African Doctoral Academy
Welcome to Stellenbosch University

Workshop information

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Please click on thecourse you would like to read more about.​​

​Course 1: ​Creating a successful dissertation

Course 2: Preparing for the PhD: A road map for your dissertation

Course 3: Conducting original research in unique multicultural and multilingual settings​(NEW)

Course 4: Introduction to quantitative research design and methodology

Course 5: Introduction to qualitative research design and methodology

Course 6: Introduction to SPSS

Course 7: Essentials for 'R' - and introduction

Course 8: Grant writing fundamentals

Course 9: Introduction to systematic reviews(NEW)

Course 10: Project management principles: Planning and execution for your PhD

Course 11: Introduction to the design and execution of real world experimental and intervention studies(NEW)

Course 12: Intersecting qualitative with mixed methods research, design and implementation(NEW)

Course 13: Designing, doing and publishing Case Studies

Course 14: The digital scholar

Course 15: Doctoral supervision for novice supervisors

Course 16: Writing and publishing and article during the final phases of the PhD

Course 17: Introduction to qualitative data analysis with ATLAS.ti


Course 1: Creating a successful dissertation

​Presenters​
​Dr Layla Cassim - Layla Cassim ERS Consultants
​Cost
​Flat rate of R4 500 + R350 for prescribed Toolkit. 
​Prescribed material
​Postgraduate Toolkit, a roadmap for your postgraduate studies - by Dr Layla Cassim. 
​Capacity
​25 Delegates (waiting list forming)
​Format

​This preparatory course overlaps to a large extent with the course Preparing for the PhD, co-presented by Dr Cassim and Dr Herman in the first week of the Summer School, and can be seen as a condensed version of this valuable workshop. We have decided to offer this course before the Doctoral School formally starts, so delegates that want to attend Research Design Courses in the first week can also do so.
​Target audience
​Delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently or are in the early phase of their PhD and want to understand the background and context of the doctoral process. Delegates who are preparing for a research degree or project. If you think that you would benefit from further lectures in managing the supervisor relationship, building resilience and publishing from the PhD, please consider Preparing for the PhD in week 1. 
​What to bring
​The course will include lectures, exercises and group work. Participants are encouraged to bring their own writing to the workshop but it is not compulsory. Each participant and his/her writing will be treated confidentially and with respect.

This three-day workshop covers the entire research process, and each day builds on what was covered the previous day.  The three-day format below allows us to cover a considerable amount of content as well as giving us sufficient time for group work, feedback and individual interactions.  Participants also receive a copy of the Postgraduate Toolkit – the Toolkit and the workshop reinforce each other, and participants can refer to the Toolkit chapters and voice recordings to revisit what was covered in the workshop.  

Day 1: The research proposal
On day 1, we cover the fundamentals of research – what research is, ethical considerations in research, the importance of narrowing down the scope of the research project, defining key terminology (such as the research question, problem statement, aims and objectives) and the importance of a well-conceptualised research proposal.  We look at the structure of a comprehensive research proposal, with each component covered in detail.  In the afternoon, there is a group exercise, in which participants are asked to formulate key components of a research proposal, present this and are given feedback.

Day 2: Research design and methodology
Now that we have the basics in place, on day 2 we spend the whole day looking at research design and methodology.  We define what this is, look at the importance of effective record keeping, as well as different types of data and commonly used research methods.  It is emphasised that participants need to be able to rationalise why they have selected certain methods.  We also cover key concepts that examiners are likely to raise, such as sampling, error, bias, reliability, validity and pilot testing.  We also take a quick look at data analysis, both quantitative and qualitative.  We go through an example of a comprehensive research design and methodology chapter, so that participants have a framework within which to structure and plan for their research design and methodology.  Project management principles in research are also covered.  In the afternoon, participants go back into their groups from the previous day, make changes in the light of the feedback that has been received and then take the exercise further and develop a detailed research design and methodology.  It is interesting to note how the group projects evolve over the two days of the workshop.

Day 3: Thesis writing
We start the day by looking at important initial considerations, such as when to start writing, institutional requirements regarding the thesis, the process of editing, writer’s block and other problems that students may have, which may act as stumbling blocks to the completion of the thesis.  Then we look at different structures of a thesis, what goes where and how to write the different chapters or sections.  Special emphasis is placed on writing a high quality literature review.  We then cover university requirements relating to thesis submission, and examiners’ expectations.  We go through a typical examiner’s form, so that participants can ensure that they have covered these aspects in their theses.  We also look at common mistakes in academic writing that students make when writing their theses.  This list is based on what I have noticed when editing more than 250 theses, papers and reports across different disciplines.  There is a detailed consideration of the thesis examination process, what can go wrong in this and how to address examiners’ feedback.
​Presenters
​Dr Layla Cassim - Layla Cassim ERS Consultants
Dr Nicoline Herman, Deputy Director of the Centre for Teaching and Learning, SU
​Costs
​Early Bird Rate: R7 000+ R350 for prescribed Toolkit. 
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000 + R350  for prescribed Toolkit
​Prescribed material
​Postgraduate Toolkit, a roadmap for your postgraduate studies - by Dr Layla Cassim. 
​Capacity
​25 delegates
​Target audience
​Delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently or are in the early phase of their PhD and want to understand the background and context of the doctoral process. Delegates who are preparing for a research degree or project.
The course also places a focus on creating resilience for PhD candidates, developing and identiy key to doctoral studies, as well as planning to publish from the PhD. Another important aspect covered in this course is supervisory roles and maintaining good a good relationship with your supervisor - one of the most important a postgraduate student will have in their lives.
​What to bring
​The course will include lectures, exercises and group work. Participants are encouraged to bring their own writing to the workshop but it is not compulsory. Each participant and his/her writing will be treated confidentially and with respect.

This workshop is co-presented by our seasoned lecturers in postgraduate student success and has two distinct sessions.

Dr Layla Cassim
This part of the workshop will be an intensive session on the practicalities of getting started with your degree. This three-day workshop covers the research process, and each day builds on what was covered the previous day.  The three-day format below allows us to cover a considerable amount of content as well as giving us sufficient time for group work, feedback and individual interactions.  Participants also receive a copy of the Postgraduate Toolkit – the Toolkit and the workshop reinforce each other, and participants can refer to the Toolkit chapters and voice recordings to revisit what was covered in the workshop.  

The research proposal
During this part of the workshop, we cover the fundamentals of research – what research is, ethical considerations in research, the importance of narrowing down the scope of the research project, defining key terminology (such as the research question, problem statement, aims and objectives) and the importance of a well-conceptualised research proposal.  We look at the structure of a comprehensive research proposal, with each component covered in detail.  In the afternoon, there is a group exercise, in which participants are asked to formulate key components of a research proposal, present this and are given feedback.

Research design and methodology
Now that we have the basics in place, on the second day we spend the whole day looking at research design and methodology.  We define what this is, look at the importance of effective record keeping, as well as different types of data and commonly used research methods.  It is emphasised that participants need to be able to rationalise why they have selected certain methods.  We also cover key concepts that examiners are likely to raise, such as sampling, error, bias, reliability, validity and pilot testing.  We also take a quick look at data analysis, both quantitative and qualitative.  We go through an example of a comprehensive research design and methodology chapter, so that participants have a framework within which to structure and plan for their research design and methodology.  Project management principles in research are also covered.  In the afternoon, participants go back into their groups from the previous day, make changes in the light of the feedback that has been received and then take the exercise further and develop a detailed research design and methodology.  It is interesting to note how the group projects evolve over the two days of the workshop.

Thesis writing
We start the day by looking at important initial considerations, such as when to start writing, institutional requirements regarding the thesis, the process of editing, writer’s block and other problems that students may have, which may act as stumbling blocks to the completion of the thesis.  Then we look at different structures of a thesis, what goes where and how to write the different chapters or sections.  Special emphasis is placed on writing a high quality literature review.  We then cover university requirements relating to thesis submission, and examiners’ expectations.  We go through a typical examiner’s form, so that participants can ensure that they have covered these aspects in their theses.  We also look at common mistakes in academic writing that students make when writing their theses.  This list is based on what I have noticed when editing more than 100 theses across different disciplines.  There is a detailed consideration of the thesis examination process, what can go wrong in this and how to address examiners’ feedback.

Dr Nicoline Herman
During the two book-end sessions of the workshop (Monday and Friday), Dr Herman who is the facilitator of a monthly PhD discussion group for support staff at SU undertaking PhD studies with an educational research focus, will deal with the following concepts:

Resilience and Academic writing
  • Introduction to doctoral studies
  • Identity development as key to doctoral studies
  • Dealing with the PhD
  • Introduction to academic writing
  • Publishing from​ the PhD - structuring your research for publication from the start.


This part of the worksho​p focusses on roles and relationships, and closes with some thoughts about staying the course during your doctoral studies.

  • Supervisory roles and relationships
  • How to select a supervisor 
  • Resilience in y​our studies

The cours​e will include lectures, exercises and group work. The Toolkit and class notes will be distributed during the classes.


Course 3: Conducting original research in unique multicultural and multilingual settings​ ​

​​​​
​Preseter​
Dr Michael D. Fetters, MD, MPH, MA, Professor of Family Medicine, Co-Director of Mixed Methods Program, and, Founder and Director, Japanese Family Health Program at the University of Michigan​
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity
​20 delegates
​Requirements
​Participants will benefit most if they have a planned or active project in multicultural, multilingual or cross-cultural settings.  
​Target audience
​Graduate students interested in conducting research in unique cultural settings
The target audience is for this workshop graduate students interested in conducting research in unique cultural settings. This course aims to share best practices when conducting unique research in multicultural and multilingual settings with delegates.

The course objectives are to:
  1. understand the foundational concepts relative to conducting research in unique cultural settings.
  2. how to adapt an existing survey instrument culturally for use in unique multicultural and multilingual cultural setting.
  3. how to conduct observations in unique multicultural and multilingual cultural settings.
  4. how to construct an interview guide for use in a unique cultural settings.
  5. what process to use to enter and analyse qualitative data unique cultural settings.

There will be a focus on the understanding of such setting, identifying one’s own world view and cultural inventory and how researchers should prepare for, and adapt themselves for the undertaking of research.

Course Outcomes:
The target audience for this workshop is: doctoral level candidates interested in conducting research in unique cultural settings

After attending this course, participants will be able to:
1)Understand the foundational concepts relative to conducting research in unique multicultural and multilingual cultural settings
  • Understanding the concept of culture
  • Ethical Perspectives​
2)Culturally adapt an existing survey instrument for use in different cultural settings
  • why the survey is being done
  • choosing the language of the instrument
  • dealing with translation and sampling considerations

3)Conduct observations in the different cultural settings
  • What kind of observations can be used?
  • Using media
  • Permission issues

4)Construct an interview guide for use in a unique cultural settings
  • Data collection
  • Guide to interview development and conducting

5)Enter and analyse qualitative data unique cultural settings
  • When to analyse information
  • Transcribing and translating
  • Data Analysis​

C​ourse 4: Introduction to quantitative research design and methodology

​PresenterProf Timothy C Guetterman, PhD, - University of Michigan, Ann Arbour, USA
​CostEarly Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity​30 Delegates
​RequirementsParticipants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is critical to come with an idea for a research project and topic. We will refine and work on it throughout the course.
​Target audiance
This course will benefit delegates who want to learn more about quantitative research design and methods. It is idea for students who are at the early phases of their PhD, who can actively develop their proposal through the course. Delegates planning a quantitative research study will benefit. The course is highly interdisciplinary, as is the instructor, and will use examples from the education, social, and health sciences conducted across locations.

Introduction to Quantitative Research Design is an introductory course to develop foundational quantitative research design knowledge and skills. Quantitative research may be broadly defined as an inquiry approach useful for describing trends and explaining the relationship among variables generally through collecting and analyzing numeric, closed-ended data.

The primary expectation is that delegates will work on their project and exit with the building blocks of a quantitative research design. As a group, we will actively work on the major aspects of quantitative research designs, including the statement of the problem; purpose statements, research questions, or hypotheses; a specific quantitative design; data collection and analysis plans; and limitations.

At the completion of the course, students will have skills to:
  • Understand the process of conducting research using a quantitative approach
  • Plan a research design
  • Specify a quantitative purpose, research question, or hypothesis
  • Understand the types of quantitative research designs including
    • Survey design
    • Correlational design
    • Causal comparative design
    • Quasi-experimental/ Experimental designs
  • Know how to select a research design
  • Plan quantitative data collection procedures
  • Understand threats to validity in quantitative research
Class notes and readings will be provided.

​PresenterProf Wayne A Babchuk, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
​CostEarly Bird Rate: R7 000 + R450 for Textbook.
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000 + R450 for Textbook
​TextbookMerriam, S., & Tisdell, E.J. (2016). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation (4th ed.). San Francisco: John Wiley and Sons.
Capacity   
​Capacity​30 Delegates
​RequirementsParticipants are expected to have a general broad-based knowledge of the process of research whether that be a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed or multi-methods orientation.
​Target audience
This course will benefit participants who want to learn more about and fine-tune their skills in qualitative design and implementation. The course will have a strong holistic and interdisciplinary focus and draw upon examples from the social and health sciences and education over time and across cultures.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Design and Methodology is an introductory course presented in two parts.

Part 1 provides fundamental knowledge of three interlocking aspects of the research enterprise:
  • the history of qualitative research across disciplines,
  • the ethics and responsible conduct of research, and
  • the epistemological or philosophical assumptions underlying qualitative designs.

We then systematically compare key attributes and procedures of widely utilized qualitative approaches including basic qualitative research, narrative, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, grounded ethnography, case study, and participatory action research.

Part 2 extends our understanding of these approaches as participants learn more about the practice of qualitative research. As an engaged community of learners, we will focus on core processes of qualitative design and implementation: writing problem statements, purpose statements, and research questions, sampling strategies, interviewing and participant observation, and data analysis. We will also discuss assessment, validation, and writing reports for diverse audiences. This course will draw upon examples from participants’ own research interests that we will hone through collaborative problem-solving and instructional techniques. Upon completion of this course, participants will gain a deeper understanding of qualitative research and will have refined and practiced the skills needed to design and conduct their own studies.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of the course, the participants will have insight into

Important themes and scholars that define the history of qualitative research over time and across disciplines
  • Ethics and the responsible conduct of research
  • Philosophical or epistemological assumptions undergirding qualitative research
  • Principles and practices of contemporary approaches to qualitative research (i.e., basic qualitative research, narrative, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, grounded ethnography, case study, and participatory action research)
  • Designing qualitative research studies (purpose, sample, research questions)
  • Qualitative interviewing skills, participant observation, and other data collection techniques
  • Strategies of qualitative data analysis
  • Evaluating, writing, and publishing qualitative research
Course material will consist of notes distirbuted during the class, a 'reader' hosted online and further texts.
Back to top

Course 6: Introduction to SPSS

Presenter​ Dr Cindy Lee Steenekamp - Director Graduate School of Arts and Social Sciences; Centre for International and Comparative Politics, SU
​CostEarly Bird Rate: R7 000.
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity25 delegates
​RequirementsDelegates must be computer literate and competent to register for this course.
​SoftwareThe SPSS classroom is equipped with computers which provide delegates with the latest version of SPSS. A license for the SPSS package for private use is not included in the price of the workshop and must either be purchased or provided by delegates or their institution if they wish to make use of the software. Please note that we cannot accommodate private laptops in the class.
​Target audience
Postgraduate students, supervisors and researchers interested in acquiring quantitative research skills and techniques. This course is especially useful for participants who make use of surveys or want to conduct secondary data analysis based on survey research.

During this course, participants will be introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) – one of the most widely used social statistical packages in the world. It needs to be emphasized that this is an introductory course, ideally suited for first time users or participants with limited experience with the software program. Participants should be computer literate and competent as this is a computer-based course with an emphasis on skills transfer. This short course focuses specifically on the knowledge and skills required for quantitative data analysis. The broad objectives of this course are to provide participants with an understanding of the logic of quantitative data analysis and to give participants the opportunity to develop the practical computer skills required for data analysis.

Course Outcomes:
When delegates have completed this course they should:
  • Be familiar with the layout and basic functioning of SPSS
  • Be able to create and maintain a database
  • Be able to do a summary analysis of a data set - produce frequencies, descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and comparison of means
  • Be able to manipulate data - recode, treat missing values and construct a variable
  • Be able to graphically illustrate data using a variety of chart options
  • Be able to interpret and present the ensuing results
  • The following aspects are covered:
    • Levels of measurement, creating and editing a data file, transporting a file from Excel
    • Univariate and bivariate analyses
    •  Frequencies, descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations
    • Inspecting variables
    • Recoding variables, missing values, computing variables, selecting cases and splitting files
    • Graphs
Course material: Class slides; homework exercises and homework memo. No prescribed textbook.

The course will include formal lectures in the computer lab every morning and informal computer lab components every afternoon for participants to complete the course exercises.
Back to top

Course 7: Essentials for 'R' - and introduction

​Presenter Koen Plevoets, KU Leuven​, Belgium
​CostEarly Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity​35 Delegates (waiting list forming)
​RequirementsThere are no prerequisites, but previous knowledge about basic mathematical and statistical principles (e.g., vectors, descriptive statistics) is recommended for the introduction in statistical techniques.
​Target audience
This course is meant for everyone who is motivated to use the R programming language for their professional/research activities.


This course gives an introduction to the use of the statistical software language R. R is a programming language for data analysis and graphics. In five sessions of four hours, the participants will learn the basics of R. This is a hands-on course with practical assignments.

The course includes:
    • An introduction to the software package R
    • Different data structures in R
    • Importing data in R
    • Writing your own functions
    • Making basic graphics in R
    • Performing some basic descriptive analysis in R
    • Performing some basic inference tests in R (i.e., testing independence, proportions, t-tests, regression analysis)

At the end of the course participants should be able to start and perform an analysis by themselves and, in case they need something fancy, they can find out where to get help.

Back to top


Course 8: Grant writing fundamentals

​​This course take place on Saturday 07 July 2018

​PresenterMs Riana Coetsee - Division of Research Development, SU
​CostFlat rate of R1200
​Capacity​20 Delegates
​RequirementsParticipants should be busy with research, be it at postgraduate or postdoctoral level or in full-time academic staff capacity.
​Target audience
Researchers (including postgraduate students and postdocs) who need to generate research funds.

Although funding organisations and their application requirements differ, there are important elements expected from all funding agencies, whether it relates to small or to large grants.  The following elements will be thus be discussed and practised in the workshop:

  • Basic structure of grant proposal
  • Why grant proposals fail
  • The core components of a grant proposal
  • Why writing style matters
  • The budget
  • Where to look for funding
  • Explaining peer review panels

Course Outcomes:
Participants will understand the following:

  • What basic and core components an application should have to make it competitive
  • What pitfalls should be avoided when writing grant proposals
  • What elements should be included in the budget
  • Where to start looking for funding

Course material: Notes on what will be presented in the workshop, as well as additional reading material

Back to top


Course 9: Introduction to systematic reviews

This course take place on Saturday 07 July 2018

​Presenter​Dr Lara Skelly, University of Stellenbosch Business School
​Cost​Flat rate of R1200
​Capacity​15 (waiting list forming)
​Requirements​Own laptop with Mendeley desktop already installed
Target audience
​This course is meant for post-graduate students who are looking to do a systematic review, or post-graduate students who are struggling to deal with enormous quantities of literature.


Creation of a research question, identification of constructs and appropriate keywords, advanced guidance on research databases, and introduction to Mendeley.

At the end of the course, participants should be able to conduct a systematic review and use Mendeley to do so.

Back to top


Course 10: Project management principles: Planning and execution for your PhD

This course take place on Saturday 07 July 2018

​PresenterDr Joubert van Eeden, Department of Industrial Engineering, SU
​Cost​Flat rate of R1200
​Capacity​30 Delegates (waiting list forming)
​Target audience
Researchers who are preparing for or have recently started with an individual research projects (PhD, Masters or other).


The course will provide participants insight into the following aspects of project management: project management theory; scope management; stakeholder engagement; quality management; time management;  risk management; project control and progress monitoring.

The course has a specific focus on individual research projects for participants that are involved in research towards a degree.

Course Outcomes:
  • Understand how the basic principles of project management relates to individual research projects
  • Argue the importance of time management within research project delivery and describe the cost and quality interdependency
  • Plan a research project at a high level and provide a clear scope statement and project plan
  • Be able to apply the basic risk management process to rank and mitigate risk on research projects
  • Have the ability to compile a (brief) report on project progress against defined key milestones

Course material: Notes will be provided.

Back to top


Course 11: Introduction to the design and execution of real world experimental and intervention studies

​Presenter​Professor Catherine Comiskey - School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin University, Ireland
​CostEarly Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity​20 delegates
​Requirements
​Participants should have an interest in, and a basic knowledge of quantitative research.  This course will be most beneficial to those who have a specific research project planned in the area of prevention or intervention within a real world community, education, social or healthcare setting.

The course will be interdisciplinary and will focus on practical examples and workshops where students can develop their own project work with hands on input from the facilitator. Students will be encouraged to use the time and their learning to write or develop grant and tender applications relevant to their project.
​Target audience
​This course will benefit those who plan to undertake and evaluate an intervention or prevention study using an experimental or quasi-experimental design.

The facilitator will directly respond to the needs of the participants and the stage they are at in their research careers.
A range of facilitation approaches will be used including formal lectures, workshops, videos and class presentations.


The following topics will be covered

  • Review of  basic quantitative study designs (survey, correlational, causal)
  •  Gold standards, experimental and quasi-experimental designs (randomised control trials (RCT’s),  pragmatic RCT’s and observational studies)
  • Chosen design and level of measurement
  • Data collection methods and data types
  • Sampling and the sample frame
  • Sample size determination and power analysis
  • Writing a logical data analysis plan
  • Reporting on results and using writing guides (Consort guidelines and Strobe checklists)
  • A note on the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of experimental and quasi-experimental research
  • Introduction to the role of Implementation Science when conducting an intervention or prevention study (fidelity in implementation, enablers and barriers to implementation)


Course outcomes    
    At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • Describe an appropriate experimental or quasi-experimental design for an intervention or prevention study
  • Conduct a power analysis and decide how many cases/participants are required within a study
  • Describe and defend their choice of sample selection
  • Write an appropriate data analysis plan for their study design
  • Understand and write a statement on the philosophical underpinnings and the theoretical framework to their study
  • Write a report on their study in line with the Consort or Strobe guidelines
  • Address the implementation of  their intervention or prevention study
  • Summarise and critically analyse  related studies
  • Understand and know where to access additional resources for their studies

Back to top


Course 12: Intersecting qualitative with mixed methods research, design and implementation

​Presenters​Prof Wayne A. Babchuk, PhD - University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Prof Timothy C. Guetterman, PhD - University of Michigan
​CostEarly Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity​25 Delegates (waiting list forming)
​Requirement​Participants are expected to have had some previous exposure or training in research methodology—preferably with a qualitative and/or mixed methods focus--either through courses offered by their own home institutions or by the African Doctoral Academy, or have had some related experience working with qualitative or mixed methods designs prior to this course.
​Target audience
​This course is designed to help guide doctoral students or other more advanced researchers who are in the process of planning or conducting qualitative or mixed methods studies for their dissertations or other research projects.


Advanced Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research Design and Application will begin with a concise overview of qualitative and mixed methods research. Qualitative research is a systematic process of inquiry that relies on open-ended data (e.g., text, forms of interviews, focus groups, and images) and emphasizes inductive reasoning, collecting data in natural settings, and understanding participants’ points of view. Mixed methods research involves the integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a study. While basic research may rely on general descriptive qualitative research, the most rigorous research employs qualitative designs. Therefore, we focus on the major qualitative designs—ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, case study, and narrative research—in detail and discuss their intersection with mixed methods research.

The primary expectation is that delegates will bring either a qualitative or mixed methods project (either concept or in progress) and work on their project. Delegates will exit with the foundation of a sophisticated qualitative or mixed methods research design.

Course outcomes    
At the completion of the course, students will have skills to:

  • Understand how to apply mixed methods research
  • Design and implement the key procedures of five major qualitative designs: ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, case study, and narrative research
  • Identify, for each design,
    • its definition
    • how it has been used
    • its potential intersection with mixed methods
    • strategies for designing and conducting a study
    • unique ethical considerations
    • advantages, limitations, and challenges
    • validation strategies
  • Know how to select an appropriate research design
  • Apply criteria to evaluate research  
  • Recognize writing strategies for reporting and publication

Back to top


Course 13: Designing, doing and publishing Case Studies

​PresenterProf Michael Gibbert, University of Lugano, Switzerland.
​Cost​Early Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity​12 Delegates
​RequirementsDelegates who use qualitative methods exclusively, as well as those who use them in mixed methods designs or based on outliers and critical cases are welcome. In addition, ethnographic researchers as well as those interested in grounded theory will find the course helpful in designing rigorous research processes. The workshop’s hands-on/brains-on approach requires students to bring their own research problems, irrespective of the stage they may find themselves in (design, data collection, data analysis, or write-up phase). The important thing is that delegates do have a concrete research problem and initial empirical inclinations to share.
​Target audience
The course is aimed at PhD students and junior faculty members who intend to use, or are already using, the case‐study method for research purposes in the administrative sciences (broadly defined). The course has a limited capacity so as to maximise both the benefits for individual delegates and the interaction between delegates and Prof Gibbert. In fact, the title ‘workshop’ describes the pedagogy better than ‘course’. The approach is hands-on, as well as brains-on, in that we work on the concrete research problems delegates are invited to bring to the course.



The fundamental difference between case studies and other (quantitative) methods is that in case studies, there are more variables than data points. This difference makes case studies very "rich", but has also led to a good deal of criticism about the rigor of the case study method, particularly in terms of validity and reliability.

Specific course elements are the following:
We take a problem-oriented approach to rigorous case study designs. That is, we start from the various issues irrespective of the stage of the research process and develop a toolkit for addressing these issues. The workshop is highly interactive, as we work on both published best (and worst) practices to inform delegates’ own practices. The aim is to understand how to conduct and write up rigorous case study research which will get published.

Course Outcomes:
The following themes are covered during the course:
The case study method in the social sciences: Origin, rationale & applications:

  • Case studies vs. quantitative methods
  • Publishing qualitative research


Designing case‐study research: Two (complimentary) approaches

  • Yin’s design‐approach
  • Gerring’s design approach


Doing case‐study research (I): Selecting cases & theory testing

  • Selection bias
  • How (not) to address selection bias


Doing case‐study research (II): Replication logic, deviant cases, data collection & analysis for theory building

  • Data collection practices & quality criteria
  • Internal validity in qualitative data analysis


Publishing case study research: Persuasion & pyramid principle

  • Logic and structure in writing up

Course material: A reader will be provided online, with class notes to be distributed during the sessions.

Back to top


Course 14: The digital scholar​

​Presenters​

​​​​​Prof Wim van Petegem (KU Leuven)  
Dr JP Bosman (US)
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity
​​15 Delegates
​Requirement
Participants should have a genuine interest in modern multimedia technologies and their application in research and education. Some basic experience with the use and/or production of multimedia materials or affinity with social media might be helpful in the practical sessions.

It is strongly recommended for the participants to bring their own devices (laptop, smartphone,…) to make use of them during the course.​
​Target audience
​The course is designed for the Digital Scholar of the future, i.e. PhD students and graduates from all disciplines, starting lecturers, or more senior academics, with a keen interest in digital technologies. Participants want to further develop their skills on how to drive project websites, how to use social media, how to set up a personal blog on their academic activities, how to visualize research outcomes or learning analytics, how to cope with fast moving new trends in multimedia technology for research and teaching, how to develop multimedia learning materials, etc.


The course is based around the following framework: 



The whole course will be immersed in the idea of cumulative knowledge building and representation through multimedia communication.

The course will concentrate around the following themes: 
  • Understanding the digital scholar concept,
  • Making your research felt on the web, 
  • Creating interactive multimedia materials, 
  • Coping with new multimedia technology in research and teaching.The whole course will be immersed in the idea of cumulative knowledge building and representation through multimedia communication. 

The course will include presentations of theoretical evidence-based concepts, models and frameworks, good practices, inspiring examples, practical illustrations, and interesting (open) resources, combined with some hands-on exercises. Together with the instructors participants will engage in a co-creation process and will start to build their own digital scholarly presence on the web during the course.

Furthermore, guest lectures by local experts will be provided on certain aspects of the course, either face-to-face or online.

Course Outcomes
  • After completion of the course, the participants will:
  • Be able to represent and further their own, as well as research teams’ research projects on the web
  • Better understand cumulative knowledge building and representation as a framework to integrate research and teaching
  • Be aware of the huge potential of emerging and multimedia technologies for research and teaching
  • Be able to use multimedia and social media in research and teaching
Course Materials: The course material will comprise slide sets, readings and journal articles, on-line tutorials, manuals, video material, provided in the sessions, and partly co-created by the participants themselves.

Some on-line textbooks or references that partly cover the topic of this course are:

Course 15: Doctoral supervision for novice supervisors​​

​Presenter
​Prof Jan Botha - The Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology (CREST), SU
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 000 + R400 textbook
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000 + R400 textbook
​Capacity
​30 Delegates
​Textbook
​Mouton, J. 2001. How to succeed in your master's and doctoral studies: A South African guide and resource book. Pretoria: Van Schaik Publishers.
​Requirement
​Delegates must already have a PhD (or be graduating in the next few months) in order to participate in the workshop.


The Doctoral Supervision course is an accredited short course at the University of Stellenbosch. The University will issue a Certificate of Competence to delegates who complete and submit all the assignments and meet the assessment criteria.

The focus of the course is on the PhD as knowledge production accompanied by the appropriate pedagogical principles and practices. Insights based on up-to-date research on doctoral education underpin the course. Theoretical and practical dimensions of doctoral supervision are blended in the presentations and activities.  Delegates will have the opportunity to do hands-on exercises, participate in group work, and work on projects related to the supervision of their own PhD students.  Delegates will also have opportunities to interact with experienced supervisors in different disciplines.

The course will cover topics such as:
  • The context of doctoral supervision in Africa
  • The nature of the PhD-qualification
  • Roles and responsibilities of supervisors
  • Models and styles of supervision
  • Joint or co-supervision
  • Research integrity
  • The process of supervision (guidance, feedback and assessment)
  • Supervising the development of the research proposal
  • The literature review
  • The examination of PhD theses
A reader with key readings and class notes will be provided online and/or printed and distributed during the classes.​

Course 16: Writing and publishing and article during the final phases of the PhD​

​Presenters​

​Dr Ruth Albertyn - Centre for Higher and Adult Education, SU

Dr Christel Troskie-De Bruin - Centre for Higher and Adult Education, SU
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 500
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 500
Capacity​​16 Delegates (The size of the class is kept purposefully small, so delegates have optimal time with their facilitator)  (waiting list forming)
​Requirements
​Participants must have the following in place before the course commences:
  • The first rough draft of an article based on completed research (for example completed data analysis or completed section of the literature review)
  • Identified a journal where you would like to submit an article
  • The guidelines for authors of this journal
  • A laptop to use during the workshop (not only a tablet or iPad)
  • Power cables and adaptor for laptop.

​Target audience
​This course is aimed at doctoral candidates who have already begun their doctoral research project and are at a stage where they have completed a section of their work and have some publishable material. It is essential that the data has already been analysed or the literature already collected. The focus of this workshop is on actual writing of the article during the workshop (hands-on).​


During this hands-on course, participants plan and write an article for publication in a scholarly journal. Participants work on material from their doctoral studies and it is essential for this workshop to have a draft manuscript to work on during your time with the ADA. Input is provided by the facilitator and participants then craft their article with one-on-one discussion and feedback from facilitators during the writing process.

Course Outcomes: 
After completion of the course, the participant will have a completed article which can be submitted for consideration by the intended journal. Throughout the week:
  • Input is provided on each section of the article
  • Participants write the relevant section
  • Facilitator reads work and provides feedback
  • Participants redraft before writing the next section of the article
  • Course material: A reading consisting of key readings that will be distributed during the class.

Course 17: Introduction to qualitative data analysis with ATLAS.ti​​

​​Presenter
​Prof Brigitte Smit - UNISA
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 000
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 000
​Capacity
​30 Delegates
​Requirements
​You should already be familiar with the basic concepts of social research and be computer literate and competent in order to register for this course.
​Target audience
​This course is interesting for all those who want to learn about a tool that can support them during their literature review stage in their research and for those who plan to work with qualitative data like interview or focus group transcripts, field nodes, reports, images or videos. ATLAS.ti is a tool that supports the process of analysing such data.

This course will feature version 8 of ATLAS.ti, which was released in December 2016. Version 8 is not just a regular upgrade. It is re-programmed from scratch and has a whole new look and feel to it. For those familiar with ATLAS.ti, you will find elements that are familiar like the editor displaying your data on the left hand side and the codings on the right hand side in the margin area. The overall program handling however will be different as ribbons are introduced (instead of menus) – and of course there will be new tools like being able to import data from reference manages like Mendeley, Evernotes and Twitter. Thus, for those already familiar with an older version of ATLAS.ti might also find this course valuable.
Software
​This course will feature version 8 of ATLAS.ti, which was released in December 2016. The classes are presented in a fully equipped computer laboratory (classroom) and personal laptops cannot be accommodated. Please note that the course fee does not include the software. However, if you are a student, you can purchase the software at a discounted price via the ATLAS.ti website. ​


​​This is an introductory course dealing with qualitative data analysis (QDA) using a software programme called ATLAS.ti. Participants will be introduced to the range of qualitative data analysis types. You will learn the technical side of handling and working with qualitative data in ATLAS.t. As a practical use case, you will be shown how this software programme can be utilised to assist with your literature review and how to analyse twitter data.


Specific course elements are the following:
  • Introduction to qualitative data analysis
  • Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS)

Interface
  • Finding your way around: Getting to know the ATLAS.ti User Interface

Project Management
  • How to set up a project / Working with various data types

Coding:                
  • ​Technical aspects of coding
  • Methodological aspects of coding: how to build an efficient coding schema


Use case

  • Using ATLAS.ti for your literature review
  • Working with Endnote

While we are going through the use cases, you will be introduced to various other functions like writing comments and memos, simple analytic tools and the network view function.

Course Outcomes 
Participating in the course will enable you to begin to work with the software and to utilise it for your own research project.

Course material: A reader with PowerPoint slides and readings will be supplied.​​

​​