African Doctoral Academy
Welcome to Stellenbosch University

Workshop information

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Please click on the course you would like to read more about.​​​​

​​​​​​​Course 1: Preparing for the PhD: Considerations and planning your research project

Course 2: Design and analysis of experimental data

Course 3: Introduction to Quantitative research design and methodology

Course 4: Introduction to Qualitative research design and methodology  

Course 5Essentials for R

Course 6: Data management and working with Quantitative Data (NEW!)

Course 7: Design your academic future​ (NEW!)

Course 8: Grounded Theory: Methodology, principles and practices  (NEW!)

Course 9: Confident public speaking

Course 10: Good research practice: Research ethics and beyond

Course 11Fundamentals of publishing

Course 12: Grant writing fundamentals

Course 13: MAXQDA Software for Qualitative and Mixed Methods analysis  (NEW!)

Course 14: Scientific Communication: How to write an article, present a poster, design slides and give an oral presentation

Course 15: The Productive PhD: Creating structure, gaining clarity & overcoming blocks

Course 16: Advanced Qualitative research design and methodology  (NEW!)​​​

Course 17: Teaching in the digital world: The use of blended active learning strategies

Course 18: Introduction to SPSS

Course 19: Mixed Methods research design

Course 20: Writing and publishing an article during the final phases of the PhD

Course 21: Introduction to ATLAS.ti for qualitative data analysis​



Course 1: Preparing for your PhD: Considerations and planning your research project

​Presenters​
​Dr Layla Cassim - Layla Cassim ERS Consultants CC
​Dr Nicoline Herman - Centre for Teaching and Learning, Stellenbosch University​
​Duration
5 days​
6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550 + R400 for prescribed Toolkit  
SU staff and stude​nts paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 500 + R400 for prescribed Toolkit​
​Prescribed material
​Postgraduate Toolkit on DVD (3rd edition) - developed by Dr Layla Cassim
​​Requirements
​​There are no prerequisite requirements for this course, as it is a preparatory course aimed at providing delegates with the background and context of the doctoral process.
​Target audience
​Delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently or who are in the early phase of their PhD and want to understand the background and context of the doctoral process. Delegates who are preparing for a research degree or project.
​Focus disciplines
​​All disciplines are welcome to attend.

Course Description

Dr Nicoline Herman

During the two book-end sessions of the workshop (Monday and Friday), the following aspects will be covered by Dr Herman:

Monday: Introduction to doctoral studies

  • Positioning yourself within the doctoral landscape
  • Aligning your own goals and ideals with the criteria of a successful PhD
  • Reflecting on your own doctoral journey: experienced or envisaged
  • Exploring identity development as key to doctoral studies
  • Selecting a supervisor and exploring different supervisory roles
  • Building resilience in your studies

​Dr Layla Cassim

The middle three days of the workshop will be an intensive session on the practicalities of getting started with your degree. This three-day session covers the research process, and each day builds on what was covered the previous day.  The three-day format below allows us to cover a considerable amount of content as well as giving us sufficient time for group work, feedback and individual interactions.  Participants also receive a copy of the Postgraduate Toolkit – the Toolkit and the workshop reinforce each other, and participants can refer to the Toolkit chapters and voice recordings to revisit what was covered in the workshop. 

Tuesday: The research proposal

  •  The fundamentals of research
  • Key ethical considerations in research
  • Scope of the research project.
  • Structure of a comprehensive research proposal
  • Key terminology, such as the research question, problem statement, aims and objectives
  • The 'golden thread'​

Wednesday: Research design and methodology

  • Research design and methodology
  • Defining Research Design and Methodology
  • Developing a strong research design and methodology framework 
  • How examiners approach the methodology section on review
  • The importance of effective record keeping 
  • Different types of data and when to use them:
    • Primary and Secondary
    • Qualitative and Quantitative Data 
  • Commonly used research methods across a range of disciplines 
  • Rationalising your choice and methodology
  • Key concepts examiners might raise: 
    • Sampling, error, bias, reliability, validity and pilot testing
  • Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis 
  • Project management principles to structure and plan your research
  • Budgeting 

Thursday: Thesis writing

  • Writing your thesis
    • Important consideration and possible stumbling blocks: 
    •  When to start writing 
    •  Institutional requirements regarding the thesis 
    •  Editing process 
    •  Writer's block a
    •  Time management
    •  Stress, health and quality of life challenges, 
  • Thesis structure
    •  Which sections make up the thesis and how to write the different chapters and sections
  • Writing a quality literature review
  • Theoretical frameworks and how to incorporate them in the thesis 
  • Thesis examination process 
    •  University requirements
    •  Typical examiners' questions and dealing with feedback
    •  Common thesis writing mistakes ​

​Friday: Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Dr Herman)

  • Planning and conducting your research with a focus on dissemination: From the oral examination to the conference presentation to writing an article
  • Introducing academic writing
  • Publishing from your PhD

Course slides and relevant academic articles will be provided at the start of the workshop, as well as the Prescribed “Postgraduate Toolkit on DVD (3rd edition)”, developed by Dr Layla Cassim.


​​Course Outcomes

At the end of the course, the delegates will be able to:

Describe the PhD journey

  • Describe the role and importance of identity development in doctoral studies
  • Explain the notion and importance of 'doctorateness'
  • Articulate their individual needs in terms of selecting a supervisor as well as their expectations of a supervisor
  • Identify the requisites for being resilient and successful in their PhD journey
  • Complete a comprehensive, well conceptualised research proposal
  • Justify why they have used particular research methods, and show how these are appropriate for their research
  • Discuss what steps they have undertaken to decrease the potential for error and bias, and what they have done to increase the reliability and validity of their research
  • Have an interdisciplinary, intersectional understanding of research
  • Present their findings in a logical, user-friendly thesis format that meets the university's requirements for submission and that satisfies examiners
  • Address various quality of life challenges that can make it more difficult to complete the research project, such as time management, writer's block, stress and health-related problems
  • Explain the importance of structuring research with a focus on dissemination, from the start
  • Apply the basics of academic writing in own writing practices
  • Realise the importance of effectively sharing their research with various audiences utilising different platforms​​​

Course 2: Design and analysis of experimental data

​Presenters​
​Professor Catherine Comiskey - School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin University, Ireland
​Duration
5 days​
6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550  
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 500
​​Requirements
​Participants should have an interest in, and a basic knowledge of quantitative research. This course will be most beneficial to those who have a specific research project planned in the area of prevention or intervention within a real world, natural science, engineering, community, education, social or healthcare setting.
The course will be interdisciplinary and will focus on practical examples and workshops where students can develop their own project work with hands on input from the facilitator. Students will be encouraged to use the time and their learning to write or develop grant and tender applications relevant to their project.
​Target audience
​This course will benefit those who plan to undertake and evaluate an intervention or prevention study using an experimental or quasi-experimental design. The facilitator will directly respond to the needs of the participants and the stage they are at in their research careers. A range of facilitation approaches will be used including formal lectures, workshops, videos and class presentations.
​Focus Disciplines
​Natural Sciences, Engineering and Science-related fields, as well as community, education or healthcare settings.

Course Description
The following topics will be covered:
  • Review of  basic quantitative study designs
  • Gold standards, experimental and quasi-experimental designs (randomised control trials (RCT's),  pragmatic RCT's and observational studies)
  • Chosen design, level of measurement and key variables
  • Data collection methods and data types
  • Data analysis techniques for your data type, descriptive statistics, confidence  intervals, hypothesis testing correlation, t-tests, ANOVA, introduction to regression, Chi squared tests  
  • Sampling and the sample frame
  • Sample size determination and power analysis
  • Writing a logical data analysis plan
  • Reporting on results and using writing guides (Consort guidelines and Strobe checklists)
  • Writing an appropriate  data analysis plan Introduction to the role of Implementation Science when conducting an intervention or prevention study (fidelity in implementation, enablers and barriers to implementation)​
Course Outcomes
At the end of the course, the delegates will be able to:
  • ​Describe an appropriate experimental or quasi-experimental design for an intervention or prevention study
  • Conduct a power analysis and decide how many cases/participants are required within a study
  • Describe and defend their choice of sample selection
  • Write an appropriate data analysis plan including a statistical plan for their study design
  • Write a report on their study in line with the Consort or Strobe guidelines
  • Address the implementation of  their intervention or prevention study
  • Summarise and critically analyse  related studies
  • Understand and know where to access additional resources for their studies

The course materials will be made available on a learning hub, online. These will include readings and examples of published studies. Delegates will receive a hard copy of class slides.


Course 3: Introduction to Quantitative research design and methodology

Presenter​Prof Timothy C Guetterman - Creighton University, Omaha, USA
​​Duration
5 days​
6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00
​Cost 
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550 
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close​
Standard Rate: R8 500​

​RequirementsParticipants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is critical to come with an idea for a research project and topic. We will refine and work on it throughout the course.
​Target audience
This course will benefit delegates who want to learn more about quantitative research design and methods. It is idea for students who are at the early phases of their PhD, who can actively develop their proposal through the course. The course is highly interdisciplinary, as is the instructor, and will use examples from the education, social, and health sciences conducted across nations and settings. Those conducting natural sciences experiments may be better suited by an experimental design course.
​What to bring
​Please come with an idea for a research project or a research project underway. It may help to bring a laptop computer with power cord.
​Focus Displines
​​​​Social and Health Sciences, and Education

Course Description
Introduction to Quantitative Research Design is an introductory course to develop foundational quantitative research design knowledge and skills. Quantitative research may be broadly defined as an inquiry approach useful for describing trends and explaining the relationship among variables generally through collecting and analysing numeric, closed-ended data. 
The primary expectation is that delegates will work on their project and exit with the building blocks of a quantitative research design. As a group, we will actively work on the major aspects of quantitative research designs, including the statement of the problem; purpose statements, research questions, or hypotheses; a specific quantitative design; data collection and analysis plans; and limitations. The course will include live demonstrations of using statistical software for analysis. The instructor is available for individuals consultations for a period of time daily. 

Course Outcomes
At the completion of the course, students will have skills to:
  • Understand the process of conducting research using a quantitative approach
  • Specify a quantitative purpose, research question, or hypothesis
  • Understand the use of literature in quantitative research
  • Plan quantitative data collection procedures
  • Select appropriate statistical analyses
  • Understand how to interpret and read statistical output 
  • Understand the types of quantitative research designs including
    • Survey design
    • Correlational design
    • Quasi-experimental/ Experimental designs
  • Select and plan a research design
  • Understand threats to validity in quantitative research​

Course material include slides and readings, which will be made available as handouts.

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​​Presenters​
​Prof Wayne A Babchuk - University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA
Duration
5 days​
6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550 + R500 for prescribed Textbook
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500 + R500 for prescribed Textbook
​Requirements
Please come with an idea for a research project you are working on or planning on working on in the future. The course will involve inter-active discussions and feedback from the instructor and workshop participants.
​​Target audience
​This course will benefit participants who want to learn more about and fine-tune their skills in qualitative design and implementation. The course will have a strong holistic and interdisciplinary focus and draw upon examples from the social and health sciences and education over time and across cultures.
​Focus Disciplines
Social and Health sciences, and Education.  
​Textbook
​​Qualitative Research: A Guide to Design and Implementation, 4th Edition. Sharan B. Merriam, Elizabeth J. Tisdell.


Course Description
Introduction to Qualitative Research Design and Methodology is an introductory course presented in two parts. 
Part 1 provides fundamental knowledge of several interlocking topics important to our understanding of qualitative research methodology design and implementation including: 
  • the history of qualitative research across disciplines
  • the ethics and responsible conduct of research
  • the epistemological or philosophical assumptions underlying qualitative designs
  • key attributes and procedures of contemporary qualitative approaches including basic qualitative research, narrative, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, grounded ethnography, case study, and participatory action research.

Part 2 extends our understanding of these qualitative approaches as participants learn more about the actual practice and conduct of qualitative research. As an engaged community of learners, we will focus on core processes of qualitative design and implementation: writing problem statements, purpose statements, and research questions, sampling strategies, interviewing and participant observation, and data analysis. We will also discuss assessment, validation, and writing reports for diverse audiences. This course will draw upon ex​amples from participants’ own research interests that we will hone through collaborative problem-solving and instructional techniques. Upon completion of this course, participants will gain a deeper under-standing of qualitative research and will have refined and practiced the skills needed to design and conduct their own studies.

Course Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will have the skills to:
  • Identify key traditions and eras in the history of qualitative inquiry;
  • Recognize important ethical issues in research;
  • Distinguish among the epistemological assumptions undergirding qualitative research;
  • Articulate principles and practices of contemporary qualitative research;
  • Design qualitative research studies;
  • Develop qualitative data collection, analysis, and interpretation techniques;
  • Describe how validity, reliability, and generalizability are addressed in qualitative research;
  • Write evaluate, and publish qualitative research studies​
The presenter will lead interactive discussions and facilitate small group exercises and presentations. Workshop participants are expected to actively participate in all course activities and help promote a classroom environment as a community of learners throughout the workshop. Learning from peers will be an important part of this course as we jointly discuss key aspects of qualitative research design and implementation.

The course material includes slides that are available as handouts and on the course web page. Some readings will also be supplied.​
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​Presenter​Prof An Carbonez, KU Leuven, Belgium
​Duration
5 days
​6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​
​Cost​Early Bird Rate: R7 550
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
Format
The class will take place in an e-classroom with computers loaded with the relevant R software and packages. Personal laptops will not be allowed in class, but can be used for homework.
​RequirementsThere are no prerequisites, but previous knowledge about basic mathematical and statistical principles (e.g., vectors, descriptive statistics) is recommended for the introduction in statistical techniques.​
​Target audience
​This course is meant for everyone who is motivated to use the R programming language for their professional/research activities.
​Focus Disciplines
​This course is relevant across all disciplines.

Course Description
This course gives an introduction to the use of the statistical software language R. R is a programming language for data analysis and graphics. In five sessions of four hours, the participants will learn the basics of R. This is a hands-on course with practical assignments.

The course includes:
  • An introduction to the software package R
  • Different data structures in R
  • Importing data in R
  • Writing your own functions
  • Making basic graphics in R; use of GGPLOT2
  • Performing some basic descriptive analysis in R
  • Performing some basic inference tests in R (i.e., testing independence, proportions, t-tests, regression analysis)​
At the end of the course participants should be able to start and perform an analysis by themselves and, in case they need something more complicated or advanced, they will also be able to find out how to go about the next steps.




​Presenters​
​Prof Henry Braun - Boston College, USA
Duration
5 days
​​​6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550 
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
​​​Format
​Mornings: Two interactive sessions with complementary themes​
Afternoons: Delegates will present current work. Dr. Braun will lead discussion of the issues/challenges raised and relationships to course content.​

​​Target audience
The course is designed for practicing statisticians, faculty employing quantitative methods, and advanced graduate students with interests in quantitative methods. Experience in analysing data is an asset. 
Focus Disciplines
Advanced graduate students and statisticians interpreting quantitative data: Delegates' research projects will be discussed in class.


Course Description
Delegates will be presented with statistical principles relevant to data analysis and data modelling, practical guidelines for the interpretation of results, and cautions on common missteps. Principles and guidelines will be illustrated with numerous examples. Discussions of current problems presented by delegates will greatly enrich the experience.

Day 1
Introduction to a data analysis framework and to the concept of the Carrying Capacity of Data.
Examples drawn from fields such as education, demography, engineering

Day 2
Common models and missteps
General linear models
Generalized linear models
Causal inference

Day 3
Classical statistical inference and its discontents
(Fisher vs. Neyman-Pearson-Wald)
The evidential weight of p-values
Introduction (brief) to Bayesian inference

Day 4
Bayes and Empirical Bayes approaches
Model checking

Day 5
International Large-scale Assessment Surveys
Introduction
Analytic Strategies
Uses and misuses

Course Outcomes

  • Delegates will leave with a deeper understanding of how to conduct statistical studies/ program evaluations in order to reach credible, defensible conclusions. 
  • Delegates will have a comprehensive framework for examining data quality and how to employ the results in developing a viable research strategy
  • Delegates will have a greater appreciation of some of the historical antecedents (and practical implications) of today’s debates, common misconceptions and misinterpretations of statistical analyses. They will also be exposed to some alternatives to classical statistical modelling strategies.

Course 7: Design your academic future


​Presenter
Prof Sebastian Kernbach - University of St Gallen, Switzerland​
​Duration
5 days
​6 - 10 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​​​
​​Cost​​
Early Bird Rate: R7 550 + 450 for prescribed Textbook
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500 + 450 for prescribed Textbook​
​​Format

​Participants will be given short input sessions from the instructor and will have time to apply design thinking to their own career and life, giving and getting feedback and improving their professional and private future.
​​Target Audience​
​The course is designed for PhD students and researchers at all levels who wish to design a fulfilling and meaningful future including a career within academia or beyond including overcoming difficulties, reframing dysfunctional beliefs and strengthening career agency and confidence of participants. You do not have to consider yourself​ to be a designer or creative, an open mind for a new model, new methods and a positive mind-set are helpful.
​Textbook
​Ulibarri, N., Cravens, A., Svetina Nabergoj, A., Kernbach, S., & Royalty, A. (2019). Creativity in Research: Cultivate Clarity, Be Innovative, and Make Progress in your Research Journey. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
​About design thinking and life design
​​​Design thinking is a method for problem finding and problem solving, popularized at Stanford University in the early 1990s by applying it to product design. Since that time, a variety of design thinking approaches have been applied to an ever-increasing range of challenges including life challenges.
This course at the ADA is using design thinking for creating a fulfilling and meaningful career and life. It is based on Stanford’s most popular course called “Design Your Life” and adapted to meet the specific needs of academic audiences.
Focus Disciplines 
This course is relevant across all discplines.

Course Description
In this hands-on one-week workshop, participants will have the opportunity to apply design thinking and visual thinking tools and methods to design their own career and life. Together with other PhD students, participants develop a constructive and effective approach to finding and designing their vocation at the University or elsewhere by developing new thinking patterns and working on future ideas. The workshop addresses challenges and questions such as: 
  • What is good work for me?
  • How can I better integrate work into the rest of my life?
  • How can I design a meaningful future despite all my constraints?
  • I want to change something but don’t know where to start.
  • I’m in a hamster wheel and don’t find the time for meaningful things.
  • I have a strong vision but don’t know how to get there.
This workshop uses design thinking to address the “wicked problem” of creating a career and life within and beyond the PhD. It offers a framework, tools, and most importantly a place and a community of peers and mentors where we’ll work on this issue through assigned readings, reflections, and in-class exercises.

We start off with analysing what brought the participants where they are today through activating and reflective visual methods. This understanding will be the foundation for defining the current challenges of participants and ideate possible solutions using visual thinking and incorporating peer coaching. The next stage, prototyping and testing, will support participants in turning their thoughts into action and will aggregate their efforts during the workshop. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to apply their learning and ideas into real life. With this approach, participants can iteratively design their way forward to a more fulfilling and meaningful future.

Further, we will not only apply the model and methods of design thinking but also and especially the mind-set of curiosity, radical collaboration and reframing problems. For the latter, participants will learn how to reframe dysfunctional beliefs about career and life, such as “I have to do it by myself” or “I have to plan it thoroughly before I take action”. It is essentially those dysfunctional beliefs that often prevent us from designing a future that is meaningful for us. Below is a brief overview of the dysfunctional beliefs and how to overcome them.

Design thinking 1.pngBenefits for participants
  • Life design enables participants to strengthen their identity as academics or to build up a vocational identity outside academia
  • By recognizing the wide range of sound career prospects, PhD students experience that asking themselves future career related questions can be fun. Hereby, knowing how to apply life design turns out to be an immense emotional relief 
  • Knowing what you really want in life and how to implement it has positive effects on motivation, job and life satisfaction, as well as wellbeing 
  • Employees who have found their calling have higher job-commitment, work engagement and mental health 
It will take place in an environment that is open, flexible and allows to think beyond the common paths offering literally different perspectives as the environment is changing our behaviour. The entire group, the instructor and the life design teams act as resonating board and will ensure an atmosphere of appreciation, support and encouragement.

Course Outcomes
During this workshop, participants will:
  • understand their needs for a life that offers joy and fulfilment 
  • have already created many job ideas that match their needs
  • have already taken steps to pursue some of their ideas
  • know how to integrate obstacles and constraints into their lives 
  • know what steps to take to realize a flourishing life
  • adopt habits of prototyping and iterating to their vocation and take action instead of over-thinking
  • increase their self-awareness (knowing their intensions and values)
  • increase their self-confidence (knowing their strengths and skills)
  • increase their self-efficacy (dealing with feedback, solving problems creatively, ability and belief to deal with future challenges)
In addition, here are some research results of groups doing “Design Your Life / Design Your Future” workshops:

Design thinking 2.png



​​Course 8: Grounded Theory: Methodology, principles and practices

This course takes place on Saturday 11 January 2020​ 

Presenter​
Prof Wayne A Babchuk - University of Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
​Duration
1 day
11 January 2020​. Saturday 08:30 - 16:30
​Cost
​Rate: R1 600 
​Format
​Participants will focus on the theory and practice of grounded theory through interactive discussions and collaborative feedback using student exemplars to help guide instruction. Participants are encouraged to bring an idea or topic to the workshop they are interested in pursuing in more detail. The presenter will lead interactive discussions and facilitate small group exercises. Participants are to participate in all course activities and discussions and help promote a collaborative learning environment.​
​Target audience
This course will benefit students interested in learning more about grounded theory methodology and those who are using it or intending to use it for their dissertation research or other research projects.The course will accommodate novice and more advanced grounded theorists as we move from theory to practice and incorporate numerous examples across disciplines and topic areas.
​What to bring
​Bring your own laptop and power cord.
Focus Disciplines 
​This course is relevant for all novice grounded theory practitioners.

Course Description
Grounded Theory Methodology Principles and Practices is a one-day course designed to introduce and further participants’ knowledge and application of this popular contemporary research design. Part 1 provides a foundational platform key to improving our understanding of grounded theory methodology theory and application including:
  • The history of grounded theory methodology over time and across disciplines;
  • The ethics of grounded theory research;
  • Core components of grounded theory methodology including constant comparison, theoretical sampling, theoretical saturation, use of literature, etc.;
  • Contemporary approaches to grounded theory methodology including grounded theory ethnography and mixed methods-grounded theory (MM-GT).
Part 2 focuses specifically on the hands-on practical application of grounded theory research and includes:
  • ​​Basics of designing a grounded theory study;​
  • Formulating grounded theory purpose statements and research questions;
  • Collecting data in a grounded theory study;
  • Data analysis in grounded theory;
  • Validity checks in grounded theory;
  • Writing/publishing a grounded theory study;
The course will draw from numerous exemplars of published research articles/texts and actual doctoral dissertation research supervised by the presenter. We will also focus upon the participants’ own research interests to provide collaborative feedback to help fine-tune students’ individual projects. The facilitator will also be available upon completion of the course (late afternoon) and via email to continue to provide feedback on students’ projects for those seeking additional guidance and instruction.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
  • Describe the origins, leading scholars and traditions of grounded theory research;
  • Recognize important ethical issues in grounded theory research;
  • Identify the core components of grounded theory methodology;
  • Identify and distinguish among contemporary approaches to grounded theory including grounded theory ethnography and mixed methods-grounded theory;
  • Design grounded theory research studies;
  • Develop grounded theory data collection, analysis, and interpretation techniques;
  • Describe how validity, reliability, and generalizability are addressed in grounded theory research;
  • Write, evaluate, and publish grounded theory research studies.​

​​Course 9: Confident public speaking

This course takes place on Saturday 11 January 2020

​Presenter
Ms Vicky Davis - Stellenbosch University; TV Presenter & Producer; Programme Director - Cape Town Music Academy NPC
​Duration
​1 day
11 January 2020​. Saturday 08:30 - 16:30
​CostRate: R1 600
Target audience
Postgraduate researchers who are going to present an oral presentation at  a meeting, conference, thesis defence etc. This workshop also forms part of the Science Communication course (14) in week 2 of the Summer School. It is being offered as a stand-alone course due to its popularity.
​Focus Audience 
​This course is relevant across all disciplines.

Course Description
In this course, the participants gain theoretical and practical knowledge of successful public speaking & presenting. The course is specifically targeted at post graduate researchers who have to deliver presentations or talks at conferences, meetings and thesis defences.

Course Outcomes
After completion of the course, the participants will have insight into:
  • How to formulate a successful presentation 
  • The principles of effective public communication
  • How to deal with stress and nerves when speaking in public 
  • The physical aspects of presenting (body language, voice, hands etc)
  • How to make an effective slideshow
  • How to handle question & answer sessions after a presentation

This course takes place on Saturday 11 January 2020

​Presenter
​Prof Catherine Comiske​y - School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin University, Ireland
​Duration
​​1 day
11 January 2020​. Saturday 08:30 - 16:30
​​Cost
​Rate: R1 600
​Requirements
​Participants should have an experimental or intervention study planned and should bring with them a copy of their proposed ethics application form. The course will be interdisciplinary and will focus on practical examples and workshops where students can develop their own project work with hands on input from the facilitator.
​Target audience
​This course will benefit those who wish to undertake research within a range of real world settings and contexts, who wish to apply for ethical approval, ensure the quality of their data and understand the importance of research integrity in publication of findings.
​Focus Disciplines

​Any delegates that need to obtain ethical clearance.
Health Care Professionals of SA (HCPSA) will be certified with 6 Ethics CPD points.

Course Description
The following topics will be covered
  • Review of  the origins of ethics
  • Ethical principles and responsibilities
  • Data Protection Acts
  • Levels of anonymity and confidentiality
  • Data storage, accessing and processing
  • Quality assurance
  • Types of consent
  • Access to participants and gate keeping
  • Service user engagement
  • Working with vulnerable populations
  • Working with children
  • Working in a range of settings
  • Completing an ethics application form
  • Planning ethical dissemination, feedback and implementation of results in publications, policy and practice.

Course Outcomes 
At the end of the course participants will be able to:
  • Describe  the ethical principles and their origins
  • Have an awareness of the relevant data protection, data storage and sharing regulations
  • Be aware of how to obtain consent and work with gate keepers
  • Know how to work ethically with people who use services, vulnerable populations and children within a range of settings
  • Complete an ethics application form
  • ​Plan appropriate dissemination and feedback to research participants.​

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Course 11: Fundamentals of publishing

​This course takes place on Saturday 11 January 2020

​Presenter
​Prof Leslie Swartz - Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University
​Duration
​​​1 day
11 January 2020​. Saturday 08:30 - 16:30
​​Cost
​Rate: R1 600
​Requirements
​This course is open to all who are committed to publishing in their chosen academic fields.
​Target audience
​This course will benefit those who wish to learn the fundamentals of academic publishing and will also be of use to authors wishing to increase the number and quality of their publication outputs.
​Focus Discipline 
​​This course is relevant across all disciplines.

Course Description
This is an interactive course and will be driven in large part by participant skills and interests.  The following topics will be covered
  • Publishing principles
  • Choosing journals
  • Academic writing style
  • Dealing with and responding to reviews and reviewers​

Course Outcomes 
At the end of the course participants will be able to:
  • Identify the process of peer review and academic publishing
  • Make informed choices about article format and journal conventions
  • Read reviewer feedback and manage the revision and resubmission process​​

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Course 12​: Grant writing fundamentals

This course takes place on Saturday 11 January 2020​

​Presenter
Ms Riana Coetsee - Division for Research Development, Stellenbosch University
​Duration
​​​1 day
11 January 2020​. Saturday 08:30 - 16:30
​Cost​Rate: R1 600
​Requirements
Participants should be busy with research, be it at postgraduate or postdoctoral level or in full-time academic staff capacity.
​Target audience
Researchers (including postgraduate students and postdocs) who need to generate research funds.
​​​What to bring
Please come with an idea for a case study research project or a case study that is underway.
It may help to bring a laptop computer with power cord.
​Focus Disciplines
​​This course is relevant across all disciplines


Course Description

Although funding organisations and their application requirements differ, there are important elements expected from all funding agencies, whether it relates to small or to large grants.  The following elements will be thus be discussed and practised in the workshop:

  • Basic structure of grant proposal
  • Why grant proposals fail
  • The core components of a grant proposal
  • Why writing style matters
  • The budget
  • Where to look for funding
  • Explaining peer review panels  

Course Outcomes
Participants will understand the following:
  • What basic and core components an application should have to make it competitive
  • What pitfalls should be avoided when writing grant proposals
  • What elements should be included in the budget
  • Where to start looking for funding​

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Course 13: MAXQDA Software for Qualitative and Mixed Methods analysis

This course takes place on Saturday 11 January 2020​

Presenter​​Pr​of Timothy C. Guetterman - Creighton University, Omaha, USA
Registered MAXQDA trainer
​Duration
​​​1 day
11 January 2020​. Saturday 08:30 - 16:30​
​Cost
Rate: R1 600. A 3 month software license is included in the workshop price​​.
​Focus Disciplines 
​​The programme is optimised for analysis of qualitative and mixed methods data.


Course Description

This one-day workshop will provide a hands-on experience to learn the fundamentals of MAXQDA, a qualitative and mixed methods analysis software program. In the first session, we will introduce the ways that qualitative software can be used and provide a detailed introduction to MAXQDA features. Participants will have time to practice using the software as features are demonstrated. Major topics will include: understanding the user interface, importing data, viewing and editing data, coding and managing codes, retrieving coded segments, working with memos, searching the database, and exporting coded segments and reports. In the second session, we will have more hands-on work and continue with advanced features of MAXQDA. We will also cover mixed methods features, such as adding quantitative variables and data and conducting a mixed methods analysis.

We require​ participants to bring their laptops in order to practice using MAXQDA. Participants can use a sample dataset or bring their own data. We will send instructors for installation including a free, 3-month educational license prior to the workshop.

Course Outcomes

During this workshop, participants will gain:

  • Understanding of the features of MAXQDA
  • Skills to code qualitative data using MAXQDA
  • Skills to develop sophisticated queries to examine patterns and themes in the data
  • Understanding of the mixed methods features of MAXQDA

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Course 14: Scientific communication: How to write an article, present a poster, design slides & give an oral presentation

​Presenter

​Prof John Creemers - KU Leuven, Belgium
Ms Vicky Davis - M.Dram, Stellenbosch University; TV Presenter & Producer; Programme Director - Cape Town Music Academy NPC
​Duration
​5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​​​
​Cost

​Early Bird Rate: R7 550
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
​​Format
Lectures, exercises and practical group sessions.
​Requirements
The participants need to be able to read and understand a scientific publication in their field.
​Target audience
PhD researchers who are going to present a poster or give an oral presentation at a scientific meeting, or need to write an IMRAD-structured (Introduction, Materials & Methods, Results And Discussion) manuscript for publication.​
What to bring 
​ Your own slideshow and either your own manuscript or a research (NOT review) manuscript from your field.​
​Focus Audience 
​This course is relevant across all disciplines, although presenter has a health sciences background.


Course Description
This course will explain the principles of effective communication, how to make and present a poster at a scientific meeting, how to analyse and write an IMRAD-structured scientific article, and how to give an oral presentation with slideshow. Finally, we will discuss how to answer questions and how to deal with nerves.

Course Outcomes

After completion of the course, the participants will have insight into:

  • The principles of effective communication
  • How to have an impact with a poster
  • The principle of an elevator pitch
  • The peer-review process in publishing
  • The composition of an IMRAD-based manuscript
  • How to write an IMRAD-based manuscript
  • How to make an effective slideshow
  • How to give an oral presentation with slideshow
  • How to answer questions after a presentation

Course material
The course material are slides, which will be made available as handouts. For homework assignments, we will select manuscripts in the field othe participants.
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Course 15: The Productive PhD: Creating structure, gaining clarity & overcoming blocks

​Presenter
Prof Sebastian Kernbach - St Gallen University, Switzerland
​Duration
​5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​​​
​​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 500
Format
​​Participants will be given short input sessions from the instructor and will have time to apply design thinking to their own project(s), giving and getting feedback and improving their research project.

​Target Audience​
​The course is designed for PhD students and researcher at all levels who wish to be more productive, making progress through visual thinking and finding ways to get unstuck. You do not have to consider yourself to be good at drawing or creative, an open mind for new methods and tools is helpful.
Focus Disciplines 
This course is relevant across all disciplines.


Course Description

In this hands-on one-week workshop, participants will have the opportunity to apply visual thinking and design thinking tools and methods to their own research projects. They will apply simple and easy to learn visual tools to structure their ideas, literature, academic discourses, and potential contributions, among others. Through the process of prototyping and iterating they will gain clarity in their PhDs and for their future research careers. In addition, interventions from the field of positive psychology and positive leadership will help participants to overcome blocks and flourish in their PhD.

Based on the design thinking framework and mind-set established at the design school at Stanford University, participants will gain creative confidence in their research process and when facing challenges, get problem-solving abilities to better deal with ambiguity using analytical skills and creative intelligence and improve their emotional well-being by being proactive about their emotional needs which ultimately leads to improved productivity.

The goal of this workshop is to recognize the creative, playful mind-set that underlies successful innovation in scholarship and explore how design thinking can improve the research process to make us more innovative scholars or scientists. And with this, to increase the ability of researchers to create quality research and a systematic application of creativity in their own research development. Especially because emerging scholars and interdisciplinary researchers need tools, techniques, support, and inspiration to approach their research in an innovative and playful spirit of design.

Participants will explore a variety of design skills and mind-sets, but focus especially on how being mindful of your own research process, work styles, emotional state, and sometimes-hidden assumptions can help you get “unstuck" when facing research bumps in the road. The instructor seeks to help participants to explore potential solutions to problems in their research efforts.

Participants will present their prototypes and iterative developments from throughout the week and will present their research story in new presentation and storytelling formats such as Visual Storytelling. The Visual Storytelling Canvas will help participants to shape a story of the current research. The workshop is characterized by a positive, intimate and encouraging atmosphere in which exchanging successful practices and failures (also known as “learning opportunities") is central to the learning success of all participants. Therefore, the number of participants is kept small to enable meaningful exchanges.​


Course Outcomes

During this workshop, participants will gain:

Creative confidence

  • with tools, techniques and inspiration for an innovative mind-set
  • to improve their research process
  • to make themselves more innovative scholars
  • to become “unstuck" in times of research blocks

Problem-solving abilities

  • reflecting, iterating and tolerating ambiguity
  • refining questions, processes, and methods, viewing setbacks as opportunities for further learning
  • highlighting the creative process of scholarly research
  • combining analytical skills and creative intelligence

Emotional well-being

  • being proactive about emotional needs (as it leads to greater productivity)
  • creating a social-support network (academic, non-academic)
  • creative a supportive, non-judgmental environment
  • work in tandems and experience peer-coaching​

Course 16: Advanced Qualitative research design and methodology​​

Presenter​
​Prof Wayne A Babchuk - University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA
​Duration
5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​​​
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550 
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R8 500
Format​Participants should bring to the class their qualitative research projects they are currently working on or are interested in working on in the near future. The course will employ interactive and systematic feedback from the instructor AND course participants as we discuss each student’s research project and their research interests from design to implementation to publication of their work.
​​Target audience
​Delegates are expected to have a basic understanding of qualitative research so that the primary focus of the course is to help participants make informed and strategic decisions regarding the conduct of their qualitative or mixed methods dissertation research (or other research projects). Delegates are expected to have had some form of prior instruction in qualitative research methodology either through ADA or from their previous training at their host institutions.
Focus disciplines 
Delegates using Qualitative research design and methodology, for example Social and Health Sciences, and Education.

Course Description
Advanced Qualitative Research Design and Implementation is an interdisciplinary advanced course structured to benefit students seeking to improve their qualitative skills and hone their abilities to conduct research at the highest level.  Part 1 provides a concise overview of foundational knowledge underpinning the qualitative enterprise including:
  • The history, ethics, and epistemological foundations of qualitative research;
  • Key characteristics of qualitative methods;
  • Differences between qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research;
  • Underlying assumptions, procedures, challenges, and applications of several popular contemporary qualitative approaches.

Part 2 focuses on the systematic conduct of qualitative research including:

  • Formulating qualitative purpose statements and research questions;
  • Use of literature and sampling strategies in qualitative research;
  • Data collection and analysis techniques;
  • Validation strategies needed to achieve rigor and trustworthiness and evaluate and assess qualitative research studies.

Part 3 constitutes the heart of this course and focuses on:

  • Advancing student research projects through instructor and participants' collaborative feedback on students' designs;
  • Development of expertise in the approach/sub-approach employed by course participants in their individual research projects;
  • Turning doctoral research into professional presentations and publishable articles;
  • Presenting individuals' well-crafted designs to the class.
Course Outcomes 
Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to:
  • Identify important traditions, themes, scholars, and publications that define the history and application of qualitative research;
  • Articulate ethical practices needed to successfully conduct research;
  • Describe philosophical assumptions, paradigms, and theoretical orientations underlying qualitative research;
  • Identify characteristics of qualitative research and key differences between qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches;
  • Describe types, procedures, challenges, and applications of contemporary approaches/sub-approaches to qualitative inquiry;
  • Develop clearly stated purpose statements and research questions;
  • Determine effective strategies for sampling in qualitative research (sites and participants);
  • Employ validation strategies as appropriate (rigor and trustworthiness);
  • Design effective data collection, analysis, interpretation, and representation strategies;
  • Demonstrate expertise in one or more of the major approaches and sub-approaches to qualitative inquiry;
  • Design and conduct a rigorous qualitative study that provides a solid foundation for doctoral dissertations and subsequent professional presentations/publications in students' fields;
  • Present the design, implementation, and findings (if applicable) of individual research projects to the class.​
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Course 17: Teaching in the digital world: The use of blended active learning strategies​​​​

​Presenters

Prof Wim van Petegem - KU Leuven, Belgium
​Dr JP Bosman - Director: Centre for Learning Technologies, Stellenbosch University
Dr Sonja Strydom, Dr Nompilo Tshuma, Ms Mine de Klerk, Centre for Learning Technologies, Stellenbosch University.
​Duration
​5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​​​
​​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550  
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
​Format
​The course format includes face-to-face and virtual (online) presentations, hands-on practical activities, group discussions, and an individual project such as designing a digital active learning intervention.  
​Requirement
​Participants should have a genuine interest in digital technologies and their application in teaching and learning. Some basic experience with the use of learning technologies in general might be helpful in the practical sessions.
​Target Audience
​The course is designed for the teacher of the future, from new lecturers to more senior academics from all disciplines, with a keen interest in teaching and learning at the one hand, and digital technologies at the other hand.
 Participants should want to learn to
  • Further develop their skills on how to teach in the modern (digital) age;
  • How to activate learners both in a face-to-face and an online learning environment;
  • How to blend these different worlds into one new integrated learning experience;
  • How to cope with fast moving new trends in digital learning technologies;
  • How to apply these insights into their own practice as a teacher (and a learner), etc.
​What to bring
It is required for the participants to bring their own devices (laptop, smartphone) to make use of them during the course.​
​Focus Disciplines
This course is relevant across all disciplines.

Course Description

The course will concentrate around the following themes:

  • Understanding the basics of active learning as a foundation for good academic teaching,
  • Using digital tools for classroom-based active learning,
  • Going fully online as teacher and learner,
  • Blending classroom and online learning experiences into a meaningful integrated learning experience,
  • Reflecting through action research on your own practice as a teacher in the digital world. 

The course will include presentations of theoretical evidence-based concepts, models and frameworks, good practices, inspiring examples, practical illustrations, and interesting (open) resources, combined with hands-on exercises. Together with the instructors, course participants will work together and reflect on how to change their own practice as a teacher in the digital world.

​Furthermore, guest lectures by local experts will be provided on certain aspects of the course, either face-to-face or online.


Course Outcomes
After completion of the course, the participants will be able to:
  • Describe the fundamentals of active- and blended learning and apply them into a classroom, a fully online and a blended learning environment;
  • Search, assess and use up-to-date learning technologies in order to improve their own teaching;
  • Design, develop and implement meaningful learning experiences in order to activate learners;
  • Apply action research for reflection on their own practice as a teacher in the digital world.​​
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​Presenter
Dr Cindy-Lee Steenekamp - Stellenbosch University
​Duration
5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​​​
​​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
​Requirement
Delegates must be computer literate and competent to register for this course.
Software

​The SPSS classroom is equipped with computers which provide delegates with the latest version of SPSS. A license for the SPSS package for private use is not included in the price of the workshop and must either be purchased or provided by delegates or their institution if they wish to make use of the software. Please note that we cannot accommodate private laptops in the class.
​Target Audience
​Postgraduate students, supervisors and researchers interested in acquiring quantitative research skills and techniques. This course is especially useful for participants who make use of surveys or want to conduct secondary data analysis based on survey research.​
​Focus Disciplines
​SPSS is aimed at practitioners in the Social Sciences, but can be relevant to anyone that is using survey research or quantitative data analysis.

Course Description

During this course, participants will be introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) – one of the most widely used social statistical packages in the world. It needs to be emphasized that this is an introductory course, ideally suited for first time users or participants with limited experience with the software program. Participants should be computer literate and competent as this is a computer-based course with an emphasis on skills transfer.

​This short course focuses specifically on the knowledge and skills required for quantitative data analysis. The broad objectives of this course are to provide participants with an understanding of the logic of quantitative data analysis and to give participants the opportunity to develop the practical computer skills required for data analysis.


Course Outcomes
When delegates have completed this course they should:

  • Be familiar with the layout and basic functioning of SPSS
  • Be able to create and maintain a database
  • Be able to do a summary analysis of a data set - produce frequencies, descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and comparison of means
  • Be able to manipulate data - recode, ​treat missing values and construct a variable
  • Be able to graphically illustrate data using a variety of chart options
  • Be able to interpret and present the ensuing results
  • The following aspects are covered:
    • Levels of measurement, creating and editing a data file, transporting a file from Excel
    • Univariate analyses: Frequencies and summary statistics
    • ​Bivariate analyses: Cross-tabulations and comparison of means
    • Inspecting variables: Recoding variables, computing variables, selecting cases and splitting files

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​Presenter
Pr​of Timothy C. Guetterman - Creighton University, Omaha, USA
​Duration
​5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​
​​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is critical to come with an idea for a research project and topic. We will refine and work on it throughout the course.
Target Audience​
​This course will benefit delegates who want to learn more about quantitative research design and methods. It is idea for students who are at the early phases of their PhD, who can actively develop their proposal through the course. Delegates planning a quantitative research study will benefit. The course is highly interdisciplinary, as is the instructor, and will use examples from the educational, social, and health sciences conducted across locations.
​What to bring
​Please bring an idea for a mixed methods project or a mixed methods project underway.
​Focus disciplines
​​Any discipline using a mixed methods approach in their research.

Course Description
This introductory course will teach participants when, how and why to integrate a qualitative and a quantitative research components into a single research project.
 Mixed methods research is an innovative and increasingly important way to conduct research in the social sciences. This research design integrates qualitative and quantitative components in a research study or very closely connected series of studies that inform one another. As a research approach, major value-added of mixed methods is to yield something more than the “sum” of the qualitative and quantitative parts through meaningful integration. The course places special emphasis the markers of scientifically rigorous mixed methods research to achieve integration. 

Course Outcomes
This workshop will be practical and hands on. We step through the features of rigorous mixed methods research that you can immediately apply to your research proposal, project, or manuscripts underway. 

At the end of this workshop, delegates will

  • understand the principles of mixed methods research
  • be able to apply components of rigorous mixed methods studies,
  • identify the possibilities and limitations of mixed methods research
  • outline the basics of a mixed methods design with a design diagram appropriate for any specific purpose
  • have a concrete plan for integration of qualitative and quantitative research
  • draft a potential joint display to represent integration. ​
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​Presenter

Dr Ruth Albertyn - Centre for Higher and Adult Education, Stellenbosch University
Dr Christel Troskie-De Bruin - Centre for Higher and Adult Education, Stellenbosch University
​Duration
​5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​
​​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R8 000 
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 750​
Requirements
Participants must have the following in place before the course commences:
  • ​The first rough draft of an article based on completed research (for example completed data analysis or completed section of the literature review)
  • Identified a journal where you would like to submit an article
  • The guidelines for authors of this journal
  • A laptop to use during the workshop (not only a tablet or iPad)
  • ​Power cables and adaptor for laptop
Target Audience
This course is aimed at doctoral candidates who have already begun their doctoral research project and are at a stage where they have completed some sections of their research and have publishable material from any part of their study. It is essential that the data has already been analysed or the literature already collected as there is not sufficient time for these tasks during the workshop.  The focus of this workshop is on actual writing of the article and there is thus minimal formal lecturing during the workshop. 
​Focus disciplines 
​​This course is relevant across all disciplines.


Course Description
During this hands-on course, participants plan and write an article for publication in a scholarly journal. Participants work on material from their doctoral studies and it is essential for this workshop to have a draft manuscript to work on during your time with the ADA. Minimal input is provided by the facilitator and participants then spend workshop time crafting their article with one-on-one discussion and feedback from facilitators during the writing process.

Course Outcomes

After completion of the course, the participant will have a completed article which can be submitted for consideration by the intended journal. Throughout the week:

  • Input is provided on each section of the article
  • Participants write the relevant section
  • Facilitator reads work and provides feedback
  • Participants redraft before writing the next section of the article​
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​Presenter
Dr Lauren Wildschut​ - CREST, Stellenbosch University
​Duration
​​5 days
13 - 17 January 2020. Monday to Thursday 08:30 - 16:30 & Friday 08:30 - 13:00​
​​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R7 550
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close
Standard Rate: R8 500
​Requirements
​Delegates must be competent computer users to register for this course.
​Software

​This course will feature version 8 of ATLAS.ti and will focus on the Windows version (there is a Mac version as well). The classes are presented in a fully equipped computer laboratory (classroom) and personal laptops cannot be accommodated. Please note that the course fee does not include the software. However, if you are a student, you can purchase the software at a discounted price via the ATLAS.ti website.
​Target Audience
​ATLAS.ti is a software programme that supports the process of analysing qualitative data.
This course will be valuable for all those who want to learn about a software programme that can support them during their literature review and for those who plan to work with qualitative data like interview or focus group transcripts, field notes, geo data, reports, images or videos.
This course will feature version 8 of ATLAS.ti, which is now able to import data from reference manages like Mendeley, Evernotes and Twitter. Thus, those already familiar with an older version of ATLAS.ti might also find this course valuable.
Focus disciplines 
​​Delegates that use qualitative data, or would like to use ATLAS.ti during their literature review or similar. 

Course Description

This is an introductory course dealing with qualitative data analysis (QDA) using a software programme called ATLAS.ti. Participants will learn the technical side of handling and working with qualitative data in ATLAS.ti. Participating in the course will enable you to begin to work with the software and to utilise it for your own research project.

Specific course element​s are as follows:

  • Coding of various formats of data
  • Coding of open-ended questions in survey data
  • Basic analysis of qualitative data
  • Using ATLAS.ti for your literature review
  • Presenting qualitative data

​Course Outcomes

You will learn to carry out your literature review in a more rigorous manner and to analyse qualitative data more effectively.​

Introduction to qualitative data analysis
  • Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) Interface
Finding your way around
  • Getting to know the ATLAS.ti User Interface
  • Project Management
How to set up a project / Working with various data types
Coding:
  • Technical aspects of coding
  • Methodological aspects of coding: how to build an efficient coding schema
Use case:
  • Using ATLAS.ti for your literature review
  • Analysing twitter data
  • While we are going through the use cases, you will be introduced to various other functions like writing comments and memos, simple analytic tools and the network view function.
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