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Inclusive deliberation required to drive collective climate actions – Dr Dominic Okolikohttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8846Inclusive deliberation required to drive collective climate actions – Dr Dominic OkolikoCorporate Communication & Marketing / Korporatiewe Kommunikasie & Bemarking [Alec Basson]<p>​​The manner in which the media reports on climate change influences people's perceptions, attitudes and support for climate policy. Media(ted) climate change communication, i.e. the presentation of climate change as a policy and people's view of climate change in the media, has been recognised as an important space where the public make sense of climate issues. Unfortunately, little attention has been given to the nature of social diversity, or different categories of social actors, in media representations and the extent to which it affects public sense-making around climate change governance.<br></p><p>This is according to Dr Dominic Okoliko from the School of Public Leadership at Stellenbosch University (SU). He obtained his doctorate in Public and Development Management on Tuesday 14 December 2021 at SU's December graduation.<br></p><p>For his PhD study, Okoliko, who hails from Nigeria, explored media(ted) climate change communication in South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya by analysing articles on climate change in some of these countries' major newspapers and also interviewing journalists covering the issue. His analysis focused on the extent to which social diversity and a plurality of views are reflected in the media's coverage of climate change.</p><p>Okoliko says sustainability transitions require an engaged public who are negotiating, endorsing, and legitimising policy options. Therefore, his study redirects attention to how the processes of sense-making in the media on climate change issues reveal positionalities and material realities that shape the climate change discourse. According to Okoliko, positionalities refer to how differences in social position and power shape the claims-maker's role.<br></p><p>He adds that we have a limited understanding of how lower-income societies, especially those in Africa, engage in sense-making around climate change through the media. He says these societies are often the most vulnerable to the damaging effects of climate change.<br></p><p>Okoliko says the results of his study showed that a range of actors, including politicians, experts, transnational development agencies, business people, civil society groups and ordinary members of the public, are given a voice in the media. <br></p><p>“However, my study found that the views of politicians and experts received unparalleled and privileged coverage. Ordinary members of the public were remarkably under-represented which indicates a skewed climate change representation towards the elites. This was true for the newspapers analysed across the three countries. <br></p><p>“The results indicate that it matters to pay attention to who gets heard when climate change is discussed. Different actors emphasise the interpretations which align with their values and interests. <br></p><p>“For example, the industry actors were closely matched to economic frames on climate change while the public were more likely to speak on impacts and agricultural frames. What this tells us is that under-representation of a particular group could limit their contribution to public deliberation on climate change."<br></p><p>Okoliko adds that all the journalists he interviewed agreed it is important to expand the deliberative space offered by the media to the public on climate change. <br></p><p>“They mentioned, however, that in reality a plurality of views is not always accommodated. This has to do with how the journalists perceive their role in relation to covering climate change, the kind of norms that guide their practice, and the material conditions under which they work."<br></p><p>Okoliko says the journalists also mentioned the impact dwindling media revenue has had on climate change reporting. <br></p><p>“They indicated that news about the environment and climate change often takes a backseat because of limited resources. Additionally, as editors try to meet the expectations of readers to guarantee more 'clicks' and 'comments', news about climate change does not feature so prominently unless of course, it's about a specific natural disaster." <br></p><p>Okoliko says because climate change is not a problem of a particular group or location, exposing people to the differences in experience of and perspectives on climate change can help to raise awareness and transform attitudes towards climate solutions. <br></p><p>“My study emphasises the importance of co-creative sense-making regarding climate change and as well as the danger of elite-driven media(ted) deliberation that limits bottom-up participation.<br></p><p>“Public sense-making regarding climate change should be a process of inclusive deliberation because the issue is complex, multi-layered and cross-sectoral with many different actors involved. Inclusive deliberation is required to drive collective climate actions."<br></p><p><strong>Photo</strong>: Dr Dominic Okoliko at the graduation ceremony. <strong>Photographer</strong>: Stefan Els</p><p> <br></p><p>​<br></p>
An Exploratory type of research to evaluate the impact of a selected ECD centres on immediate familieshttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8809An Exploratory type of research to evaluate the impact of a selected ECD centres on immediate familiesSPL Media Reporter <p>​​<br><br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">A global literature search on early childhood development reveals that numerous studies and academic papers have focused on the macro, meso and micro factors deemed necessary for an effective Early Childhood Development (ECD) programme. The literature has also confirmed and presented evidence which supports the benefits and outcomes of ECD programmes. Furthermore, the limitations, challenges and prevailing weak social and economic dimensions have also been identified and explained which negate the effectiveness of these ECD programmes. No literature could be traced on the positive and negative impact or influence of preschool learners who attend an ECD programme on the immediate family and/or household.​<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">The research study attempted to conduct an exploratory type of research to evaluate the impact of a selected ECD centre, commonly referred to as a crèche or nursery school, on the immediate families and households of the preschool learners who attended and completed the ECD programme offered at this ECD centre.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The ECD centre is located in the village of Prince Alfred Hamlet within the municipal jurisdiction of Witzenberg Municipality, Western Cape Province, South Africa. The village is a sub-economic rural town with the majority of the population employed as seasonal farm workers within the indigent economic category. The ECD centre was established 10 years ago with an annual enrolment target ranging between 75–150 learners. The age of the learners who enter the pre-reception level varies between eighteen months to five years.</p><p>The ECD programme offered by the selected ECD centre served as the single case for this research study. The study falls within an interpretivist paradigm with an exploratory research design through the adoption of qualitative research methods.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The target population included the Grade 7 learners who were registered at the primary school – also referred to as the receiving school – and who attended the selected ECD centre. The learners, purposively selected, attained Grade 6 in the required minimum academic period. The parents or guardians of the target population were also identified as a second participant grouping. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">Arising from the analysis of the literature analysis, four primary constructs were identified and defined for the two focus group sessions which provided the premise for the design and development of the research data collection guidelines. The four primary constructs were:​<br></p><ul><li>Social Development;</li><li>Cognitive Development;</li><li>Social Family Structure/Function; and</li><li>Social Interpersonal Relationships.</li></ul><p style="text-align:justify;">A qualitative thematic framework was developed to structure the narrative analysis so that the personal experiences of the learners and parents/guardians could be interpreted according to the functional analysis procedure that observed their actual story. To ensure thematic analysis of the learner and parent/guardian narratives was conducted systematically and consistently, one researcher who was not part of the data collection procedure, analysed the narratives resulting in intra-coder reliability and stability from which valid inferences could be made.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The learners' bias was on the family structure/function and interpersonal themes and associated sub-themes when asked to prioritise and rank, rather than on the family domestic challenges such as causes of conflict and anti-social behaviour which were beyond their control. In their individual development ranking, a strong indication was detected that they were not comfortable with these occurrences. The parents/guardians who participated were all female and aligned towards cognitive development and its accumulated benefits with social development also scoring very high which included family socialisation and communication manifested in discipline and adaptive behaviour at home.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">As an exploratory type of research, it may be concluded that the research study achieved its aim, however, the actual impact, positive or negative on each sub-theme was not determined due to the complexity and nature of the research. The thematic framework provided a good premise to measure, qualitatively, the perception and degree of importance within the family context but could not identify the manifestations or recorded events which could be linked or ascribed to the influence of the selected ECD centre.<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><br></p><p style="text-align:center;"> <img src="/english/faculty/economy/spl/SPL%20Library/ECD%20Colage%20.jpg" alt="" style="margin:0px;width:550px;height:445px;" /><br></p><p><br></p><p>​<br></p>
SU alumna Dr Patience Mbava appointed as Chairperson of Financial and Fiscal Commission https://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8493SU alumna Dr Patience Mbava appointed as Chairperson of Financial and Fiscal Commission SPL Media Reporter <p>​<br><span style="text-align:justify;">The Financial and Fiscal Commission (Commission) is pleased to announce the appointment of its full-time Chairperson Dr Patience Nombeko Mbava, by the President of the Republic of South Africa Mr Cyril Ramaphosa. Dr Mbava is appointed for a term of five years with effect from 17 August 2021.</span><br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">Dr Nombeko Mbava holds a PHD: Public and Development Management; and MBA (Stellenbosch University) as well as a Bachelor of Arts in Economics (Smith College, Massachusetts, USA). She brings a wealth of expertise as a member of various boards. Dr Mbava has headed monitoring and evaluation units in public entities where she provided strategic leadership for activities related to organisational strategy development and governance. She served as a board member at the South African Monitoring and Evaluation Association. She is a Research Fellow - Public Sector Monitoring and Evaluation at the Stellenbosch University School of Public Leadership. Dr Mbava has exemplary academic awards and achievements</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The Commission would also like to extend its gratitude to the Deputy Chairperson for his stewardship during his tenure as the Acting Chairperson after the untimely passing away of the erstwhile Chairperson the late Prof Daniel Plaatjies.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The Commission looks forward to the leadership of Dr Mbava and wishes her well in her responsibilities.</p><p style="text-align:justify;"> <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><br></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><br></p><p>​<br></p>
Ethical, accountable leadership needed to fix dysfunctional municipalitieshttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8422Ethical, accountable leadership needed to fix dysfunctional municipalitiesHarlan Cloete <p>​Will our government's District Development Model be enough to fix dysfunctional municipalities? This is the question Dr Harlan Cloete from the School of Public Leadership tried to answer in an opinion piece for <em>Cape Tim</em>es (21 July 2021).<br></p><ul><li>Read the article below or click <a href="https://pclientclips.s3.af-south-1.amazonaws.com/20210721/NSU-1626842609559_13465B3.pdf#page=1"><strong class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0">here</strong></a><strong class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0"> </strong>for the piece as published.</li></ul><p><strong>​Harlan Cloete*</strong> <br></p><p>In South Africa, barely a day goes by without reported treasonous revelations of fraud and corruption, wastage, infrastructure deterioration and municipalities that have lost the confidence of the very communities they are called to serve, expressed through sometimes violent “service delivery" unrest spearheaded by the poor. The latest report by the Auditor-General (AG) confirms that some municipalities have quite frankly become dysfunctional as unbridled looting and incompetence abound.   </p><p style="text-align:justify;">Not surprisingly, the reporting by municipalities on their performance was even worse than their financial reporting. Less than a quarter of our municipalities could provide quality performance reports to audit, while just under half of them continue to publish performance information that was unreliable or had little relevance to what they had promised to do in their strategic planning documents (i.e. the Integrated Development Plan and the Work Skills and Equity Plans). <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">The District Development Model (DDM) is government's latest response to arrest the bedevilling governance collapse of municipalities. The DDM is built on a set of guiding principles. And principles don't change. As the saying goes, “What goes up, must come down". The guiding principles (read behaviours)  of the DDM advocate a joint “One Plan" effected through a series of collaborative and deep integrated planning sessions reflecting on research, evidence, solution and innovation-oriented dialogues based on each district/metro's own dynamics, challenges and opportunities. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">It's not about ticking boxes and being driven by compliance, but rather re-imagining a preferred future and identifying the strategies and interventions that will enable change and impact. One of the challenges the DDM seeks to overcome is the absence of an automated system to manage DDM operations, reporting, monitoring and governance as there is no centralised repository of data to enable government to realise the vision of coordinated planning & budgeting. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">The institutional vehicle for the DDM is the district hub. The hub, in turn, is governed through three workstreams: the Integrated Planning & Implementation stream tasked to undertake and/or coordinate research related to service delivery and development; the Capacity Building stream oversees the implementation of capacity building; and the Monitoring stream will develop baseline monitoring information and data to ensure that service delivery takes place. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">But hang on, have we not seen this before?  It's a big ask to trust those responsible for the failure of local government to rebuild it. Those, who through tick-box compliance, governed us into this mess.<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">Over the course of the last two decades, there have been so many initiatives, plans and strategies and even direct interventions by the national and provincial government, with very little impact, as confirmed by the office of the AG. So what hope is there that the DDM will be the panacea for local governance ills?</p><p style="text-align:justify;">I believe and concur with the AG that the only way to turn this around and ensure good governance, is if ethical and accountable local government leadership drives the desired behavioural change. What this requires is a leadership that understands the why (purpose), the how (competencies) and the what (innovative service delivery in an ever-changing context) of public office. And this is a non-partisan endeavour. When elected leaders put their purpose together and focus only on impact and results, the community ultimately benefit. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">And this is achieved through disciplined and committed constitutionalists such as Kennith Fourie and Nomvuyo Mposelwa, chief financial officer (CFO) and mayor of the rural Senqu municipality in the Eastern Cape respectively. The pair led the municipality to another clean audit by getting the basics right. Fourie rose from an intern to CFO and ascribes the success to adherence to daily disciplines (implementing procedures, systems, planning, etc.). Mayor Mposelwa, on the other hand, is firmly focused on making sure the job gets done by not interfering with tenders or finances. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">In addition to ethical leaders like Mposelwa, we will need human resource development (HRD) practitioners to be skilled in advising and helping municipal leaders navigate the complex organisational change management programmes such as the DDM, given that 70% of change management initiatives fail or partially succeed. These practitioners must assume new roles as credible change strategic partners of managers who are tasked with aligning people, strategy, and performance as pointed out by acclaimed British scholar Robert Hamlin in the book <em>Evidence-based organizational change and development </em>(2019).</p><p style="text-align:justify;">Although I choose to remain optimistic, I am afraid that the DDM may very well be our last chance to get our local government house in order. Communities are quite frankly fed-up with municipal mediocrity. And there must be consequences for poor performance. I know it's a big ask, but communities must claim back their agency and vote in their numbers in the next local government elections. They should also actively participate between elections to articulate the deferred dream of 1994. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">Getting things back on track will require a whole-of-society approach that includes, among others, tertiary institutions that must partner with municipalities to strengthen local government through the application of evidence-based policymaking and the science of implementation (delivery).<br></p><ul><li>Photo courtesy of <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Apartheid_Soweto_Joburg_South_Africa_Slum_Bidonville_July_2005.jpg"><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0"><strong>Wikimedia Commo</strong><strong><span>n</span><span>s</span></strong></span></a>.<br></li></ul><p style="text-align:justify;"><strong><em>*</em></strong><strong><em>Dr Harlan Cloete is an extraordinary lecturer at the School of Public Leadership at Stellenbosch University. His main research interest is exploring evidence-based HRD governance systems in the public sector with a keen interest in local government.</em></strong></p><p>​<br></p>
Student entrepreneur's winning app to assist disadvantaged learnershttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8419Student entrepreneur's winning app to assist disadvantaged learnersDaniel Bugan<p>​​​</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Lindelwa Mahlalela, a final-year student in the Sustainable Development Diploma programme in the<strong> </strong>School of Public Leadership, has been selected as the overall winner in the Stellenbosch University (SU) round of the Entrepreneurship Development in Higher Education (EDHE) Intervarsity Competition for 2021.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">SU's internal round of the EDHE Competition, presented by the LaunchLab and the SU Office of the Vice-Rector for Research from 17 May to 19 June, required studentpreneurs to pitch their businesses or ideas.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Mahlalela entered her business, LeeConnect, under the Existing Business – Social Impact category. LeeConnect aims to give disadvantaged learners the opportunity to further their studies, and the necessary support structure when they get to tertiary institutions. It offers services that assist young people with university, college and bursary applications, as well as career guidance and mentorship. The company also offers extra classes where they assist learners to improve their marks.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Mahlalela says she entered the EDHE competition because it was a great opportunity for her to showcase her passion.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“I am passionate about education. It is my goal to educate people worldwide to believe in themselves, follow their dreams and further their studies. LeeConnect was established in 2018 after I met a young girl who passed her matric with outstanding results but had no idea what an email address was. I saw the need to educate and assist young people in rural areas to apply for tertiary institutions because they are not exposed to information and technological advancements.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“Starting LeeConnect has made me realise that I want to be the change that I want to see in my community. The experience has helped me polish my leadership and communication skills. I am good at working with people, to empower and inspire them. I take a great deal of pride and joy in guiding others to work together to improve themselves and their communities. I believe that knowledge is useless when we keep it to ourselves, but knowledge becomes powerful when we share it with others."<br></p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">LeeConnect recently partnered with 24-year-old information technology software development final-year student at Tshwane University of Technology, Dingaan Letjane, the founder and creator of an app called UniAPS.<br></p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“The app allows learners to check which courses they qualify for and in which universities, and they receive more information about our services to assist them with the application processes," explains Mahlalela.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">She says studying the Sustainable Development programme has sharpened her entrepreneurial abilities and given her the confidence to start LeeConnect.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“In my first year, I learnt a lot about the importance of self-reflection. I had an amazing experience when we were given a task to brainstorm business ideas that were related to one or more of the sustainable development goals. Teamwork was mandatory and I believe that forced me out of my comfort zone and helped me to adjust and adapt to different situations. All the practical learning has given me the necessary qualities of being an entrepreneur.<br></p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“The Diploma in Sustainable Development is an exceptional opportunity for aspiring social entrepreneurs because it challenges you to unlearn and relearn and be committed to life-long learning."<br></p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Mahlalela credits her mother, Thobile Hlatshwayo, for being her strength and the inspiration for LeeConnect.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“My mother has always supported every dream I have. Venture capitalist and serial entrepreneur Vusi Thembekwayo once said, 'Find someone who speaks greatness into you when you can't speak greatness into yourself'. That someone in my life is my mom."<br></p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Prof Ingrid Woolard, Dean of the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, congratulated Mahlalela on her achievement.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">“This is a very exciting project. It is incredibly difficult for learners to navigate the higher education sector and to find the information they need. Lindelwa's app will go a long way in helping to bridge that information gap. We wish her every success in the next round."<br></p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Mahlalela will now represent SU in the regional round of the competition in August where she will be competing with winners from other universities.</p><p style="font-size:14px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";background-color:#ffffff;">Should she emerge as a regional winner, she will then pitch her business in the national finals in November where she stands a chance to walk away with prize money to the value of R100 000 as the overall winner.<br></p><ul style="padding:0px;margin:0px 0px 10px 25px;color:#333333;font-family:calibri, verdana, trebuchet, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, "helvetica neue";font-size:14px;background-color:#ffffff;"><li style="line-height:20px;">Photo supplied<br></li></ul><p>​<br></p>
Africa crippled by corruptionhttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8402Africa crippled by corruptionPregala Pillay, Evan Mantzaris & Chris Jones <p>​Sunday (11 July) was African Anti-Corruption Day. In opinion pieces for the media, Profs Pregala Pillay (School of Public Leadership) & Evan Mantzaris (School of Public Leadership & Mangosuthu University of Technology), and Dr Chris Jones (Unit for Moral Leadership) reflect on what it will take to root out corruption in South Africa and the rest of the continent. Click on the links below to read the articles.<br></p><ul><li>Profs Pregala Pillay & Evan Mantzaris (<a href="https://www.news24.com/news24/columnists/guestcolumn/opinion-pregala-pillay-evan-mantzaris-covid-19-was-another-opportunity-for-the-corrupt-to-loot-20210709"><strong class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0">News24</strong></a>)</li><li>​Dr Chris Jones (<a href="https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2021-07-06-corruption-is-crippling-africa-more-like-sand-than-oil-in-the-economic-engine/"><strong class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0">Daily Maveric</strong>k</a>)</li></ul><p>Image courtesy of <a href="https://www.piqsels.com/en/public-domain-photo-zogjr"><strong class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0">piqsels.com</strong></a>.<br></p><p>​<br></p>
The School of Public Leadership pays tribute to one of its doctoral candidates, the late Mr John Kavumahttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8354The School of Public Leadership pays tribute to one of its doctoral candidates, the late Mr John KavumaSPL Media Reporter <p>​​​​​<br></p><table cellspacing="0" class="ms-rteTable-0" style="height:707px;width:100%;"><tbody><tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-0"><td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-0" style="width:50%;">​<img src="/english/faculty/economy/spl/SPL%20Library/JK%20Tribute%20.png" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:478px;" /><br><br></td><td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-0" style="width:50%;"><div style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2"><br></span></div><div style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">It is with great sorrow that the Director of the School of Public Leadership, Prof Zweli Ndevu, his PhD Supervisor, Prof Tania Ajam and our staff and students have learnt of the untimely passing of ​our former doctoral candidate, Mr John Bosco Kintu Kavuma, on 6 June 2021.<br><br></span></div><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">Before enrolling at SPL, John had been awarded a B.Sc (Economics) degree, an MA (Economic Policy Management), and a Postgraduate Diploma in ICT Policy and Regulations from Makerere University, Kampala. He also obtained an MBA (International Business) from Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh.</span></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">He had worked in the fields of planning, research and strategic and institutional development at the National IT Authority (NITA) and the National Planning Authority (NPA) of Uganda, with extensive experience in project management and monitoring and evaluation.</span></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2"></span><span style="font-size:11pt;">He will be remembered for his fine mind and love of learning, devotion to family and friends, his professionalism and work ethic. A highly motivated individual, he pursued his dreams with a single minded passion. His doctoral research aimed at enhancing the policy and regulatory responses of developing countries to circular economy challenges through digital transformation through a case study of e-waste management. </span></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">This cruel pandemic has deprived SPL, Uganda and indeed Africa of the type of innovative young intellectual needed to enable us to rise to the twin challenges of environmental and digital transformation which are confronting our continent,  and indeed the world.</span></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">We at SPL extend our sincerest condolences to his wife, Ms Esther Kavuma, and his family and friends, and pray that she will have a rapid and complete recovery. </span></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">Die Skool vir Openbare Leierskap betaal hulle aan een van sy doktorale kandidate, die wye Mnr. John Kavuma</span><br></p><br></td></tr></tbody></table><p>​​<br></p>
The School of Public Leadership pays tribute to one of its postgraduate students, the late Mr Jabulani Mathehttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8323The School of Public Leadership pays tribute to one of its postgraduate students, the late Mr Jabulani MatheSPL Media Reporter <table cellspacing="0" width="100%" class="ms-rteTable-0"><tbody><tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-0"><td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-0" style="width:50%;"><div style="text-align:center;">​​​​​​​​<img src="/english/faculty/economy/spl/SPL%20Library/J%20Mathe%202.png" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:386px;height:544px;" /></div><br></td><td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-0" style="width:50%;"><div style="text-align:justify;">​​<span class="ms-rteFontSize-2">Prof Zweli Ndevu, Director of the School of Public Leadership, together with our staff and students are deeply saddened to learn of the untimely and tragic passing of our former postgraduate student, Mr Jabulani Mathe. Mr Mathe made a valuable contribution to the Monitoring and Evaluation Discourse and was a recipient of an award by the South African Monitoring and Evaluation Association, where he served as an eminent Board Member.  </span><span class="ms-rteFontSize-2">He was respected as a skilful practitioner ​​and influential specialist in his field with an extraordinary work ethic.<br><br></span></div><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteFontSize-2">Mr Mathe was an exceptional thinker with a bright and prosperous future.  It was an honour to say that he was proudly associated with our School and University. He published several articles and book chapters in addition to presenting papers at national and international conferences.  He served in a leadership capacity in the Office of the Presidency in South Africa and Namibia.  </span></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><br class="ms-rteFontSize-2"></p><p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteFontSize-2">We will miss a loveable, kind-hearted, humble and industrious individual with an immense sense of integrity and compassion. He lived a life of selflessness, generosity and inspiration. Our tears are flowing for a special student, a great man and a gentle soul. He left an indelible mark in broader society and touched many lives.  He will be dearly missed but his legacy will live on.  We extend our prayers and heartfelt condolences to the bereaved family. God rest his soul in peace!​<br></span></p><br></td></tr></tbody></table><p><br><br></p><p><br></p>
Towards the regeneration of the university and public policy in Africa (Part One & Two)https://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8268Towards the regeneration of the university and public policy in Africa (Part One & Two)SPL Media Reporter <p><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" style="font-size:11pt;"></span><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="ms-rteFontSize-2 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1" style="font-size:11pt;">In this two-part Op-Ed, published in Daily Maverick (17 & 18 May 2021), Prof Firoz Khan, specializing in development studies at the School of Public Leadership (SPL), explores the origins and evolution of the university in Africa; and the relevance of the content and curriculum of mainstream public policy to the dreams, aspirations and needs of the continent's poor. The articles argue for a radical rethink of the purpose, role and mission of the university in Africa together with a long overdue regeneration of a public policy that is fit for purpose.​</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":150,"335559740":240}" class="ms-rteFontSize-2 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1"> </span><br></p><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW244636957" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;text-align:left;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;">Links to articles: </span><span class="EOP SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":150,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"> </span></span></p><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2"><span class="EOP SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":150,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"><br></span></span></p></div><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW244636957" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;text-align:left;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun EmptyTextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"></span><a class="Hyperlink SCXW244636957 BCX0" href="https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-17-towards-the-regeneration-of-the-university-and-public-policy-in-africa-part-one/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:inherit;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"></span></a></p><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW171051932" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;font-family:"segoe ui", "segoe ui web", arial, verdana, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW171051932 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><a class="Hyperlink SCXW171051932 BCX0" href="https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-17-towards-the-regeneration-of-the-university-and-public-policy-in-africa-part-one/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:inherit;"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun Underlined SCXW171051932 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:#0563c1;font-size:12pt;line-height:19px;font-family:calibri, calibri_embeddedfont, calibri_msfontservice, sans-serif;"><span class="NormalTextRun SCXW171051932 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;"><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-2-5">Towards the regeneration of the university and public policy in Africa (Part One) – Prof Firoz Khan, 17 May 2021</span>​ ​</span></span></a><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun EmptyTextRun SCXW171051932 BCX0" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:12pt;line-height:18px;font-family:"times new roman", "times new roman_embeddedfont", "times new roman_msfontservice", serif;"></span><span class="EOP SCXW171051932 BCX0" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:12pt;line-height:18px;font-family:"times new roman", "times new roman_embeddedfont", "times new roman_msfontservice", serif;"> </span></p></div><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW171051932" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;font-family:"segoe ui", "segoe ui web", arial, verdana, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW171051932 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW171051932 BCX0" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:12pt;line-height:18px;font-family:"times new roman", "times new roman_embeddedfont", "times new roman_msfontservice", serif;"><span class="NormalTextRun SCXW171051932 BCX0" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;"></span></span><span class="EOP SCXW171051932 BCX0" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:12pt;line-height:18px;font-family:"times new roman", "times new roman_embeddedfont", "times new roman_msfontservice", serif;"> ​</span></p></div></div><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW244636957" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;text-align:left;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><br></p></div><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW244636957" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;text-align:left;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun EmptyTextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"></span><a class="Hyperlink SCXW244636957 BCX0" href="https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-18-towards-the-regeneration-of-the-university-and-public-policy-in-africa-part-two/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:inherit;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;">​Towards the regeneration of the university and public policy in Africa (Part Two) - Prof Firoz Khan, 18 May 2021</span></a></p><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><br></p><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><a class="Hyperlink SCXW244636957 BCX0" href="https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-18-towards-the-regeneration-of-the-university-and-public-policy-in-africa-part-two/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:inherit;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"><em> ​</em></span></a></p><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><a class="Hyperlink SCXW244636957 BCX0" href="https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-18-towards-the-regeneration-of-the-university-and-public-policy-in-africa-part-two/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:inherit;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:19px;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW41444892 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;line-height:19px;"><span class="NormalTextRun SCXW41444892 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;"><em>Image: Illustrative image | Sources: Gallo Images / Ziyaad Douglas | EPA-EFE / Nic </em></span><span class="NormalTextRun SpellingErrorV2 SCXW41444892 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;background-repeat:repeat-x;background-position:left bottom;"><em>Bothma</em></span><span class="NormalTextRun SCXW41444892 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;"><em> | EPA-EFE / Andy Rain | Flickr​</em></span></span><span class="EOP SCXW41444892 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;line-height:19px;"> </span><em>​</em></span></a><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun EmptyTextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:18px;"></span><span class="EOP SCXW244636957 BCX0 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;line-height:18px;"> </span></p></div><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX0 SCXW244636957" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;font-family:"segoe ui", "segoe ui web", arial, verdana, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:windowtext;"><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-ZA" class="TextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:12pt;line-height:18px;font-family:"times new roman", "times new roman_embeddedfont", "times new roman_msfontservice", serif;"><span class="NormalTextRun SCXW244636957 BCX0" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;"></span></span><span class="EOP SCXW244636957 BCX0" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":240}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:12pt;line-height:18px;font-family:"times new roman", "times new roman_embeddedfont", "times new roman_msfontservice", serif;"> ​</span></p></div><p>​<br></p>
Municipalities should respond better to needs of communitieshttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=8232Municipalities should respond better to needs of communitiesHarlan Cloete<p>Municipal elections will be held later this year. In an opinion piece for <em>News24 </em>(11 May), Dr Harlan Cloete from the School of Public Leadership points out why local government officials need to pay more attention to the problems of their communities.<br></p><ul><li><p>Read the article below or click <a href="https://www.news24.com/news24/analysis/analysis-why-local-government-needs-to-be-more-responsive-to-its-communities-20210511"><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0"><strong>here</strong></span></a><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0"> </span>for the piece as published.<br></p></li></ul><p><strong>​Harlan Cloete*</strong> </p><p>We recently celebrated 27 years of democracy. In many ways so much has changed and in so many ways nothing has changed in South Africa. We continue to be haunted by the demons of poverty, unemployment, inequality, and corruption. And can you believe it, there is still no consensus on who is African and who not.</p><p>Freedom Day (27 April) was also an opportunity to further examine just how far we have travelled on our bumpy fragile democracy. Ours is a constitutional democracy, with the constitution being the supreme law of the land, regulating the relationship between those in government and those being governed (governance). The constitution calls for regular free and fair elections. On 27 October this year, we again have an opportunity to elect new local government leadership.<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">The constitution defines a municipality as three actors sharing the stage i.e. elected (politicians), the appointed (administrators) and the community (civil society). These actors are enjoined in a complex relationship that have not been without problems around control and power. It's a governance mess, with the actors often at loggerheads, pointing accusing fingers or simply fast asleep on the job. More than often leadership equates to a license to loot, the case in many a municipality.<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">Democratic governance is expressed in two ways. Firstly, representative democracy has political parties nominate candidates that are voted into office for a five-year term. Once in office, whoever party wins, have the right to govern, not rule. Kings and Queens rule.  Political parties govern. We need to remember this. The flipside of representative democracy is participatory democracy, creating the space for active citizen participation in between elections. Genuine participation by communities in the affairs of local government, not like an IDP manager when I probed him as to what exactly happens with all the inputs from the communities, he smirked, “ons neem kennis" (we take note).<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">This grassroots governance model calls into being elected ward committees, the constitutional structure, considered the arms and legs of participatory democracy.  They are a non-partisan structure allowing different interest groups and individuals within a geographic ward an opportunity to dream and dare. But previous research has shown their failures. In many instances they are but sweetheart committees functioning at the behest of the ward councilor who acts as both referee and player. Ineffective. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">Less than a year ago the Oudtshoorn Gemeenskap Inisiatief (Oudtshoorn Community Initiative), constituted by a group of local leaders, announced their dissatisfaction with the status quo and registered a political party ready to contest local government elections. They find themselves in the company of yet another new kid on the block in the Drakenstein Municipality, namely the Concerned Drakenstein Residents (CDR) who also started off as a community organisation fighting for the rights of local communities. But what is interesting is that CDR has gone a step further, establishing their own ward committees to tackle service delivery challenges, irrespecptive of not being recognized by the formal system. Political parties enter elections to win and what is interesting is that both community groups have expressed their intent to govern their respective municipalities. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">It is anyone's guess whether these smaller community-based parties will be able to take votes away from political behemoths the DA and the ANC, who face their own internal leadership challenges from failed national experiments to constitutional defiance. Both parties will have to work hard to restore their national image. However, the dynamics at local government elections is completely different. Here it is about how responsive local government is to the needs of local communities. <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">It's fair to say that both the DA and ANC must be nervous at the prospects of governing with the very vocal community-based political parties who may very well end up being kingmakers in their respective councils. Could these two aforementioned initiatives be the sign of an electorate becoming  tired of being governed from Wale Street and Luthuli House? Or should we brace ourselves for more coalition governments who some argue deliver far better service for communities as was evident in the early days of the Joburg coalition led by Herman Mashaba?<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">And this is local democracy in action. Let's face it, democracy is not always clean; its messy, highly contested, the terrain of gladiators with vested competing interests. Like the late Cecyl Esau remarked, “I did not join the struggle for people to vote for one political party, I joined the struggle for the right of people to decide whoever best they think should represent them".  <br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">And this is where local community media such as community radio stations can and should play the role of sense-maker. By facilitating debates and informing and educating listeners about how government works and to hold local leaders to account. For the municipality to expain the link between consecutive clean audits and deteriorating dirty streets.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">They must use their hyper-local influence to put forward proposals to resource civic education programmes and to mobilise the youth to be democracy players and not mere spectators. And to encourage the electorate to ask questions. Ours is not a tick-box democracy, rather it's a call on local government together with the citizens to reimagine a preferred future through the identification of appropriate strategies and interventions that will enable change and impact as envisaged in the District Development Model. This calls on evidenced-based research, solutions and innovative dialogues that focus on the unique local challenges and opportunities.  </p><p style="text-align:justify;">So brace yourself for the democracy games. Local government elections 2021 may very well see the rise of more community-based political parties outside the metros. As Aristotle so succinctly puts it, <em>politics is the art of the possible.</em> </p><p style="text-align:justify;"><strong><em>*</em></strong><strong><em>Dr Harlan Cloete is an extraordinary lecturer at the School of Public Leadership at Stellenbosch University. His main research interest is exploring effective and ineffective HRD governance systems in the public sector with a keen interest in local government</em></strong><strong>.</strong><strong> </strong><strong><em>He</em></strong><strong><em>  </em></strong><strong><em>serves as chairman of </em></strong><strong><em> </em></strong><strong><em>community radio KC 107.7</em></strong><strong><em> .</em></strong></p><p>​<br></p>