African Doctoral Academy
Welcome to Stellenbosch University

Workshop information

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​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Please click on the course you would like to read more about.​​​​

ADA Hybrid Winter School 2022

29 June - 15 July 2022 

Full programme dates, costs and further information are listed here

​The Registration form is listed here.​


​​​​​​​​Course 1: Fundamentals of research design and methods

Course 2: Research publication and presentation: Principles and practices​​

Course 3: Project management principles: ​Planning and execution for your PhD​

Course 4: ​Grounded theory: Methodology, principles and practices  

Course 5: ​​A quick start to data visualisation with Tableau Public *new​

Course 6: ​How to build a successful relationship with your Supervisor *new

Course 7Preparing for the PhD​​​​​​​

Course 8: ​​Teaching in the digital world: The use of blended active learning strategies

Course 9: ​Introduction to quantitative research design and methodology​​​​​​​​

Course 10: ​​Introduction to SPSS ​ 

Course 11: ​Advanced qualitative research design and methodology​​​​​​​​​

Course 12Supervising the PhD by publication ​ 

Course 13: ​Writing and publishing an article from the PhD

Course 14: ​​How to argue and write an effective proposal ​​for your Masters or Doctorate *new​​​​​​​​​


Course 1: Fundamentals of research design methods

​Presenter Prof Tim Guetterman (University of Michigan, USA & Stellenbosch University)​
​Duration
1 day orientation +  3 days course work
Orientation takes place on 28 June 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place over the period 29 June - 1 July 2022 on MS Teams
Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:30 - 17:00 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks). They will submit a work sheet/assignment at the end of day 1 and 2, that will be marked by Prof Guetterman. 
​Cost
Early Bird: R4100 |​ Standard: R4700​​
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close​​
​​Requirements
​​Delegates are expected to log in on the system before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand and a compulsory orientation will take place on 28 June, while the hands-on instruction will take place from 29 June - 1 July 2022.
​Target audience
This course will help delegates who are developing a research proposal. It aims to provide a useful preparation for either of the week long Introduction to Quantitative or Introduction to Qualitative Research courses. It is also designed to benefit delegates who are embarking on independent research for the first time or delegates who need a refresher before starting their PhDs. For example, if you have taken time after your Master’s, are changing directions, or simply need a refresher, this course provides an accessible introduction to research fundamentals. In particular, it will be helpful to delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently, who are in the early phase of their PhD, or preparing for a research degree or project.

Course Description

This course offers a preparation on the fundamentals of research from a research methods and research design orientation, and will provide an overview of research in general along with a brief overview of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research. The goal is to exit with an understanding of the basic elements of research and to be able to apply concepts to develop a research plan. The course will also prepare you for future courses, such as the Introduction to Qualitative Research or Introduction to Quantitative Research.
 
Our major topics include:

  • Defining research
  • Understanding the importance of research
  • Identifying a research problem to study of appropriate scope
  • Reviewing the literature
  • Specifying an objective, purpose, research questions, or hypotheses
  • Collecting quantitative data
  • Analyzing and interpreting quantitative data
  • Collecting qualitative data
  • Analyzing and interpreting qualitative data
  • Selecting a research design
    • 3 Major quantitative designs
    • 3 Major qualitative designs
    • Mixed methods designs
  • Writing and Evaluating Research

Course outcomes
At the end of the course, participants should be able to:
  • Describe and apply fundamentals of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research to a plan or proposal
  • Identify a research problem to study of appropriate scope
  • Write an objective, purpose statement, aim, or research question as appropriate to your discipline.
  • Develop a plan for data collection and analysis
  • Defend their choice of methods and research design
  • Apply criteria to evaluate research 
Course material
The course materials will be made available online on the day, but delegates will be required to log in before the course starts and complete the course orientation ​

Course format
​The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.
  • This course will be taught online on MS Teams, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and  "virtual office hour” consultations.
  • Delegates will be required to deliver a presentation during the workshop with slides (PowerPoint or other).
  • Prof Guetterman will give feedback on questions and submissions. 
  • ​You should allocate about 6 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer


Course 2: Research publication and ​prese​ntation: Principles and practices​

​​Presenters​
​Prof Leslie Swartz (Stellenbosch University)
Duration
1 day orientation + 3 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 28 June 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place over the period 29 June - 1​​ July 2022 on MS Teams
Participants must be available on all three days between 9:00 and 15:00.  The exact structure of the course will be affected by class participation and interests, but not all the time will be spent in face to face teaching – there will also be assignments for participants to complete on their own.
​Cost
Early Bird: R4100* |​ Standard: R4700​​*
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close
​Requirements
Participants should be interested in ways to build their skills in academic publication – and have an idea of what they consider to be aspirational publication goals. No experience with academic publication is required.
​​Target audience
This course focusses on the process of publishing in accredited academic journals.  The primary audience is new academics who have not published in journals, or who have published very little and wish to increase their number of research outputs. 
​​What to bring?
Those delegates who sign up for the course will be sent a detailed questionnaire before the course starts.  Any examples of your previous attempts at journal article writing and responses from reviewers will be helpful.​


Course Description
How can you present and publish your research so that it is useful and valuable to others? In this course, we will tackle this question head-on, delivering principles and practical steps for publication in academic journals.  Among other topics, we will discuss the key aspects that go into publishing research, how to deal with common challenges in publishing, and ways to frame your research for key journal audiences.  Please note that this is not a course in how to write sentences and paragraphs; though we will touch on issues of writing style, the emphasis is on publication strategies and habits.

Course Outcomes
At the end of the course, the delegates will be able to:
  • Be familiar with conventions of academic publishing
  • Be aware of the implications of different audiences and conventions of academic writing
  • Understand the common challenges of writing academic publications and tips for overcoming them.
  • Identify key aspects of an academic publication in your discipline
  • Understand how to resonate and transfer findings from a specific project to a variety of settings
Course material

Slides for the course will be made available to participants after presentations have been made; during the course I will point you to various resources.


Course format
  • The course will include asynchronous activities and homework.
  • Course activities will include a mix of synchronous lectures and short assignments to be handed in.
  • Exact times for activities will be determined partly by class participation and are subject to change, but delegates should anticipate that we will start each morning with a live lecture (09:00 to 10.30), then the rest of the time before lunch for your working on assignments, with a similar pattern in the afternoon: live lecture time from 13:30 to 15:00 and then assignment time).  Please note ALL TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

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Course 3: Project management principles: ​Planning an​d execution for your PhD​


​​Presenters​
 Dr Joubert van Eeden (Stellenbosch University)
Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day​ course work
Orientation will take place on 29 June 2022. (45 minutes)
Course takes place on Friday, 1 July 2022 on MS Teams at 09:00 to 17:00.

​Cost
Rate: R1500
​Requirements
Delegates are expected to log in on the system before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand and a compulsory orientation will take place on 29 June, while the hands-on instruction will take place on 1 July 2022.
​​Target audience
Researchers who are preparing for, or have recently started with an individual research project (PhD, Masters, or other).


Course Description
The course will provide participants insight into the following aspects of project management: project management theory; scope management; stakeholder engagement; quality management; time management; risk management; project control and progress monitoring. 
The course has a specific focus on individual research projects for participants that are involved in research towards a degree.

​​Course Outcomes

After completion of the course, the participants will be able to:

  • Understand how the basic principles of project management relates to individual research projects
  • Argue the importance of time management within research project delivery and describe the cost and quality interdependency
  • Plan a research project at a high level and provide a clear scope statement and project plan
  • Be able to apply the basic risk management process to rank and mitigate risk on research projects
  • Can compile a (brief) report on project progress against defined key milestones


Course material

The course materials will be made available online on the day, but delegates will be required to log in before the course starts and complete the course orientation.


Course format

The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.

  • This course will be taught online using a blend of lecturing, group format discussions, and time to work on own research project definitions with inputs from the lecturer and peers.
  • The course will start with online lectures and alternate with theory related break-away group assignment discussions.
  • The presenter will give feedback on questions and group feedback during the online sessions. 


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Course 4: Grounded theory: Methodology, ​​principles and practices

​​Presenters​
​Prof Wayne A Babchuk (University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA) & Ms Deborah Skinstad (Stellenbosch University)​
Duration
1 day orientation + 2 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 29 June 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place over the period 1 - 2 July 2022 on MS Teams. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:30 - 17:00 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks). Delegates will submit a work sheet/assignment at the end of each day that will be marked.
​Cost
​R2700
​Requirements
Some familiarity with qualitative research in general terms. 
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand with a compulsory orientation taking place on 29 June 2022​, while the hands-on instruction will take place from 1 - 2 July 2022.
​​Target audience
​This course will benefit students interested in learning more about grounded theory methodology and those who either are using it or intending to use it for their dissertation research or other research projects. The course will accommodate novice and more advanced grounded theorists as we move from theory to practice and incorporate numerous examples across disciplines and topic areas.
What to bring?
Participants are encouraged to bring an idea or topic to the workshop they are interested in pursuing in more detail. 


Course Description
Grounded Theory: Methodology Principles and Practices is a one-day course designed to introduce and further participants’ knowledge and application of this popular contemporary research design. 
Part 1 provides a foundational platform key to improving our understanding of grounded theory methodology theory and application including:
  • ​The history of grounded theory methodology over time and across disciplines; 
  • The ethics of grounded theory research; 
  • Core components of grounded theory methodology including constant comparison, theoretical sampling, theoretical saturation, use of literature, etc.; 
  • Contemporary approaches to grounded theory methodology including grounded theory ethnography and mixed methods-grounded theory (MM-GT).
Part 2 focuses specifically on the hands-on practical application of grounded theory research and includes:
  • Basics of designing a grounded theory study; 
  • Formulating grounded theory purpose statements and research questions;
  • Collecting data in a grounded theory study; 
  • Data analysis in grounded theory; 
  • Validity checks in grounded theory; 
  • Writing/publishing a grounded theory study;​
The course will draw from numerous exemplars of published research articles/texts and actual doctoral dissertation research supervised by the presenter. We will also focus upon the participants’ own research interests to provide collaborative feedback to help fine-tune students’ individual projects. The facilitator will also be available upon completion of the course (late afternoon) and via email to continue to provide feedback to students. 

Course Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
  • Describe the origins, leading scholars and traditions of grounded theory research; 
  • Identify the core components of grounded theory methodology;
  • Recognize important ethical issues in grounded theory research; 
  • Identify and distinguish among contemporary approaches to grounded theory including grounded theory ethnography and mixed methods-grounded theory; 
  • Design grounded theory research studies; 
  • Develop grounded theory data collection, analysis, and in-terpretation techniques; 
  • Describe how validity, reliability, and generalizability are addressed in grounded theory research; 
  • Write, evaluate, and publish grounded theory research studies.​​

Course material

The course material are slides available as handouts and on the course web page. Some readings are also provided.

Course format
Blend of online teaching and self-paced learning and practical assignments.
Participants will focus on the theory and practice of grounded theory through interactive discussions and collaborative feedback using student examplars to help guide instruction. Participants are encouraged to bring an idea or topic to the workshop they are interested in pursuing in more detail. 


Course 5​: A quick start to data visualisation with Tableau Public *new​​

Presenter Ms Marie Roux​​ (Stellenbosch University)
​​Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day course work
Orientation will take place on 30 June 2022 (45 minutes)​
Course takes place on 2 July, 2022 on MS Teams. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:00 - 16:30 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks). 
​Cost 
​R1350​​
​Requirements
Delegates are expected to download the Tableau software before the time. Instructions will be distributed a few days in advance. Hands-on online instruction will take place on 2 July.​

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand with a compulsory orientation on 30 June 2022, while the hands-on instruction will take place on the 2nd of July, 2022​.​
​Target audience
The course will focus on how to create interesting visualisations and stories with your data. It will benefit those who have to use visualisations in their proposals, dissertations or reports and need to create something more than ordinary graphs.
​What to bring?
Laptop with Tableau Software downloaded. No support for the download will be possible. Contact Tableau’s help desk if you experience any problems.

Course​ description
The following topics will be addressed:
  • The layout of Tableau Desktop
  • Tableau output types: worksheets, dashboards, stories
  • Basic functions of the worksheets
  • Basic functions of dashboards
  • Basic functions of stories in Tableau Public
  • How to connect your Excel file
  • The different chart types
  • Tableau Public Online
  • 1 exercise will need to be completed at the end of the day

Course outcomes
After completion of the course, the delegates will have insight into:
  • Create a few types of charts in Tableau Desktop
  • Being able to execute all the basic functions in the worksheet view
  • Being able to execute the basic functions in the dashboard view
  • Being able to execute the basic functions in the stories view
  • Publish your visualisation to the online platform, and download, and/or embed your work.

Course material

The course materials will be made available online on the day. 


Course fo​rmat
  • This course will be offered as a fully online, interactive course in the form of webinar lectures and live online classes with discussion and presenter feedback.

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​​Presenters​
​Dr Kerstin Lange (Hamburg University)​
Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day​ course work
Orientation will take place on 30 June 2022 (45 minutes)
Course take place on 2 July 2022 on MS Teams. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:00 - 16:3​​0 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks).​
​Cost
​R1350​​
​Requirements
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand with a compulsory orientation on 30 June 2022, while the hands-on instruction will take place on 2 July 2022.
​​Target audience
Early doctoral researchers, master students.


Course Description
A good supervisory relationship is an essential element for a successful doctorate. It is not only one of the key components to master your research project, bu it also affects your wellbeing during the doctoral phase and has an impact on further career development in academia. To bu​ild up a constructive and professional relationship right from the beginning, it is helpful to define mutual responsibilities and expectations clearly and to communicate these openly.

Course Outcomes

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • be aware of personal responsibility and self-reliance
  • to engage actively in shaping the relationship with their supervisor(s)
  • transfer communication tools and methods into practice


Course material
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course on the day, but delegates will be required to log in before the course starts and complete the course orientation.

Course format
The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles. 
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • The presenter will give feedback on questions and submissions.
  • ​You should allocate about 6 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer

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​ 

Course 7: Preparing for t​he PhD​​​​​

Presenters​
Dr Layla Cassim (ERS Consultants) & Dr Nicoline Herman (Stellenbosch University))
​Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day​ course work
Orientation will take place on 1 July 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place from the 4 to 8 July  2022, 08:30 to 16:30.
​Cost
Rate: Early Bird: ​R6200 |​ Standard: R6700 *+ ​R450 Toolkit​
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close​
​​
​​Format
During the two book-end sessions of the workshop (Monday and Friday), Dr Herman will cover the Introduction to Doctoral Studies (Monday) and Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Friday). Dr Herman will use a blend of online (synchronous) teaching, self-study (asynchronous) and individual and group activities (synchronous and ).
  • ​At the beginning of day 1, everyone will introduce themselves. ​The rest of the morning will be an interesting mix of synchronous sessions as well as asynchronous activities completed individually and in smaller groups. After lunch we will start with a synchronous session before you embark on self-study and reflection for the rest of the afternoon. We will be busy for about 7-8 hours on day one.
  • Day five is only half day. We will start with a synchronous check-in, followed by some asynchronous, individual work and the day will end with a synchronous meeting focusing on the next steps and saying goodbye.​ 

​Dr Cassim will be presenting on The Research Proposal, Research Design and Methodology and Thesis Writing (Tuesday – Thursday). The three days’ teaching for Dr Cassim will be a blend of online live teaching, self-study and applying the lessons learned during each session to your own work.​

  • ​There will be three live sessions daily:  The first is from 08:​00 – 09:00. This will be followed by a self-study session, in which ​delegates go through voice recorded PowerPoint slides on specific topics from Dr Cassim’s Postgraduate Toolkit (4th edition) until midday.  There is a second live session from 12:00 – 13:00, in which key concepts will be highlighted and delegates can ask the facilitator questions.  This will be followed by a quick lunch break and another self-study session from 13:30 until 15:00.  Our last session is from 15:00-16:00. Delegates have an opportunity to submit their exercises to Dr Cassim and receive individual written feedback​.
  • Delegates will require 7-8 hours per day in order to cover all the workshop material for that day. 
​Target audience
Delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently or who are in the early phase of their PhD and want to understand the background and context of the doctoral process. Delegates who are preparing for a research degree or project.

Course description

During the two book-end sessions of the workshop (Monday and Friday), Dr Herman will cover the Introduction to Doctoral Studies (Monday) and Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Friday). Dr Cassim will be on presenting how to The Research Proposal, Research Design and Methodology and Thesis Writing (Tuesday – Thursday).

Tuesday: The research proposal

  • Introduction to research – the history, context and philosophy of research
  • Key ethical considerations in research
  • Narrowing down the scope of the research project
  • The structure of a comprehensive research proposal, which each component discussed in detail
  • Key terminology, such as the research question, problem statement, aims and objectives
  • The 'golden thread’
​Wednesday: Research design and methodology
  • ​Defining research design and methodology
  • The importance of effective record keeping
  • Different types of data and how to choose the most appropriate data for your research: 
    • Primary and secondary
    • Qualitative and quantitative data 
  • 18 commonly-used research methods across a range of disciplines and how to choose the most appropriate method(s) for your research
  • Key concepts examiners are likely to raise:
    • ​Sampling, error, bias, reliability, validity, trustworthiness and pilot testing
  • Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
  • An example of a Research design and methodology chapter 
  • ​​Project management principles to structure and plan your research

Thursday: Thesis writing

  • ​Important initial considerations and possible stumbling blocks:
    • When to start writing
    • Institutional requirements regarding the thesis 
    • The editing process 
    • Writer's block 
    • Time management
    • Stress, health and quality of life challenges 

  • ​Different structures/ formats of a thesis​
  • How to write the thesis, with each chapter/ section discussed in detail
  • Writing a quality literature review
  • Theoretical frameworks and how to incorporate these in the thesis 
  • The thesis examination process ​
​          o​ University requirements
          o Typical examiners' questions and dealing with feedback
  • Common mistakes to avoid in academic writing.​​​​
​​  
Course outcomes

At the end of the course, participants should be able to:

Day 1: Introduction to doctoral studies

  • Position themselves within the doctoral landscape
  • Align their own goals and ideals with the criteria of a successful PhD
  • Reflect on and plan towards their own doctoral journey
  • Explore ‘doctorateness’ and identity development as key to doc-toral studies
  • Articulate their individual needs and expectations in terms of se-lecting a supervisor 
  • Identify the requisites for being resilient and successful in their PhD journey 

Day 2 (the research  proposal):
  • Understand the historical, philosophical, international and national contexts in which we do research;
  • Appreciate the significance of ethical considerations in guiding the research process;
  • Recognise the importance of critical reflective and self-reflexive thinking in research;
  • Narrow down the scope of your research project and justify how you  have done so;
  • Understand the importance of a well-conceptualised research pro-posal in guiding the successful execution of the research project;
  • Understand how the golden thread links the key components of the research project;
  • Develop a clear research question that will drive the whole project and from which all the other components of the proposal flow;
  • Develop a Gantt chart to holistically cover all the key activities in-volved in the research project;
  • Conduct an in-depth risk analysis to identify risk factors that could undermine the successful execution of the project, as well as de-velop contingency plans to address these; and
  • Write a comprehensive, detailed research proposal that meets your university’s requirements.

Day 3 (research design and methodology):

  • Define what research design and methodology is, and why careful planning is such a key component of this;
  • Appreciate the importance of effective record keeping;
  • Identify different types of data (primary and secondary; quantita-tive and qualitative), the advantages and disadvantages of each and explain why you have chosen a particular type of data;
  • Understand 18 commonly-used research methods across a range of disciplines and how to choose the most appropriate method(s) for your research;
  • Explain key concepts that examiners and reviewers are likely to raise, namely sampling error, sampling bias, non-sampling error, reliability, validity and trustworthiness, and what measures you are taking to address each of these;
  • Justify your choice of sample size(s) and sampling technique(s);
  • Conduct a pilot test correctly;
  • Justify your choice of data analysis methods;
  • Have a basic understanding of some key principles in descriptive and inferential statistical analysis;
  • Perform content analysis on qualitative data; and
  • Write up a well-structured and soundly conceptualised research design and methodology chapter.
Day 4 (thesis writing):​
  • Have a good writing and editing strategy or routine in place that allows you to complete your thesis in a reasonable amount of time;
  • Choose the most appropriate thesis structure for your kind of re-search;
  • Write each of the chapters or sections within the thesis in a de-tailed way that shows the logical unfolding of your research ques-tion and the golden thread;
  • Write a high quality literature review that shows an in-depth, criti-cal engagement with the views of various experts and scholars;
  • Understand what a theoretical framework is, where it goes in the thesis, the importance of being able to justify why you have chosen a particular theoretical framework and how to adapt or combine theoretical frameworks to suit your context;
  • Identify the difference between a full thesis and a mini-thesis or research report;
  • Comply with your university’s requirements of your thesis as well as requirements for the thesis submission process;
  • Understand what examiners will be looking for when marking your thesis and what the thesis examination process entails;
  • Avoid common mistakes in academic writing;
  • ​​​Improve your basic reading and comprehension skills;
  • Know the difference between thesis writing, scientific writing and popular writing for the media; and
  • Understand the structure and writing style used for the legal thesis.​
Day 5: Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Half day session​)
  • Realise the importance and responsibility of effectively sharing their research with various audiences utilising different platforms
  • Plan their research with a focus on dissemination from the start: From the oral examination to the conference presentation to writing an article
  • Apply the basics of academic writing in own writing practices
  • Appreciate the value of publishing from the PhD​
Course material
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 4th of July. For Dr Cassim’s three days, delegates will be using her Postgraduate Toolkit (4th edition), which will be made available online before the workshop.  The Toolkit is an e-book and multimedia resource that contains comprehensive written chapters and voice recordings of PowerPoint presentations on the different topics.  During the self-study sessions, delegates will listen to particular voice recordings on the Toolkit.​
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​Presenters​
​Prof Wim van Petegem (KU Leuven); Dr Sonja Strydom, Ms Magriet de Villiers and Ms Elzette le Roux (Stellenbosch University) 
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 1 July 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place from 4 to 8 July 2022 on MS Tea​ms
Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 08:30 - 17:00 daily and Friday 08:30 - 13:00 (excluding tea and lunch breaks).

​Cost
Rate: Early Bird: R6200 |​ Standard: R6700 
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close​

​FormatThe course Teaching in the Digital World: The use of blended active learning strategies will be offered as a fully online interactive course. There will be daily real-time lectures in the form of webinars, as well as structured self-paced learning activities for each day. The course will run over one week and it is expected of participants to commit four full days and a final half day to the course.
  • The facilitators will lead interactive discussions and facilitate the small group exercises and presentations. There will be a cap-stone activity on the last day of the course in which participants will reflect on their chosen blended active learning teaching project with the class in order to celebrate new skills, gain feedback on practical application as well as reflecting on the future as digitally fluent teachers.
  • Delegates are expected to actively participate in all course activities and help promote a classroom environment as a community of learners throughout the online course. Learning from peers will be an important part of this course as we jointly discuss key aspects of what it means to teach in the digital world.
​​Requirements
Participants should have a genuine interest in digital technologies and their application in teaching and learning. Some basic experience with the use of learning technologies in general might be helpful in the practical sessions.
​Target audience
The course is designed for the teacher of the future, from new lecturers to more senior academics from all disciplines, with a keen interest in teaching and learning at the one hand, and digital technologies at the other hand.
Participants should want to learn to: 
  • Further develop their skills on how to teach in the modern (digital) age; 
  • How to activate learners both in a face-to-face and an online learning environment; 
  • How to blend these different worlds into one new integrated learning experience; 
  • How to cope with fast moving new trends in digital learning technologies; 
  • How to apply these insights into their own practice as a teacher (and a learner), etc.​
​​What to bring?
It is required for the participants use own devices (laptop, smartphone) to participate in the course.​ Participants should also make sure they have reliable and fast internet to make sure that they are able to join the real-time webinars on Microsoft Teams, as well as to access the self-paced learning activities. 
Course description

The course will concentrate around the following themes: 

  • ​Understanding the basics of blended active learning as a foundation for good academic teaching
  • ​​Using digital tools for classroom-based active learning,
  • Going fully online as teacher and learner,
  • Blending classroom and online learning experiences into a meaningful integrated learning experience,
  • Reflecting through action research on your own practice as a teacher in the digital world.  ​

The course will include presentations of theoretical evidence-based concepts, models and frameworks, good practices, inspiring examples, practical illustrations, and interesting (open) resources, combined with hands-on exercises. Together with the instructors, course participants will work together and reflect on how to change their own practice as a teacher in the digital world.


Course outcomes
After completion of the course, the participants will be able to:
  • Describe the fundamentals of active- and blended learning and apply them into a classroom, a fully online and a blended learning environment;
  • Search, assess and use up-to-date learning technologies in order to improve their own teaching;
  • Design, develop and implement meaningful learning experiences in order to activate learners;
  • Apply action research for reflection on their own practice as a teacher in the digital world.


Course material

The course material will comprise slide sets, readings and journal articles, on-line tutorials, manuals, video material, provided in the sessions (and made available online), and partly co-created by the participants themselves​.

Course format
  • The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • The course will start in the morning with live class lectures,
  • You should allocate approximately 6 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.
  • Participants need to be available from 08:30 to 17:00 daily and Friday 08:30 to 13:00
What to bring
It is required for the participants use own devices (laptop, smartphone) to participate in the course. Participants should also make sure they have reliable and fast internet to make sure that they are able to join the real-time webinars on Microsoft Teams, as well as to access the self-paced learning activities. ​

 

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​PresenterProf Timothy C Guetterman (University of Michigan, USA)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 2 July  (45 minutes)
Course take place over the period 4 - 8 July 2022 on MS Teams. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:30 - 17:00 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks). Delegates will submit a work sheet/assignment at the end of each day that will be marked by Prof Guetterman.
​CostEarly Bird: R6200 |​ Standard: R6700​​
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close.
​Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is critical to come with an idea for a research project and topic. We will refine and work on it throughout the course.
​Target audienceThis course will benefit delegates who want to learn more about quantitative research design and methods. It is ideal for students who are at the early phases of their PhD, who can actively develop their proposal through the course. The course is highly interdisciplinary, as is the instructor, and will use examples from the education, social, and health sciences conducted across nations and settings. Those conducting natural science experimental research may be better suited by an experimental design course.
​What to bring?Please come with an idea for a research project or a research project underway.
Please be prepared to work on your project either through paper or electronically on your computer.  


Course description

Introduction to Quantitative Research Design is an introductory course to develop foundational quantitative research design knowledge and skills. Quantitative research may be broadly defined as an inquiry approach useful for describing trends and explaining the relationship among variables generally through collecting and analyzing numeric, closed-ended data​.

The primary expectation is that delegates will work on their project and exit with the building blocks of a quantitative research design. As a group, we will actively work on the major aspects of quantitative research designs, including the statement of the problem; purpose statements, research questions, or hypotheses; a specific quantitative design; data collection and analysis plans; and limitations. The course is interactive in that you will have short periods of time to work on your project and receive feedback live in addition to the lectures. The course will also include live demonstrations of using statistical software for analysis. Each lecture and demonstration will have a dedicated time for question-and-answer. The instructor is available for individuals consultations for a period of time daily. In addition, the instructor will provide written, individualized feedback about your research project.


At the completion of the course, students will have skills to:

  • Understand the process of conducting research using a quantitative approach
  • Specify a quantitative purpose, research question, or hypothesis
  • Plan quantitative data collection procedures
  • Select appropriate statistical analyses
  • Understand how to interpret and read statistical output
  • Understand the types of quantitative research designs including​​​  
    • Survey design
    • Correlational design
    • Quasi-experimental/ Experimental designs
  • Select and plan a research design
  • ​Understand threats to validity in quantitative research.


The course material are slides, which will be made available as handouts. Some readings will also be supplied. 

.The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.

  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and "virtual office hour” consultations.
  • Delegates will be required to deliver a presentation during the workshop with slides (PowerPoint or other).
  • Prof Guetterman will give feedback on questions and submissions. 
  • You should allocate about 6 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer​​.

​​​​​


Presenter​Dr Cindy Steenekamp  (Stellenbosch University)
​Duration
(In-person Course)
5 days​ course work on Stellenbosch University Campus
Course takes place over the period 4 - 8 July​ 2022. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 08:00 - 16:30 daily.
​Cost​​Early Bird: R7500 |​ Standard: R8000​​
​SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close.​
​Format
In-person course taking place on Stellenbosch University main campus.
​Requirements
Delegates must be computer literate and competent to register for this course.​
​Target audience
Postgraduate students, supervisors and researchers interested in acquiring quantitative research skills and techniques. This course is especially useful for participants who make use of surveys or want to conduct secondary data analysis based on survey research.
​Software
​​The SPSS classroom is equipped with computers which provide delegates with the latest version of SPSS. A license for the SPSS package for private use is not included in the price of the workshop and must either be purchased or provided by delegates or their institution if they wish to make use of the software. Please note that we cannot accommodate private laptops in the class.​

Course description
During this course, participants will be introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) – one of the most widely used social statistical packages in the world. It needs to be emphasized that this is an introductory course, ideally suited for first time users or participants with limited experience with the software program. Participants should be computer literate and competent as this is a computer-based course with an emphasis on skills transfer. 

This short course focuses specifically on the knowledge and skills required for quantitative data analysis. The broad objectives of this course are to provide participants with an understanding of the logic of quantitative data analysis and to give participants the opportunity to develop the practical computer skills required for data analysis.​
 
Course outcomes

When delegates have completed this course they should:

  • ​Be familiar with the layout and basic functioning of SPSS
  • Be able to create and maintain a database
  • Be able to do a summary analysis of a data set - produce frequencies, descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and comparison of means
  • Be able to manipulate data - recode, treat missing values and construct a variable
  • Be able to graphically illustrate data using a variety of chart options
  • Be able to interpret and present the ensuing results​​​​
  • The following aspects are covered:​
​       Levels of measurement, creating and editing a data file, transporting a file from Excel
        o  Univariate analyses: Frequencies and summary statistics
        o  Bivariate analyses: Cross-tabulations and comparison of means
        o  Inspecting variables: Recoding variables, computing variables, select-ing cases and splitting files

Class slides; homework exercises and homework memo. No prescribed textbook.





PresenterProf Wayne Babchuk (Prof Wayne A Babchuk (University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA) & Dr Deborah Skinstad (Stellenbosch University)​​
​Duration​​1 day orientation + 5 days course work
Orientation will take place on 7 July 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place from 11 to 15 July 2022 on MS Tea​ms. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:30 - 17:00 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks).
Cost​​Early Bird: R6200 |​ Standard: R6700​​
​SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close.​
​Format
Blend of online teaching and self-paced practice sessions.
​RequirementsImportant for Advanced course: Participants are expected to have had some background in qualitative or mixed methods research and be prepared to discuss their own work they are conducting or planning to conduct in the future.
​Target audience
Delegates are expected to have a basic understanding of qualitative research so that the primary focus of the course is to help participants make informed and strategic decisions regarding the conduct of their qualitative or mixed methods dissertation research (or other research projects). Delegates are expected to have had some form of prior instruction in qualitative research methodology either through ADA or from their previous training at their host institutions.
​What to bring?
Participants should bring to the class their qualitative research projects they are currently working on or are interested in working on in the near future. The course will employ interactive and systematic feedback from the instructor AND course participants as we discuss each student’s research project and their research interests from design to implementation to publication of their work.​​


Course description

Advanced Qualitative Research Design and Implementation is an interdisciplinary advanced course structured to benefit students seeking to improve their qualitative skills and hone their abilities to conduct research at the highest level. 
Part 1 provides a concise overview of foundational knowledge underpinning the qualitative enterprise including:
  • The history, ethics, and epistemological foundations of qualitative research;
  • Key characteristics of qualitative methods;
  • Differences between qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research;
  • Underlying assumptions, procedures, challenges, and applications of several popular contemporary qualitative approaches.
 Part 2 focuses on the systematic conduct of qualitative research including:
  • Formulating qualitative purpose statements and research questions;
  • Use of literature and sampling strategies in qualitative research;
  • Data collection and analysis techniques;
  • Validation strategies needed to achieve rigor and trustworthiness and evaluate and assess qualitative research studies.
Part 3 constitutes the heart of this course and focuses on:
  • Advancing student research projects through instructor and participants’ collaborative feedback on students’ designs;
  • Development of expertise in the approach/sub-approach employed by course participants in their individual research projects;
  • Turning doctoral research into professional presentations and publishable articles;
  • Presenting individuals’ well-crafted designs to the class.


Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to:

  • Identify important traditions, themes, scholars, and publications that define the history and application of qualitative research;
  • Articulate ethical practices needed to successfully conduct research;
  • Describe philosophical assumptions, paradigms, and theoretical orientations underlying qualitative research;
  • Identify characteristics of qualitative research and key differences between qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches;
  • Describe types, procedures, challenges, and applications of contemporary approaches/sub-approaches to qualitative inquiry;
  • Develop clearly stated purpose statements and research questions;
  • Determine effective strategies for sampling in qualitative research (sites and participants);
  • Employ validation strategies as appropriate (rigor and trustworthiness);
  • Design effective data collection, analysis, interpretation, and representation strategies;
  • Demonstrate expertise in one or more of the major approaches and sub-approaches to qualitative inquiry;
  • Design and conduct a rigorous qualitative study that provides a solid foundation for doctoral dissertations and subsequent professional presentations/publications in students' fields;
  • Present the design, implementation, and findings (if applicable) of individual research projects to the class. 


The course material are slides available as handouts and on the course web page. Some readings are also provided.​
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts. 

​Advanced Qualitative Research Design and Methodology will meet four and one-half days beginning at 09:00 daily and continue until the afternoon with group and individual exercises to complete for the next day. All instruction will be remotely delivered with a mix of live online teaching, group and individual presentations, exercises, and discussions.

  • The presenter and facilitator will lead interactive discussions and facilitate the small group exercises and presentations.
  • Delegates are expected to actively participate in all course activities and help promote a classroom environment as a community of learners throughout the workshop. Learning from peers will be an important part of this course as we jointly discuss key aspects of qualitative research design and implementation.
  • Please plan to allocate six to seven hours per day to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives, apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.




PresenterProf Prof Liezel Frick & Dr Sonja Strydom (Stellenbosch University)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 7 July 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place from  11 - 15  July 2022 on MS Teams. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:30 - 17:00 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks).
​Cost​​Rate: Early Bird: R6200 |​ Standard: R6700​​
​SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close.​
​Format
Blend of online teaching and self-paced practice sessions.
​Requirements
Basic computer literacy. Access to a wi-fi enabled laptop / tablet for the duration of the course. Delegates should have a Gmail account to access some online resources.
All disciplines considering supervising a PhD by publication are welcome.
​Target audienceSupervisors interested in exploring PhD by publication as alternative to the monograph thesis. Applicants should be about to graduate with their PhDs, or are already supervising a thesis.

Course description

During this hands-on course, participants will be introduced to a number of themes related to a PhD by publication. We will begin the journey of discovery by highlighting the main tenets of PhD by publication. In particular, we will draw on the differences between a monograph and thesis by publication. During this session we will also explore institutional policies related to this format and how agency and power relations could be considered in moving a conversation about this format further in an institution. 

The next theme focuses on raising awareness of the pedagogical approaches associated with PhD by publication. Feedback and critical views from practicing and experienced supervisors will form the basis of this theme. This theme will be followed by a practical session where emphasis will be placed on the development of a supervision framework which could benefit both student and supervisor. The last two themes underline the importance of sharing scholarly work based on this format with the broader community. Firstly, we will examine the different steps to consider when deciding to publish one of the articles in the thesis in academic journals. This will be followed by an exploration of alternative ways of sharing your scholarly voice. Particular emphasis will be placed on various modes of online dissemination of your scholarly work. 


Course outcomes

​After completion of the course, participants will be able to: 

  • Outline the main differences between a monograph and thesis by publication
  • Explore context-specific pedagogical approaches relevant to their own institutions 
  • Critically explore the different aspects related to the development of a supervision framework
  • Understand the various facets to be considered when preparing for article publication in an academic journal  
  • Highlight alternative online modes of sharing their scholarly voice with a broader community

The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course.

The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.

  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • You should allocate about 6 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer




PresenterProf Ruth Albertyn (Centre for Higher and Adult Education, Stellenbosch University and USB Business School)​
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 08 July 2022 (30 minutes)
Course takes place from 11 - 15 July 2022 on MS Teams from 09:00 to 16:30. There will be daily classes, but delegates are expected to work on their writing in between live sessions, and meet with the facilitator.
​Cost​​Rate:Early Bird: R6700 |​ Standard: R7500​​
​SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close.​
​Capacity
8 delegates
This course is kept small purposely due to the one-on-one interaction with the presenter.​
​Format
This course will involve a blend of online teaching and self-paced sessions. 
​Requirements
Participants must have the following in place before the course commences:
  • The first rough draft of an article based on completed research (for example completed data analysis or completed section of the litera-ture review)
  • Identified a journal where you would like to submit an article
  • The guidelines for authors of this journal
  • A laptop to use during the workshop (not only a tablet or iPad)
  • Stable internet connection for use over MS Teams (for instruction), accessing the online materials and submitting your daily drafts to Prof Albertyn.
  • Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to en-sure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course.
​Target audienceThis course is aimed at doctoral candidates who have already begun their doctoral research project and are at a stage where they have completed some sections of their research and have publishable material from any part of their study. It is essential that the data has already been analysed or the literature already collected as there is not sufficient time for these tasks during the workshop.  The focus of this workshop is on actual writing of the article and there is thus minimal formal lecturing during the workshop.
​What to bring?
The first rough draft of an article based on completed research (for example completed data analysis or completed section of the literature review

Course description

During this hands-on course, participants plan and write an article for publication in a scholarly journal. Participants work on material from their doctoral studies, and it is essential for this workshop to have a draft manuscript to work on during your time with the ADA. Minimal input is provided by the facilitator and participants then spend workshop time crafting their article with one-on-one discussion and feedback from facilitator during the writing process.


Course outcomes

After completion of the course, the participant will have a completed article which can be submitted for consideration by the intended journal. Throughout the week: 

  • ​Input is provided on each section of the article​
  • Participants write the relevant section
  • Facilitator reads work and provides feedback
  • Participants redraft before writing the next section of the article


The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course.

  • Each day starts with a presentation that will take place virtually on MS Teams promptly at 09:00, followed by writing and personal feedback sessions
  • We check in again at 14:00 each afternoon
  • Participants need to be available from 09:00 to 16:30 (excluding breaks and lunchtime) for the duration of the course
Please arrange for strong internet connectivity during the brief presentation slots indicated on the programme at 9h00 and at 14h00 each day. No recordings will be made of the sessions each day due to the design of the workshop that follows an experiential learning approach with direct application following input. The focus is on maximal time for writing after input; with critical reading, feedback and one-one one consultation with the facilitator during the week.





PresenterMs Selene Delport  (Writing Lab, Stellenbosch University)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will take place on 8 July 2022 (45 minutes)
Course takes place from 11 - 15 July 2022​​​. Delegates will be expected to be available for the programme from 09:00 - 17:00 daily (excluding tea and lunch breaks).
​Cost
​​Early Bird: R6200 |​ Standard: R6700​​
​SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain the Early Bird price until bookings close.​
​Requirements
Delegates are expected to log in on the system before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand and a compulsory orientation will take place on 8 July 2022, while the hands-on instruction will take place from 11 - 15 July 2022
​Target audience
Delegates who have already started writing their proposals and want practical support to improve their proposals and present a well-argued document to the various proposal committees. 
​What to bring?
Delegates are encouraged to share drafts of their own writing during the workshop, if they feel comfortable doing so. All writers and their writing will be treated with respect.

Course description

The facilitator will start with the purpose of the proposal and using micro-writing to plan your proposal.

Monday

  • Purpose of a research proposal/protocol
  • Planning your research proposal/protocol
  • The external structure of a proposal
  • Tiny texts as planning tools: formulating a research problem, aims, and hypothesis
  • One-to-one consultations, online writing exercises, and preparation for the next day

Tuesday

  • Constructing a title
  • Introducing your potential research
  • Introduction models
  • One-to-one consultations, online writing exercises, and preparation for the next day

Wednesday

  • Writing the preliminary literature review
  • Writing the design and methodology
  • One-to-one consultations, online writing exercises, and preparation for the next day

Thursday

  • Integrating sources effectively
  • Paraphrasing or quoting?
  • Developing your own academic voice
  • One-to-one consultations, online writing exercises, and preparation for the next day

Friday

  • Using different argumentation structures
  • Argumentation problems
  • Argumentation strategies
  • One-to-one consultations and writing exercises

Course outcomes

At the end of the course, participants should be able to:

  • Develop their own proposals/protocols
  • Refine their own academic voices
  • Use different argumentation structures effectively to create a persuasive proposal/protocol


The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • You should allocate about 6 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer​ ​