the possibilities of incorporating artificial intelligence, in the form of Edubots, in teaching and learning and/or student support at SU were discussed amongst the colleagues. For more information and/or participation in the Edubots project, contact <a href="mailto:lzleroux@sun.ac.za">Elzette le Roux</a>, Advisor: Online Learning, at the Centre for Learning Technologies (CLT).</p><p>After the tea break, <a href="mailto:sonjas@sun.ac.za">Dr Sonja Strydom</a>, Deputy-Director Academic Development and Research at the CLT, facilitated a session relating to the contextual scholarly pathway and continuous professional development (CPD) options for BLCs. Some of these options entail professional membership specific pertaining to digital and/or learning technology, publications, academic networking sites, strategic participation in social media platforms and engaging in relevant readings.  </p><p>The after-lunch session, facilitated by <a href="mailto:mdev@sun.ac.za">Magriet de Villiers</a>, Advisor: Learning Technologies at the CLT, was filled with fruitful discussions and sharing of faculty stories and focus group planning afterwards. Best practices were shared from the faculty stories and areas of collaboration between BLCs in different faculties were identified. BLC work in faculties include (but are not limited to) planning, inputs, incorporating digital learning technologies in the curriculum; facilitating workshops and/or in-faculty training sessions; assistance with various aspects on SUNLearn; facilitating teaching and learning HUBs in faculties; research and conceptualisation of gamification in teaching and learning.</p><p>For support and assistance relating to blended teaching and learning in your faculty, please contact your BLC. Herewith more information about the BLCs and their unique support and work in the different faculties. </p><table cellspacing="0" width="100%" class="ms-rteTable-default"><tbody><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default" style="width:25%;">Name</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default" style="width:25%;">Faculty</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default" style="width:25%;">Position<br></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default" style="width:25%;">Description</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:almac@sun.ac.za">Alma Coertzen</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Law</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Legal Education Designer<br></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Provides advice, support and administrative service to academic staff with respect to programme renewal initiatives, judicious use of technology and web-based resources in teaching, learning and assessment activities in legal education. Design, implement and administrate professional development short course learning programmes in the faculty. </td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:calitzr@sun.ac.za">Amanda Calitz</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Medicine and Health Sciences: Centre for Health Professions Education</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Advisor: Blended Learning & Simulations</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Work with subject matter experts to conceptualise, plan and design interactive instructional materials with the aim to integrate a blended learning approach and better facilitate teaching, learning and assessment at the FMHS. Support the clinical skills lab as well.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:brigittepegado@sun.ac.za">Brigitte Pegado</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Engineering</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Advisor: Blended Learning</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Learning technology specialist supporting lecturers, tutors and students by designing, providing and implementing pedagogically sound strategies relating to blended teaching, learning and assessment.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:deleciad@sun.ac.za">Delecia Davids</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Education</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Blended Learning Coordinator</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Provides technical and professional support to academics by assisting with and developing pedagogically sound strategies for online, hybrid, and blended teaching, learning and assessment initiatives.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:ilser@sun.ac.za">Dr Ilse Rootman-le Grange</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Science </td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">BLC: E-Learning Instructional Designer</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Provides support with general SUNLearn queries, SUNLearn training, programme renewal projects, hybrid module development, strategic discussions relating to teaching. learning and assessment projects. Performs research in science teaching, learning and assessment with a specific focus on learning technologies. Support with FINLO project developments and applications, SoTL abstract writing and presentation preparation, first year module coordinator.  </td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:foiretjr@sun.ac.za">Jaudon Foiret</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Medicine and Health Sciences: Centre for Health Professions Education</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Advisor: Blended Learning</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Work with subject matter experts to conceptualise, plan and design interactive instructional materials with the aim to integrate a blended learning approach and better facilitate teaching, learning and assessment at the FMHS. Assists in the curriculum renewal process for the MBChB programme.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:ebrits@sun.ac.za">Kanita Brits</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Medicine and Health Sciences: Centre for Health Professions Education</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Advisor: Blended Learning</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Work with subject matter experts to conceptualise, plan and design interactive instructional materials with the aim to integrate a blended learning approach and better facilitate teaching, learning and assessment at the FMHS.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:wirthk@sun.ac.za">Kathryn Wirth</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">AgriSciences</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Blended Learning Coordinator</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">General SunLearn support and training, development of blended learning and hybrid modes of delivery within academic programmes, coordinate and support programme renewal activities, and participate in strategic initiatives within the faculty.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:kristin@sun.ac.za">Kristin van der Merwe</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Military Science: Educational Technology Department</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Educational Technologist</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Provides support for staff and students with the Learning Management System, learning design, blended learning and digital learning in general. Facilitate a Computer Literacy course for Military College students, performs digital learning research and facilitate orientation programmes for students in the faculty.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:lennox@sun.ac.za">Lennox Olivier</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Arts and Social Sciences</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Advisor: Blended Learning</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Provides support for learning and teaching, with a focus on the use of learning technologies (including blended-, online- and hybrid learning), integration of learning technologies in programmes and modules and programme renewal activities. </td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:magdabarnard@sun.ac.za">Magda Barnard</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Economic and Management Sciences</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Programme Renewal Coordinator</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Supports and drives curriculum renewal on both module and programme level. This often entails the use of learning technologies.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:mvolschenk@sun.ac.za">Dr Mariette Volschenk</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Medicine and Health Sciences: Centre for Health Professions Education</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Lecturer & e-Learning Portfolio Manager</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Manages the learning technologies team at the Centre for Health Professions Education. Key focus areas include learning experience design on the online platform and postgraduate teaching and supervision (MPhil in HPE).</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:khozal@sun.ac.za">Dr Mhaka Khoza</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Military Science</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Educational Technologist</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Provides support for staff and students with the Learning Management System, learning design, blended learning and digital learning in general. Facilitate a Computer Literacy course for Military College students, performs digital learning research and facilitate orientation programmes for students in the faculty.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><a href="mailto:simbapondani@sun.ac.za">Simbarashe Pondani</a></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Theology</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Blended Learning Coordinator</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">Technical and SUNLearn support to staff and students relating to the use of learning technologies in teaching and learning. Technical support with the hybrid programme, provide support with online design and support programme renewal activities.<br><br></td></tr></tbody></table><p>​<br></p>
SU explains Language Policyhttp://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8862SU explains Language PolicyProf Deresh Ramjugernath: / Viserektor: Leer en Onderrig<p style="font-size:12pt;font-family:"times new roman", serif;margin-bottom:0px;color:black !important;background-color:white !important;"><span style="background-color:rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85);color:#444444;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;">This</span><span style="background-color:rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85);color:#444444;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> article was published on 14 December 2021 on Netwerk24. Click </span><a href="https://www.netwerk24.com/netwerk24/stemme/menings/us-verduidelik-taalbeleid-20211213" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable" data-linkindex="3" style="background-color:rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85);font:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">here</a><span style="background-color:rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85);color:#444444;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> to read the original in Afrikaans or read the English translation below.​</span><br></p><p style="font-size:12pt;font-family:"times new roman", serif;margin-bottom:0px;color:black !important;background-color:white !important;"><span style="background-color:rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85);color:#444444;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"><br></span></p><div><em>The revised Language Policy that was approved by Stellenbosch University's Council this month offers the opportunity of fostering a sense of cohesion on campus, writes Deresh Ramjugernath*.</em><br></div><div><em><br></em></div><p>Conversations about language at Stellenbosch University (SU) are often fiery. After all, language is part of our identity, our origin, and our culture, and plays a huge role in the way we make sense of the world around us.<br></p><p>At higher education institutions these issues are placed under a magnifying glass when young adults start grappling with life's core questions and start preparing themselves for professional work environments. So, how do you create an environment at a university in which appreciation for differences in culture and origin is celebrated, and where they are not regarded as obstacles?</p><p>This is exactly what SU wishes to achieve with its revised Language Policy. We would like to create a community on our campuses that is equipped to handle South Africa's needs, and to produce graduates who actively make a difference in society.</p><p><strong>A learning opportunity</strong></p><p><strong></strong>I came into contact with several languages throughout my professional life as an engineer and an academic in South Africa. In the mining industry, where I worked decades ago, a single language was out of the question. That is where I learnt to express myself in Afrikaans. Later in my career, at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, isiZulu was the language most spoken, followed by English. Through your subconscious mind you build a vocabulary stretching far beyond the boundaries of your first language.   </p><p>This year I commenced with Afrikaans lessons, and I plan to do the same with isiXhosa next year. One of the things we would like to encourage at SU by means of our Language Policy, is for people to learn more languages. By exclusively using your home language – even if it is English – you are missing out on an opportunity of a richer student experience.</p><p><strong>A multilingual mindset</strong></p><p>The application of our revised Language Policy (that comes into effect in January 2022) is multifaceted, but I would like to highlight a few key points.  </p><p>The policy provides for the use of Afrikaans, English and isiXhosa in learning and teaching at SU, as well as in our communication. It also specifies the extent to which each language should be used in various scenarios.</p><p>Afrikaans and English are designated as SU's primary languages of learning and teaching, but translanguaging in multiple languages is encouraged to support and enhance learning. IsiXhosa as an academic language will be given special attention with a view to introduce it into various disciplines incrementally, where reasonably practicable. SU contributes to the promotion of isiXhosa as an additional academic language through its own initiatives and in partnership with other universities and entities.</p><p>The Language Policy firstly focuses on the power of language to unite people. Secondly, it promotes equitable access and, thirdly, it supports student success. South Africans' knowledge and skills are highly valued internationally. Our multicultural and diverse backgrounds and our ability to make provision for different cultures contribute to this.</p><p>Through its Language Policy SU strives to foster an environment that embraces and values different cultures through language. We want students to be aware of the way in which they engage with language and to develop a multilingual mindset in their interactions with others.</p><p>There could be an expectation that the Language Policy should be a single road, with everyone driving at the same speed, hastily on their way to the ultimate destination. However, in practice it is a highway with several lanes where everyone uses different junctions, drives at their own speed, but are nevertheless on their way to a common destination.</p><p>A university community is a microcosm of society. Given South Africa's rich diversity, a policy that emphasises the importance of multilingualism should support and promote social cohesion.</p><p><strong>What about Afrikaans?</strong></p><p>Our Language Policy strives to make everyone who works and studies at SU feel welcome and included. This also holds true for students, colleagues and visitors who speak Afrikaans.</p><p>SU has previously been accused of wanting to be exclusively English and of actively trying to reduce the use of Afrikaans. That is simply untrue.</p><p>I appreciate and understand the fears of the Afrikaans speaking community and their concern that a specific identity and culture will become extinct if Afrikaans is taken out of the picture. However, our Language Policy specifically creates the space for the preservation and continuous use of Afrikaans.</p><p>In the long term, the active creation of a multilingual environment in which all students and personnel use and appreciate several languages, will promote the sustainability of those languages.</p><p><strong>How was the policy drawn up?</strong></p><p>SU's Language Policy must be revised every five years. During the year-long revision process of the previous Language Policy (2016), the task team consulted widely. There were two rounds of public participation and inputs, and the task team considered all comments. </p><p>The task team responsible for the revision process was made up of representatives of all ten SU's faculties and its professional and administrative support services, as well as student representatives, with technical experts co-opted as necessary. They met 24 times. Internal SU bodies – including the Institutional Forum, Senate and Council – were consulted three times and all inputs continuously informed the policy. </p><p><strong>Growing pains and challenges</strong></p><p>Language policies go hand in hand with growing pains and challenges, but systems are available to cope with such challenges. The Language Policy provides for mechanisms to ensure academic supervision, effective management and proper review management regarding language implementation.</p><p>This takes place within a framework that enables faculties to formulate language implementation policies and develop procedures for accountability and reporting to relevant structures. </p><p>SU's Language Centre provides support, and the policy also describes reporting, monitoring and conflict resolution mechanisms, including complaint procedures.</p><p>An important question remains: How do we build a better society in which students look at each other and the world in a new light and ultimately create a better South Africa and a better world?</p><p>I believe SU's new Language Policy indicates the right direction to help realise this goal.</p><p> <em>*Prof Deresh Ramjugernath is </em><em>Deputy Vice-Chancellor: Learning and Teaching</em><em> at Stellenbosch University.​</em></p><p><em>This article appeared on Netwerk24.</em></p>
Encouraging Engagement with the SU Assessment Policyhttp://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8929Encouraging Engagement with the SU Assessment PolicyAnthea H M Jacobs <p>​<br><br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">The <a href="http://sunrecords.sun.ac.za/controlled/C4%20Policies%20and%20Regulations/SU%20Assessment%20Policy_FINAL.pdf" target="_blank"> <span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-9-5"> <strong>SU Assessment Policy</strong></span></a> was approved in 2021 and the Division for Learning and Teaching Enhancement (DLTE) identified the need to reflect on it to support the implementation of the policy in collaboration with faculties. Assessment has been identified on institutional level as one of the seven game changers for 2022 and DLTE's “Assessment matters" institutional project was also successful in obtaining strategic funding for 2022-2024. It was therefore necessary for all staff members to be familiar with the assessment policy and be aware of the role each centre could potentially play in the support and implementation thereof. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">A workshop to this effect was held on Thursday, 24 February 2022, on MS Teams. The main aim of the workshop was for the DLTE to have a clear picture of the roll out plan for the SU Assessment Policy. The great value of the workshop lay in pulling together the work done by the different centres in the DLTE, demonstrating collaborative thinking and synergy. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">Workshop participants discussed the purposes and principles of assessment in breakaway groups. This was followed by different inputs by:</p><ul><li>The Centre for Academic Planning and Quality Assurance (APQ) focused on how a culture of quality assurance and enhancement in terms of assessment practices in academic departments can be established.</li><li>The Centre for Learning Technologies (CLT) focused on an overview of the learning technology to support e-assessments aligned with the policy and how to think about an approach thereto.</li><li>The Language Centre The LC highlighted four aspects, namely how the Reading Lab assists students with reading challenges when it comes to the allocation of extra time in exams and tests; the support that is offered by LC staff for assessing deaf students; how test and exam translation establishes reliability and integrity in ensuring 'consistency of measurement'; and how the teaching arm of the LC, particularly the Academic Literacies and Professional Communication modules approach assessment.</li><li>The Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) demonstrated its collaboration with faculties and other role players through, for example, the assessment short course, workshops, and research. </li></ul><p>Dr Antoinette van der Merwe, Senior Director, DLTE, summarised all the discussion points and pulled together different synergies. She used these to plot the way forward for promoting engagement with the SU Assessment Policy (2021), including further development of the Policy <a href="/english/learning-teaching/ctl/Documents/Assessment%20Policy%20Infographic.pdf" target="_blank"> <span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-9-5"> <strong>Infographic</strong></span>​</a>, as well as the DLTE collaborative research project, “Assessment matters: Re-imagining assessment culture and <span style="text-align:justify;">practices for a transformative student experience".</span></p><p>​<br></p>
SU Council approves new language policyhttp://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8799SU Council approves new language policyStellenbosch University/ Universiteit Stellenbosch​​​​​The Council of Stellenbosch University (SU) today (2 December 2021) approved the proposed new Language Policy for the institution with an overwhelming majority. This marks the end of a thorough, comprehensive and consultative revision process that started in October 2020. The 2021 revision forms part of a five-year revision cycle prescribed by the policy itself.<br><br><em>(</em><a href="/english/Pages/Language.aspx"><em class="ms-rteForeColor-1"><strong>Click here</strong></em></a><em> for more information, </em><a href="/english/Documents/Language/Final_Language%20policy%20infographic%20English.pdf"><em class="ms-rteForeColor-1"><strong>here for an infographic</strong></em></a><em> and </em><a href="/english/Documents/Language/Final%20Draft%20of%20the%20Language%20Policy%2012%20October%202021.pdf"><em class="ms-rteForeColor-1"><strong>here for the policy</strong></em></a><em> itself.) </em><div><br>On 26 November 2021, Senate approved the final draft of the Language Policy (2021) by an overwhelming majority, and recommended the document to Council. According to the Higher Education Act and the SU Statute, the Language Policy is the only policy to be approved by Council with the concurrence of Senate. Two weeks earlier, the Institutional Forum (IF) also adopted the final draft, and recommended it to Council.<br><br>“The revised Language Policy reaffirms that Stellenbosch University is a national asset in a diverse society,” said Council chair Mr George Steyn. “Without losing sight of the fact that SU also serves continental and global communities, the University recommits itself to multilingualism by using the three official languages of the Western Cape, namely <strong class="ms-rteForeColor-1">Afrikaans, English and isiXhosa</strong><span class="ms-rteForeColor-1">.</span> This unlocks the intellectual wealth inherent in our linguistic diversity.”<br><br><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Access and success</b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">Prof Deresh Ramjugernath, Deputy Vice-Chancellor: Learning and Teaching, under whose portfolio the Language Policy falls, welcomed Council’s decision.<br></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><br> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">“Equitable access and student success are highly valued at SU, and language is key in this,” he said. “Our revised Language Policy will advance student success, as it creates a conducive teaching and learning environment – both in and outside the classroom, in student communities and in social spaces.”</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b> </b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Social cohesion on campus</b> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">Prof Ramjugernath added: “I am a strong believer that multilingualism can assist us greatly in building social cohesion on campus. Instead of dividing us, language can be used in a way that builds relationships and fosters mutual understanding. </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><br> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">“We respect language rights and believe that our students have more choices, more access and a better future as a result of the approach followed in our Language Policy.”</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Multilingualism</b> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">“When we refer to multilingualism, it relates to institutional and individual multilingualism, but also includes multilingualism as a means to promote inclusivity and an appreciation of the value of diversity,” Prof Ramjugernath continued. “Multilingualism goes beyond creating spaces and structures for the use of multiple languages in academic, administrative and social contexts, or individuals’ willingness to learn multiple languages. It is also about an attitude, a mindset, that we would like to foster at our institution.”</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">The 2021 SU Language Policy elaborates as follows on the benefits of this approach: “Multilingualism equips students to tap into a broader and more diverse knowledge base; to engage with society in a way that speaks to the heart, not just the mind; to be dynamic professionals, able to better demonstrate problem-solving, listening and interpersonal skills; and to be well-rounded individuals who can make informed decisions that take more than just their own thinking into consideration.”</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"><b>Thorough process</b></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">As the 2016 Language Policy passed constitutional muster in the 2019 judgment by the Constitutional Court, the Language Policy Revision Task Team used that policy as point of departure. The task team was made up of representatives of all ten SU’s faculties and its professional and administrative support services as well as student representatives, with technical experts co-opted as necessary.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Extensive consultation</b><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"> </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5">The task team compiled the first draft of the revised policy early this year and released the document for public participation in March/April 2021. The first draft, along with a response report of all inputs received, subsequently served before the Rectorate, faculty boards, Senate, the IF and Council for their feedback. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">Having considered all comments, the task team developed a second draft, which was again released for public participation in July/August. In September, the second draft and another response report of inputs received during the second round of participation were submitted to the Rectorate, faculty boards, Senate, IF and Council. </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"> </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5">The task team then completed the third and final draft of the 2021 Language Policy for submission to the IF and Senate in November, and to Council for final consideration and approval today. The final draft also served before the respective faculty boards in October and November.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">SU consulted widely on all drafts of the proposed Language Policy – the year-long revision process included a total of 24 meetings – and the task team considered all inputs. </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Policy provisions</b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">The policy provides for the use of Afrikaans, English and isiXhosa in learning and teaching at SU, as well as in communication (see highlights below). It also specifies the extent to which each language is to be used in various scenarios.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b><i>Learning and teaching</i></b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">Afrikaans and English are designated as SU’s primary languages of learning and teaching, but translanguaging in multiple languages is encouraged to support and enhance learning. IsiXhosa as an academic language will receive particular attention for the purpose of its incremental introduction into various disciplines, in accordance with student needs, where reasonably practicable.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b><i>Communication</i></b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">All official internal communication – i.e. communication from the Chancellor, Council, Senate, Rector or another member of top management to the entire University – will be conveyed in Afrikaans, English and isiXhosa. Afrikaans, English and, where reasonably practicable, isiXhosa are SU’s languages of external communication as well. And in student communities (residences and private student organisation wards), the use of language should ensure that everyone is included and can participate.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Implementation</b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5">The revised policy gives effect to the South African Constitution and the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions in relation to language use in the University’s academic, administrative, professional and social contexts. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"> </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5">The Language Policy provides for mechanisms to ensure academic oversight, effective management and good governance relating to language implementation. This occurs within a framework that enables faculties to develop language implementation plans as well as procedures for accountability and reporting to relevant structures.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"> </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5">The SU Language Centre will provide support, and the policy also outlines feedback, monitoring and conflict resolution mechanisms, including complaint procedures.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"> </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5">The Council-approved revised SU Language Policy will be implemented from January 2022.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="ms-rtefontface-5"><b> </b></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><b>Important documents</b></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;">Among others, the following key documents are available on SU’s dedicated language webpage at <span class="ms-rteForeColor-1" lang="EN-GB"><a href="/language"><span class="ms-rteForeColor-1" lang="EN-ZA"><strong>www.sun.ac.za/language</strong></span></a></span>:</p><ul><li>Language Policy (2021) (in Afrikaans, English and isiXhosa)</li><li>Context document for revision of Language Policy (2021)</li><li>Main opinion about the legality of proposed 2021 Language Policy</li><li>Supplementary opinion about the legality of final draft of the proposed 2021 Language Policy</li></ul><br><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="eop">Answers to frequently asked questions about language at SU, as well as statistics, are available at </span><span class="ms-rteForeColor-1" lang="EN-GB"><a href="/english/about-us/multilingualism"><span class="ms-rteForeColor-1" lang="EN-ZA"><strong>www.sun.ac.za/english/about-us/multilingualism</strong></span></a></span><span class="MsoHyperlink ms-rteForeColor-1">.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;margin-bottom:0cm;"><span class="MsoHyperlink"><span style="color:windowtext;"><br></span></span> </p><a href="/english/Documents/Language/Final_Language%20policy%20infographic%20English.pdf"><strong>Infographic</strong></a><strong> about the 2021 Language Policy </strong><br><p><em>Please note:</em> The <a href="/english/Documents/Language/Final_Language%20policy%20infographic%20English.pdf"><strong class="ms-rteForeColor-1">infographic</strong></a> explains policy highlights in simple terms, but the policy itself remains the only formal source to be consulted for official detail about its principles and provisions.<br><br></p></div>
SU hosts language colloquium for higher education institutionshttp://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8596SU hosts language colloquium for higher education institutionsCorporate Communication and Marketing / Korporatiewe Kommunikasie en Bemarking<p>​Stellenbosch University (SU) will host an online language colloquium for public universities this week. The Colloquium on the New Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions takes place from 28-29 September 2021 under the auspices of Universities South Africa (USAf) and is a joint project with USAf's Community of Practice for the Teaching and Learning of African Languages (CoPAL) and SU.<br></p><p>Speakers include Justice Albie Sachs, retired Judge of the South African Constitutional Court, and vice-chancellors of, amongst others, the Universities of Stellenbosch, Cape Town and the Free State as well as Rhodes University.</p><p>It is the first in a series of events to be hosted by universities on the New Language Policy for Higher Education, which was gazetted in October 2020. Vice-chancellors and deputy vice-chancellors will gather with experts and other stakeholders to contemplate ways to implement the policy.</p><p>According to USAf, the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions “has brought the language question sharply to the fore. Higher education institutions have developed university language policies, but there is a significant need for key stakeholders in the sector to deepen their understanding of the Language Policy Framework and the implementation thereof".</p><p>Dr Sizwe Mabizela, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of Rhodes University and the Chairperson of USAf's Teaching and Learning Strategy Group, said: “We must take the language policy from the periphery that it occupies within our institutions and place it at the centre of vice-chancellors' strategic outlook. This is central to acknowledging the diversity of our students on our institutions. We also need to instil a sense of pride in our own languages and convey a message to our children, of the importance of English, but lift all other languages to the same level as important media of communication for our thoughts and ideas. Our people must enjoy seeing their languages being respected. Language also builds a nation."</p><p>Prof Wim de Villiers, Rector of SU, welcomed the opportunity to collaborate with other universities. “We are looking forward to participating in this important conversation, and to gaining insights from colleagues and experts from other institutions. At SU we are aware of the challenges and opportunities surrounding the implementation of a language policy, how it aligns itself with the Language Policy for Higher Education, and the fierce debate it creates. And we welcome this debate. Collaboration is key. Our honest conversations can lead to solutions. Through actions like these we can come to a deeper understanding of the value of multilingualism," he said.</p><p>SU's Language Policy advances multilingualism, considering “the diversity of our society and the intellectual wealth inherent in that diversity".</p><p>Topics at the colloquium include <em>Framing the New Language Policy for Higher Education within the South African Constitution</em>; <em>The role of language in transforming the higher education institutions; The New Language Policy Framework as responsive to the imperatives of student access and student success; The challenges in the implementation of the New Language Policy for Higher Education; The opportunities presented by the New Language Policy Framework in reimaging the idea of a university in Africa; and Transforming the academy using African languages as enablers</em>.</p><p><strong>Language Day </strong></p><p>In celebration of the opportunities and possibilities that multilingualism hold, the Division for Learning and Teaching Enhancement at SU is once again hosting its Language Day, on 30 September, for staff and students.</p><p>The theme this year is <strong>'</strong><em>Language, learning, life! Implementing multilingualism @SU in academic and social spaces. </em>Language Day is not about the Language Policy itself, but focuses on how language is approached at SU.</p><p>The two sub-themes highlighted this year are <em>Multilingualism in (augmented remote) learning, teaching and assessment</em>; and, <em>Multilingualism in administrative, social and living spaces</em>.</p><p>“We will discuss ways to integrate a multilingual mindset in teaching, learning and assessment as well as in social life outside the classroom. The two panel discussions with subsequent breakaway group discussions will give SU staff and students the opportunity to make their voices heard, share best practice and try to find solutions to challenges together," explains Dr Antoinette van der Merwe, Senior Director: Learning and Teaching Enhancement.  </p><p>“We believe that multilingualism is about more than just being able to use multiple languages. It is about giving people a voice, regardless of the language(s) they use.</p><ul><li>Click <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=as7RgJfeSZg&feature=emb_logo">here</a> for a video about Lan​guage Day</li></ul><br> <br><p><br></p>