African Doctoral Academy
Welcome to Stellenbosch University

Workshop information

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Please click on the course you would like to read more about.​​​​

ADA Online Summer School 2021

13 January - 5 February 2021 

Full programme and further information are listed here
​Application form can be found here​.

​​​​​​​Course 1: Fundamentals of research design and methods

Course 2: Scientific communication: Article writing and giving presentations​​

Course 3: Introduction to Quantitative research design and methodology​

Course 4: Introduction to Qualitative research design and methodology  

Course 5: Preparing for your PhD: Considerations and planning your research project​

Course 6: Advanced qualitative research design and methodology  

Course 7The Productive PhD​​​​​​​

Course 8: The Quantitative PhD: From philosophy to study design, data analysis and reporting  

Course 9Mixed methods in research design​​​​​​​​

Course 10Good research practice: Research ethics, data quality, implementation and beyond ​ 

Course 11Applying scenario planning as a research method and thinking tool​​​​​​​​

Course 12Academic writing for publications: An introduction ​ 

Course 13: The systematic review​​​​​​​​

Course 14Introduction to implementation science: Und​​erstanding the implementation of practices or policies 

Free webinar: Creating an academic vision and the habits that make it a reality​



Course 1: Fundamentals of research design methods

​Presenter Prof Tim Guetterman (University of Michigan, USA & Stellenbosch University) Waiting list forming
​Duration
1 day orientation +  3 days course work
Orientation will be open from the 11th of January 2021
Course takes place over the period 13 - 15 January 2021
​Cost
​Flat rate of R4 300​
​​Requirements
​​Delegates are expected to log in on the system before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open beforehand and a compulsory orientation will take place on Monday 11 January, while the hands-on instruction will take place from the 13th to the 15th of January.
​Target audience
This course will help delegates who are developing a research proposal. It aims to provide a useful preparation for either of the week long Introduction to Quantitative or Introduction to Qualitative Research courses. It is also designed to benefit Delegates who are embarking on independent research for the first time or delegates who need a refresher before starting their PhDs. For example, if you have taken time after your Master’s, are changing directions, or simply need a refresher, this course provides and accessible introduction to research fundamentals. In particular, it will be helpful to delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently or who are in the early phase of their PhD or preparing for a research degree or project.

Course Description

This course offers a preparation on the fundamentals of research from a research methods and research design orientation. This introductory course will provide an overview of research in general along with a brief overview of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research. The goal is to exit with an understanding of the basic elements of research and to be able to apply concepts to develop a research plan. The course will also prepare you for future courses, such as the Introduction to Qualitative Research or Introduction to Quantitative Research.
 
Our major topics include:

  • Defining research
  • Understanding the importance of research
  • Identifying a research problem to study of appropriate scope
  • Reviewing the literature
  • Specifying an objective, purpose, research questions, or hypotheses
  • Collecting quantitative data
  • Analyzing and interpreting quantitative data
  • Collecting qualitative data
  • Analyzing and interpreting qualitative data
  • Selecting a research design
  • 3 Major quantitative designs
  • 3 Major qualitative designs
  • Mixed methods designs
  • Writing and Evaluating Research

Course outcomes
At the end of the course, participants should be able to:
  • Describe and apply fundamentals of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research to a plan or proposal
  • Identify a research problem to study of appropriate scope
  • Write an objective, purpose statement, aim, or research question as appropriate to your discipline.
  • Develop a plan for data collection and analysis
  • Defend their choice of methods and research design
  • Apply criteria to evaluate research 
Course material
The course materials will be made available online on the day, but delegates will be required to log in before the course starts and complete the course orientation ​

Course format
​The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching.
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and  "virtual office hour” consultations.
  • Delegates will be required to deliver a presentation during the workshop with slides (PowerPoint or other).
  • Prof Guetterman will give feedback on questions and submissions. 
  • ​You should allocate 6 - 7 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer


Course 2: Scientific communication: Article writing and giving presentations​

​Presenters​
​Prof John Creemers (​KU Leuven, Belgium​) and Ms Vicky Davis (Media expert and presenter)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation take place on Wednesday 13th January 2021
Course take place over the period 18 - 22 January 2021
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600
​​Requirements
The participants need to be able to read and understand a scientific publication in their field. Delegates will be asked to deliver a presentation (with slideshow), and have to bring either their own manuscript or a (research NOT review) manuscript from your field.​
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 13 - 22 January, while the hands-on instruction will take place on the 18 - 22 January 2021.
​Target audience
PhD researchers who are going to present a poster or give an oral presentation at a scientific meeting, or need to write an IMRAD-structured (Introduction, Materials & Methods, Results And Discussion) manuscript for publication.
​​
Course description
This course will explain the principles of effective communication, how to make and present a poster at a scientific meeting, how to analyse and write an IMRAD-structured scientific article, and how to give an oral presentation with slideshow. Finally, we will discuss how to answer questions and how to deal with nerves.

Course outcomes
  • The principles of effective communication
  • How to have an impact with a poster
  • The principle of an elevator pitch
  • The peer-review process in publishing
  • The composition of an IMRAD-based manuscript
  • How to write an IMRAD-based manuscript
  • How to make an effective slideshow
  • How to give an oral presentation with slideshow
  • How to answer questions after a presentation
  • How to deal with nerves​
Course material
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 18th of January. ​

Course format
  • The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles:
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching. 
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and  "virtual office hour” consultations.
  • Delegates will be required to deliver a presentation during the workshop with slides (PowerPoint or other)
  • the Presenters will give you feedback on your submissions. 
  • ​You should allocate 6 - 7 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.
​​

Course 3: Introduction to quantitative research design and methodology

​​Presenters​
​Prof Tim Guetterman (University of Michigan, USA & Stellenbosch University)
Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 13th of January
Course takes place over the period 18 - 22 January 2021

​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600

​Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is critical to come with an idea for a research project and topic. We will refine and work on it throughout the course.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 13 - 26 January​, while the hands-on instruction will take place from 18 - 22 January 2​021.
​​Target audience
​This course will benefit delegates who want to learn more about quantitative research design and methods. It is idea for students who are at the early phases of their PhD, who can actively develop their proposal through the course. The course is highly interdisciplinary, as is the instructor, and will use examples from the education, social, and health sciences conducted across nations and settings. Those conducting natural sciences experiments may be better suited by an experimental design course.
​​What to bring?
Please come with an idea for a research project or a research project underway. 


Course Description
Introduction to Quantitative Research Design is an introductory course to develop foundational quantitative research design knowledge and skills. Quantitative research may be broadly defined as an inquiry approach useful for describing trends and explaining the relationship among variables generally through collecting and analyzing numeric, closed-ended data.

The primary expectation is that delegates will work on their project and exit with the building blocks of a quantitative research design. As a group, we will actively work on the major aspects of quantitative research designs, including the statement of the problem; purpose statements, research questions, or hypotheses; a specific quantitative design; data collection and analysis plans; and limitations. The course will include live demonstrations of using statistical software for analysis. The instructor is available for individual consultations for a period of time daily, after the last formal session of the day.
Course Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will have the skills to:
  • Understand the process of conducting research using a quantitative approach
  • Specify a quantitative purpose, research question, or hypothesis
  • Understand the use of literature in quantitative research
  • Plan quantitative data collection procedures
  • Select appropriate statistical analyses
  • Understand how to interpret and read statistical output 
  • Understand the types of quantitative research designs including
    • Survey design
    • Correlational design
    • Quasi-experimental/ Experimental designs
  • Select and plan a research design
  • Understand threats to validity in quantitative research

Course material

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
T
he course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 18th of January. 


Course format
  • ​The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching. 
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and  "virtual office hour” consultations.
  • Delegates will be required to deliver a presentation during the workshop with slides (PowerPoint or other).
  • Prof Guetterman will give feedback on questions and submission.
  • ​You should allocate 6 - 7 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.
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Course 4: Introduction to qualitative research design and methodology

​​Presenters​
​Prof Wayne A Babchuk (University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA), with Ms Deborah Skinstad (Stellenbosch University)
Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 13th of January 2021
Course take place over the period 18 - 22 January 2021

​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600

​Requirements
No methodology or research design pre-requisites are required: This workshop will be taught as an introductory course. A general understanding of research methodology may be helpful as we will compare key aspects of qualitative research to more historically accepted quantitative methods.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 13 - 22 January 2021, while the hands-on instruction will take place from 18 - 22 January 2​021.
​​Target audience
​This course will benefit participants who want to learn more about and fine-tune their skills in qualitative design and implementation. The course will have a strong holistic and interdisciplinary focus and draw upon examples from the social and health sciences and education over time and across cultures.


Course Description
Introduction to Qualitative Research Design and Methodology is an introductory course presented in two parts. 

Part 1 provides fundamental knowledge of several interlocking topics important to our understanding of qualitative research methodology design and implementation including: 
  • The history of qualitative research across disciplines;
  • The ethics and responsible conduct of research; 
  • The epistemological or philosophical assumptions underlying qualitative designs;
  • Key attributes and procedures of contemporary qualitative approaches including basic qualitative research, narrative, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, grounded ethnography, case study, and participatory action research.

Part 2 extends our understanding of these qualitative approaches as participants learn more about the practice and conduct of qualitative research. As a community of learners, we will focus on the core processes of qualitative design and implementation including:
Writing problem statements, purpose statements, and research questions;
  • Qualitative sampling strategies;
  • Data collection and analysis techniques;
  • Validity, reliability and trustworthiness in qualitative research;
  • Writing qualitative doctoral dissertations and turning doctoral research into professional presentations and publishable articles.
This course will draw upon examples from participants’ own research interests that we will hone through collaborative problem-solving and instructional strategies. Upon completion of this course, participants will gain a deeper understanding of qualitative research and will have refined and practiced the skills needed to design and conduct their own studies.

Course Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will have the skills to:
  • Identify key traditions and eras in the history of qualitative inquiry;
  • Recognize important ethical issues in research;
  • Distinguish among the epistemological assumptions undergirding qualitative research;
  • Articulate principles and practices of contemporary qualitative research;
  • Design qualitative research studies;
  • Develop qualitative data collection, analysis, and interpretation techniques;
  • Describe how validity, reliability, and generalizability are addressed in qualitative research;
  • Write evaluate, and publish qualitative research studies

Course material

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 18th of January. 


Course format
Introduction to Qualitative Research Design and Methodology will meet four and one-half days beginning at 09:00 daily and continue until the afternoon with group and individual exercises to complete for the next day. All instruction will be remotely delivered with a mix of live online teaching, 
group and individual presentations, exercises, and discussions. 
  • The presenter and facilitator will lead interactive discussions and facilitate the small group exercises and presentations. 
  • Delegates are expected to actively participate in all course activities and help promote a classroom environment as a community of learners throughout the workshop. Learning from peers will be an important part of this course as we jointly discuss key aspects of qualitative research design and implementation. 
  •  Please plan to allocate six to seven hours per day to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives, apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.

Course 5: Preparing for the PhD: Considerations and planning your research project

Presenter ​Dr Layla Cassim (ERS consultants) & Dr Nicoline Herman (Stellenbosch University)
​​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 13th of January 2021​
Course take place over the period 18 - 22 January 2021
​Cost 
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200 + R400 Toolkit
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close​
Standard Rate: R6 600​​ + R400 Toolkit​

​Requirements
There are no prerequisite requirements for this course, as it is a preparatory course aimed at providing delegates with the background and context of the doctoral process.
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 13 - 22 January, while the hands-on instruction will take place on the 18 - 22 January 2021.​
​Target audience
Delegates planning to start their PhDs imminently or who are in the early phase of their PhD and want to understand the background and context of the doctoral process. Delegates who are preparing for a research degree or project.​​

Course​ description
During the two book-end sessions of the workshop (Monday and Friday), Dr Herman will cover the Introduction to Doctoral Studies (Monday) and Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Friday). Dr Cassim will be on presenting how to The Research Proposal, Research Design and Methodology and Thesis Writing (Tuesday – Thursday).

Monday: Introduction to doctoral studies
  • Positioning yourself within the doctoral landscape
  • Aligning your own goals and ideals with the criteria of a successful PhD
  • Reflecting on your own doctoral journey: experienced or envisaged
  • Exploring identity development as key to doctoral studies
  • Selecting a supervisor and exploring different supervisory roles
  • Building resilience in your studies
Tuesday: The research proposal
  • Introduction to research – the history, context and philosophy of research
  • Key ethical considerations in research
  • Narrowing down the scope of the research project
  • The structure of a comprehensive research proposal, which each component discussed in detail
  • Key terminology, such as the research question, problem statement, aims and objectives
  • The 'golden thread’
Wednesday: Research design and methodology
  • Defining research design and methodology
  • The importance of effective record keeping 
  • Different types of data and how to choose the most appropriate data for your research:
    • Primary and secondary
    • Qualitative and quantitative data 
  • 18 commonly-used research methods across a range of disciplines and how to choose the most appropriate method(s) for your research
  • Key concepts examiners are likely to raise: 
    • Sampling, error, bias, reliability, validity and pilot testing
  • Qualitative and quantitative data analysis 
  • An example of a Research design and methodology chapter
  • Project management principles to structure and plan your research 
Thursday: Thesis writing
  • Important initial considerations and possible stumbling blocks:
    •  When to start writing 
    •  Institutional requirements regarding the thesis 
    •  The editing process
    •  Writer's block 
    •  Time management
    •  Stress, health and quality of life challenges 
  • Different structures/ formats of a thesis
  • How to write the thesis, with each chapter/ section discussed in detail
  • Writing a quality literature review
  • Theoretical frameworks and how to incorporate these in the thesis 
  • The thesis examination process 
    •  University requirements
    •  Typical examiners' questions and dealing with feedback
  • Common mistakes to avoid in academic writing.
Friday: Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Half day session)
  • Planning and conducting your research with a focus on dissemination: From the oral examination to the conference presentation to writing an article
  • Introducing academic writing
  • Publishing from your PhD​

Course outcomes
At the end of the course, the delegates will be able to:

Day 1: Introduction to doctoral studies

  • Position themselves within the doctoral landscape
  • Align their own goals and ideals with the criteria of a successful PhD
  • Reflect on and plan towards their own doctoral journey
  • Explore 'doctorateness' and identity development as key to doctoral studies
  • Articulate their individual needs and expectations in terms of selecting a supervisor
  • Identify the requisites for being resilient and successful in their PhD journey

​Day 2: The research proposal

  • Understand the historical, philosophical, international and national contexts in which we do research;
  • Appreciate the significance of ethical considerations in guiding the research process;
  • Recognise the importance of critical reflective and self-reflexive thinking in research;
  • Narrow down the scope of your research project and justify how you [l2] have done so;
  • Understand the importance of a well-conceptualised research proposal in guiding the successful execution of the research project;
  • Understand how the golden thread links the key components of the research project;
  • Develop a clear research question that will drive the whole project and from which all the other components of the proposal flow;
  • Develop a Gantt chart to holistically cover all the key activities involved in the research project;
  • Conduct an in-depth risk analysis to identify risk factors that could undermine the successful execution of the project, as well as develop contingency plans to address these; and
  • Write a comprehensive, detailed research proposal that meets your university's requirements.

Day 3: Research design and methodology

  • Define what research design and methodology is, and why careful planning is such a key component of this;
  • Appreciate the importance of effective record keeping;
  • Identify different types of data (primary and secondary; quantitative and qualitative), the advantages and disadvantages of each and explain why you have chosen a particular type of data;
  • Understand 18 commonly-used research methods across a range of disciplines and how to choose the most appropriate method(s) for your research;
  • Explain key concepts that examiners and reviewers are likely to raise, namely sampling error, sampling bias, non-sampling error, reliability, validity and trustworthiness, and what measures you are taking to address each of these;
  • Justify your choice of sample size(s) and sampling technique(s);
  • Conduct a pilot test correctly;
  • Justify your choice of data analysis methods;
  • Have a basic understanding of some key principles in descriptive and inferential statistical analysis;
  • Perform content analysis on qualitative data; and
  • Write up a well-structured and soundly conceptualised research design and methodology chapter.

Day 4: Thesis writing

  • Have a good writing and editing strategy or routine in place that allows you to complete your thesis in a reasonable amount of time;
  • Choose the most appropriate thesis structure for your kind of research;
  • Write each of the chapters or sections within the thesis in a detailed way that shows the logical unfolding of your research question and the golden thread;
  • Write a high quality literature review that shows an in-depth, critical engagement with the views of various experts and scholars;
  • Understand what a theoretical framework is, where it goes in the thesis, the importance of being able to justify why you have chosen a particular theoretical framework and how to adapt or combine theoretical frameworks to suit your context;
  • Identify the difference between a full thesis and a mini-thesis or research report;
  • Comply with your university's requirements of your thesis as well as requirements for the thesis submission process;
  • Understand what examiners will be looking for when marking your thesis and what the thesis examination process entails;
  • Avoid common mistakes in academic writing;
  • Improve your basic reading and comprehension skills;
  • Know the difference between thesis writing, scientific writing and popular writing for the media; and
  • Understand the structure and writing style used for the legal thesis.

Day 5: Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start 

  • Realise the importance and responsibility of effectively sharing their research with various audiences utilising different platforms
  • Plan their research with a focus on dissemination from the start: From the oral examination to the conference presentation to writing an article
  • Apply the basics of academic writing in own writing practices
  • Appreciate the value of publishing from the PhD

Course material
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 18th of January. 
​For Dr Cassim's three days, delegates will be using her Postgraduate Toolkit (4th edition), which will be made available online before the workshop.  The Toolkit is an e-book and multimedia resource that contains comprehensive written chapters and voice recordings of PowerPoint presentations on the different topics.  During the self-study sessions, delegates will listen to particular voice recordings on the Toolkit.

Course format
During the two book-end sessions of the workshop (Monday and Friday), Dr Herman will cover the Introduction to Doctoral Studies (Monday) and Thinking about dissemination of your research right from the start (Friday). Dr Herman will use a blend of online (synchronous) teaching, self-study (asynchronous) and individual and group activities (synchronous and asynchronous). 

  • At the beginning of day 1, everyone will introduce themselves. The rest of the morning will be an interesting mix of synchronous sessions as well as asynchronous activities completed individually and in smaller groups. After lunch we will start with a synchronous session before you embark on self-study and reflection for the rest of the afternoon. We will be busy for about 7-8 hours on day one.
  • Day five is only half day. We will start with a synchronous check-in, followed by some asynchronous, individual work and the day will end with a synchronous meeting focusing on the next steps and saying goodbye.

Dr Cassim will be on presenting how to The Research Proposal, Research Design and Methodology and Thesis Writing (Tuesday – Thursday). The three days' teaching for Dr Cassim will be a blend of online live teaching, self-study and applying the lessons learned during each session to your own work.

  • There will be three live sessions daily:  
    • The first is from 08h30 – 09h30. This will be followed by a self-study session, in which delegates go through voice recorded PowerPoint slides on specific topics from Dr Cassim's Postgraduate Toolkit (4th edition) until midday.  
    • There is a second live session from 12h00 – 13h00, in which key concepts will be highlighted and delegates can ask the facilitator questions.  This will be followed by a quick lunch break and another self-study session from 13h30 until 15h00.  
    • Our last session is from 15h00-16h00.​
  • Delegates will require 8 hours per day in order to cover all the workshop material for that day.

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​​Presenters​
​Prof Wayne A Babchuk (University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA ), with Ms Deborah Skinstad (Stellenbosch University)
Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 20th of January 2021
Course take place over the period 25 - 29 January

​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600

​Requirements
No methodology or research design pre-requisites are required: This workshop will be taught as an introductory course. A general understanding of research methodology may be helpful as we will compare key aspects of qualitative research to more historically accepted quantitative methods.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 20 - 29 January while the hands-on instruction will take place from 25 - 29 January 2021.
​​Target audience
​Delegates are expected to have a basic understanding of qualitative research so that the primary focus of the course is to help participants make informed and strategic decisions regarding the conduct of their qualitative or mixed methods dissertation research (or other research projects). Delegates are expected to have had some form of prior instruction in qualitative research methodology either through ADA or from their previous training at their host institutions.
What to bring?
Participants should bring to the class their qualitative research projects they are currently working on or are interested in working on in the near future. The course will employ interactive and systematic feedback from the instructor AND course participants as we discuss each student’s research project and their research interests from design to implementation to publication of their work.


Course Description
Advanced Qualitative Research Design and Implementation is an interdisciplinary advanced course structured to benefit students seeking to improve their qualitative skills and hone their abilities to conduct research at the highest level. 
Part 1 provides a concise overview of foundational knowledge underpinning the qualitative enterprise including:
  • The history, ethics, and epistemological foundations of qualitative research;
  • Key characteristics of qualitative methods;
  • Differences between qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research;
  • Underlying assumptions, procedures, challenges, and applications of several popular contemporary qualitative approaches.
Part 2 focuses on the systematic conduct of qualitative research including:
  • ​Formulating qualitative purpose statements and research questions;
  • Use of literature and sampling strategies in qualitative research;
  • Data collection and analysis techniques;
  • Validation strategies needed to achieve rigor and trustworthiness and evaluate and assess qualitative research studies.
Part 3 constitutes the heart of this course and focuses on:
  • Advancing student research projects through instructor and participants’ collaborative feedback on students’ designs;
  • ​Development of expertise in the approach/sub-approach employed by course participants in their individual research projects;
  • Turning doctoral research into professional presentations and publishable articles;
  • Presenting individuals’ well-crafted designs to the class.

Course Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to:
  • Identify important traditions, themes, scholars, and publications that define the history and application of qualitative research;
  • Articulate ethical practices needed to successfully conduct research;
  • Describe philosophical assumptions, paradigms, and theoretical orientations underlying qualitative research;
  • Identify characteristics of qualitative research and key differences between qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches;
  • Describe types, procedures, challenges, and applications of contemporary approaches/sub-approaches to qualitative inquiry;
  • Develop clearly stated purpose statements and research questions;
  • Determine effective strategies for sampling in qualitative research (sites and participants);
  • ​Employ validation strategies as appropriate (rigor and trustworthiness);
  • Design effective data collection, analysis, interpretation, and representation strategies;
  • Demonstrate expertise in one or more of the major approaches and sub-approaches to qualitative inquiry;
  • ​Design and conduct a rigorous qualitative study that provides a solid foundation for doctoral dissertations and subsequent professional presentations/publications in students’ fields;
  • Present the design, implementation, and findings (if applicable) of individual research projects to the class.
Course material

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
T
he course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 20th of January 2021

Course format
Advanced Qualitative Research Design and Methodology will meet four and one-half days beginning at 09:00 daily and continue until the afternoon with group and individual exercises to complete for the next day. All instruction will be remotely delivered with a mix of live online teaching, 
group and individual presentations, exercises, and discussions. 
  • The presenter and facilitator will lead interactive discussions and facilitate the small group exercises and presentations. 
  • Delegates are expected to actively participate in all course activities and help promote a classroom environment as a community of learners throughout the workshop. Learning from peers will be an important part of this course as we jointly discuss key aspects of qualitative research design and implementation. 
  •  Please plan to allocate six to seven hours per day to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives, apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.
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​ ​​

Course 7: The Productive PhD​

​Presenters​
​Prof Sebastian Kernbach (​University of St. Gallen, Switzerland​)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 20th of January 2021
Course take place over the period 25- 29 January 2021
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600
​​Requirements
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 20 - 29 January, while the hands-on instruction will take place on the 25 - 29 January 2021.
​Target audience
The course is designed for PhD students and researcher at all levels who wish to be more productive, making progress through visual thinking and finding ways to get unstuck. You do not have to consider yourself to be good at drawing or creative, an open mind for new methods and tools is helpful.
​About design thinking
​Simply put, design thinking is a method for problem solving, popularized in the early 1990s by applying it to product design. Since that time, a variety of design thinking approaches have been applied to an ever-increasing range of challenges including research challenges. Think of it as a constellation of iterative steps and best practices for tackling complexity rather than a specific process.
​​
Course description
In this hands-on one-week workshop, participants will have the opportunity to apply visual thinking and design thinking tools and methods to their own research projects. They will apply simple and easy to learn visual tools to structure their ideas, literature, academic discourses, and potential contributions, among others. Through the process of prototyping and iterating they will gain clarity in their PhDs and for their future research careers. In addition, interventions from the field of positive psychology and positive leadership will help participants to overcome blocks and flourish in their PhD.
 
Based on the design thinking framework and mind-set established at the design school at Stanford University, participants will gain creative confidence in their research process and when facing challenges, get problem-solving abilities to better deal with ambiguity using analytical skills and creative intelligence and improve their emotional well-being by being proactive about their emotional needs which ultimately leads to improved productivity.
 
The goal of this workshop is to recognize the creative, playful mind-set that underlies successful innovation in scholarship and explore how design thinking can improve the research process to make us more innovative scholars or scientists. And with this, to increase the ability of researchers to create quality research and a systematic application of creativity in their own research development. Especially because emerging scholars and interdisciplinary researchers need tools, techniques, support, and inspiration to approach their research in an innovative and playful spirit of design.
 
Participants will explore a variety of design skills and mind-sets, but focus especially on how being mindful of your own research process, work styles, emotional state, and sometimes-hidden assumptions can help you get “unstuck” when facing research bumps in the road. The instructor seeks to help participants to explore potential solutions to problems in their research efforts.

Course outcomes

During this workshop, participants will gain…

Creative confidence

  • with tools, techniques and inspiration for an innovative mind-set
  • to improve their research process
  • to make themselves more innovative scholars
  • to become “unstuck" in times of research blocks

Problem-solving abilities

  • reflecting, iterating and tolerating ambiguity
  • refining questions, processes, and methods, viewing setbacks as opportunities for further learning
  • highlighting the creative process of scholarly research
  • combining analytical skills and creative intelligence

Emotional well-being

  • being proactive about emotional needs (as it leads to greater productivity)
  • creating a social-support network (academic, non-academic)
  • creative a supportive, non-judgmental environment
  • work in tandems and experience peer-coaching
Course material
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 25th of January. ​

Course format
Participants will present their prototypes and iterative developments from throughout the week and will present their research story in new presentation and storytelling formats such as Visual Storytelling. The Visual Storytelling Canvas will help participants to shape a story of the current research.
The workshop is characterized by a positive, intimate and encouraging atmosphere in which exchanging successful practices and failures (also known as “learning opportunities”) is central to the learning success of all participants. Therefore, the number of participants is kept small to enable meaningful exchanges.

  • The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles:
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching. 
  • ​You should allocate 6 - 7 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.
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​Presenters​
​Prof Catherine Comiskey (​Trinity College Dublin, Dublin University, Ireland)​)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 20th of January 2021
Course take place over the period 25- 29 January 2021
​Cost
​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600
​​Requirements
Participants should have an interest in, and a basic knowledge of quantitative research.  This course will be most beneficial to those who have a specific research project planned in the area of prevention or intervention within a real world, natural science, engineering, community, education, social or healthcare setting. 
The course will be interdisciplinary and will focus on practical examples and workshops where students can develop their own project work with hands on input from the facilitator.
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 20 - 29 January, while the hands-on instruction will take place on the 25 - 29 January 2021.
​Target audience

This course will be particularly suited to researchers who have decided they are undertaking a quantitative PhD in the natural, health, environmental, engineering or other related fields and who would like to learn more about the methods. We will learn of the origins of quantitative approaches, how to choose an appropriate study design and an adequate sample size. We will learn of the related data analysis from basic statistics to regression and beyond to ensuring the appropriate presentation and write up of quantitative results. You will be provided with a series of tools and checklists. There will also be an opportunity to expand your knowledge and learn of novel quantitative  approaches that may be useful for your PhD or future research, from  multiplier methods, to capture recapture methods and advanced modelling techniques.

This course will benefit those who plan to undertake a PhD or research study using quantitative methods.

The facilitator will directly respond to the needs of the participants and the stage they are at in their research careers.
​​
Course description

The following topics will be covered

  • The philosophical underpinnings of  quantitative research 
  • Choosing an appropriate quantitative study design from randomized control trials to  laboratory based experimental studies  to observational studies with plants, animals and people
  • Power analysis and identifying your key variable and choosing an appropriate sample size
  • Data collection methods and data types
  • Data analysis techniques for your data type, hypothesis testing correlation, t-tests, ANOVA, introduction to regression, Chi squared tests.
  • Considering novel quantitative approaches from multiplier methods and capture recapture techniques for prevalence estimation to modelling and simulation for decision making 
  • Writing a logical data analysis plan

Reporting on results and using writing guides (Consort guidelines and Strobe checklists)


Course outcomes
At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • Describe the philosophical underpinnings of quantitative research
  • Defend their choice of study design and sample size.
  • Conduct a power analysis and decide how many cases/participants are required within a study
  • Write an appropriate data analysis plan including a statistical plan for their study design
  • Write a report on their study in line with ​the Consort or Strobe guidelines
  • Summarise and critically analyse  related studies
  • Appreciate additional novel approaches and know where to access additional  resources for their studies

Course material
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 25th of January. ​

Course format
Participants will present their prototypes and iterative developments from throughout the week and will present their research story in new presentation and storytelling formats such as Visual Storytelling. The Visual Storytelling Canvas will help participants to shape a story of the current research.
The workshop is characterized by a positive, intimate and encouraging atmosphere in which exchanging successful practices and failures (also known as “learning opportunities”) is central to the learning success of all participants. Therefore, the number of participants is kept small to enable meaningful exchanges.

  • The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles:
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching. 
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and  "virtual office hour” consultations with Prof Comiskey in the afternoon.  
  • ​You should allocate 6 - 7 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.
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Course 9: Mixed Methods in research design

​Presenter ​Prof Tim Guetterman (University of Michigan & Stellenbosch University)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 5 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 20th of January
Course take place over the period 25 - 29 January
​Cost ​Early Bird Rate: R6 200
SU staff and students paying by OE code/student account, retain this price until bookings close.
Standard Rate: R6 600
​Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is critical to come with an idea for a research project and topic. We will refine and work on it throughout the course.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 20 - 29 January​, while the hands-on instruction will take place from 25 - 29 January 2021.
​Target audience
This course will benefit delegates who want to learn more about quantitative research design and methods. It is idea for students who are at the early phases of their PhD, who can actively develop their proposal through the course. Delegates planning a quantitative research study will benefit. The course is highly interdisciplinary, as is the instructor, and will use examples from the educational, social, and health sciences conducted across locations. 

Course description

This introductory course will teach participants when, how and why to integrate a qualitative and a quantitative research components into a single research project.
​Mixed methods research is an innovative and increasingly important way to conduct research in the social sciences. This research design integrates qualitative and quantitative components in a research study or very closely connected series of studies that inform one another. As a research approach, major value-added of mixed methods is to yield something more than the “sum” of the qualitative and quantitative parts through meaningful integration. The course places special emphasis the markers of scientifically rigorous mixed methods research to achieve integration. 

This workshop will be practical and delegates will have the opportunity to implement what they have learned as they progress through the course. We step through the features of rigorous mixed methods research that you can immediately apply to your research proposal, project, or manuscripts underway.

At the end of this workshop, delegates will

  • understand the principles of mixed methods research
  • be able to apply components of rigorous mixed methods studies,
  • identify the possibilities and limitations of mixed methods research
  • outline the basics of a mixed methods design with a design diagram appropriate for any specific purpose
  • have a concrete plan for integration of qualitative and quantitative research
  • draft a potential joint display to represent integration. 


The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on the 25th January 2021. 

  • The course will feature a blend of teaching and learning styles.
  • This course will be taught online, using a blend of asynchronous and synchronous teaching, as well as online live teaching. 
  • The course will start in the morning with asynchronous material (readings and work on own projects), followed by live class lectures and  "virtual office hour” consultations.
  • Delegates will be required to deliver a presentation during the workshop with slides (PowerPoint or other).
  • Prof Guetterman will give feedback on questions and submission.
  • ​You should allocate 6 - 7 hours for the day (excluding breaks) to the course so that you can sufficiently go through the materials and apply what you have learned or incorporate feedback from the lecturer.




 ​Presenter​Prof Catherine Comiskey (Trinity College Dublin, Dublin University, Ireland) Waiting list forming
​Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 28th of January 2021
Course takes place on Monday 1st February 2021
​Cost​Rate: R1 350
​Requirements
Participants should have an experimental or intervention study planned and should bring with them a copy of their proposed ethics application form  
The course will be interdisciplinary and will focus on practical examples and workshops where students can develop their own project work with hands on input from the facilitator.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 28 January - 1 February, while the hands-on instruction will take place on Monday 1st February 2021.
​Target audience
This course will benefit those who wish to undertake research within a range of real world settings and contexts, who wish to apply for ethical approval, ensure the quality of their data and understand the importance of research integrity in publication of findings.

Course description
The following topics will be covered
  • Review of  the origins of ethics
  • Ethical principles and responsibilities
  • Data Protection Acts
  • Levels of anonymity and confidentiality
  • Data storage, accessing and processing
  • Quality assurance
  • Types of consent
  • Access to participants and gate keeping
  • Service user engagement
  • Working with vulnerable populations
  • Working with children
  • Working in a range of settings
  • Completing an ethics application form
  • Planning ethical dissemination, feedback and implementation of results in publications, policy and practice.

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • ​Describe  the ethical principles and their origins
  • Have an awareness of the relevant data protection, data storage and sharing regulations
  • Be aware of how to obtain consent and work with gate keepers
  • Know how to work ethically with people who use services, vulnerable populations and children within a range of settings
  •  Complete an ethics application form
  • Plan appropriate dissemination and feedback to research participants.


The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on Monday 1st February 2021. 

Self-directed online lectures completed at your own speed, followed by real time, live and open online tutorial sessions for your questions  problem solving assistance group and individual presentations, exercises, and discussions. 
  • Please plan to allocate six to seven hours to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives. 


​​​​

Presenter​Dr Njeri Mwagiru & Ms Doris Viljoen (Institute for Futures Research, Stellenbosch University)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 2 days​ course work 
Orientation will be open from the 1st of February
Course takes place from Tuesday 2nd - Wednesday 3rd February 2021
​Cost​Rate: R2 700
​Requirements
No previous qualifications / knowledge required; just an interest in exploring possible long-term impacts and outcomes related to participants’ current research topics.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 1 - 3 February 2021 while the hands-on instruction will take place from Tuesday 2nd​ - Wednesday 3rd February 2021.
​Target audience
Researchers at any stage of their PhD journey wanting to gain insights into using scenarios to add an extra dimension to their research process.

Course description
The session will kick off with an overview of futures thinking and an introduction to core concepts in futures studies. Participants will gain an understanding of why futures thinking is important in research and praxis.

The session will then cover the basics of scenarios. Discussion points will centre on the value of scenario planning for, considering critical research issues and their interrelationships; highlighting knowledge blind-spots and areas of uncertainty; and anticipating possible outcomes of events and actions. Different approaches to scenario work will be shared, with practical examples demonstrating how scenarios have been applied in diverse contexts.

Group activities will also give participants an opportunity to put the theory into practice, with scenario exercises designed to support participant’s learning and research, both during and after the short course. ​Main take-aways will be an appreciation of futures thinking and a general understanding of how to apply scenario planning as a research method and tool.

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • Understand the basics of futures thinking
  • Have insight into the history and potential uses of scenarios  
  • Understand where scenario work could fit into a PhD study
  • Understand the steps to follow in a scenario process
  • Execute a scenario process by applying it to an issue of their own choice

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on Tuesday 2nd February 2021. 

  • The course will be offered as a fully online interactive course in the form of real-time webinar lectures, as well as structured group learning activities.
  • The course will run over two full days, and invites active engagement from participants in applying scenario planning as a method to enrich their research.
  • The facilitators will share core futures thinking and scenario planning concepts and lead interactive group discussions. Participants will also engage in small group exercises to practice using scenario planning tools.​
  • Delegates are expected to attend the full two days and participate in all course activities.





 ​PresenterProf Anthony (Tony) Onwuegbuzie (University of Cambridge, University of Johannesburg & University of South Africa) Waiting list forming
​Duration
1 day orientation + 2 days​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 1st of February 2021
Course takes place from Tuesday 2nd - Wednesday 3rd February 2021
​Cost​Rate: R2 700
​Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the process of research. It is essential that the delegates come to the course prepared to co-construct knowledge by contributing to the dialogue whenever possible.

Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 1st to 3rd February, while the hands-on instruction will take place from Tuesday 2nd - Wednesday 3rd February 2021.
​Target audience
This course will benefit delegates who want to learn the basics of academic writing. It will be particularly useful for students who are at the early phases of their Ph.D.s, who can use this course to develop or to improve their doctoral proposals. In addition, it will be useful for students who are writing their theses/dissertations, as well as postgraduate students who are planning to use their (completed) theses/dissertations to produce publishable manuscripts. Also, this course will be useful  for early career scholars/researchers and emergent scholars/researchers who are attempting to increase significantly the quality of their works, thereby making them more publishable. Finally, this course will be useful for instructors, supervisors, and mentors who would like to help students to write with discipline when writing empirical and non-empirical manuscripts. The course is highly interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and trans-disciplinary—consistent with the instructor, who will use provide guidance that transcends disciplines.
​What to bring?
Delegates will maximise the utility of the course if they bring an idea that is at least at the conceptualisation phase or the planning phase of a written work.

Course description
The purpose of this interactive two-day course is two-fold. The first purpose is to provide a meta-framework—comprising frameworks, models, heuristics, and exemplars— for writing empirical and non-empirical manuscripts with discipline. This interactive session, for graduate students, post-graduate students, and emergent researchers—as well as for instructors, supervisors, and mentors—will provide frameworks and heuristics for writing quality manuscripts. The instructor will provide published examples and provide exemplars of quality writing. 
The second purpose is to provide an array of publishing tips and approaches for applying evidence-based standards and guidelines when writing empirical and non-empirical manuscripts.

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • write a quality research paper
  • write a quality literature review
  • write up basic statistical findings
  • write up basic qualitative findings
  • write non-empirical (i.e., conceptual, theoretical, methodological) manuscripts
  • use visual displays to enhance the quality of writing
  • understand the role of computer-assisted software programs for enhancing the quality of writing
  • proof-read their own manuscripts and those of others
  • understand the standards and guidelines for publishing works

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on Tuesday 2nd to Wednesday 3rd February 2021. 

  • This course will involve a blend of online teaching and self-paced sessions. 
  • The online teaching will include the use of PowerPoint presentations to explain many of the key points. An array of writing resources will be given to each delegate. 
  • Please ​plan to allocate six to seven hours per day to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives.





 ​PresenterDr Lara Skelly (Stellenbosch University) Waiting list forming
​Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day​ course work
Orientation will be open from 3rd February 2021
Course takes place on Thursday 4th February 2021
​Cost​Rate: R1 350
​Requirements
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open from 3 - 4 February, while the hands-on instruction will take place on Thursday 4th February 2021.
​Target audience
This course is meant for post-graduate students who are looking to do a systematic review, or post-graduate students who are struggling to deal with enormous quantities of literature. It is particularly aimed at the social scientists, although all are welcome.

Course description

Creation of a research question, identification of constructs and appropriate keywords, advanced guidance on research databases, and introduction to Mendeley

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • conduct a systematic review and
  • use Mendeley to do so

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, videos, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on Thursday 4th February 2021. 

Self-directed online lectures completed at your own speed, followed by real time, live and open online tutorial sessions for your questions  problem solving assistance group and individual presentations, exercises, and discussions. 
  • Please plan to allocate six to seven hours to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives.



PresenterProf Catherine Comiskey (Trinity College Dublin, Dublin University, Ireland)
​Duration
1 day orientation + 1 day​ course work
Orientation will be open from the 4th of February 2021
Course takes place on Friday 5th February 2021
​Cost​Rate: R1 350
​Requirements
Participants should have an inte​rvention, process, practice or policy change planned. They should have a background knowledge of the setting within which this change is planned.  The course will be interdisciplinary and will focus on practical examples and workshops where students can develop their own project work with hands on input from the facilitator.  
Delegates are expected to log in before the course commences to ensure that they have access to the module online, and can access the different sections and materials needed for the course. The online module will be open fro4 - 5 February while the hands-on instruction will take place on Friday 5th February 2021.

​Target audience
This course will benefit those who wish to guide and evaluate the implementation of an intervention, practice change or new policy within a range of real world settings and contexts.  The course will be particularly useful to participants who are planning an intervention, a practice change or the introduction of a new service or policy in a real world setting.

Course description

The following topics will be covered

  • Introduction to the development of implementation science literature within change management, current terminology and definitions
  • Understanding and identifying the stages of implementation
  • Known enablers and barriers to successful  implementation
  • Implementation frameworks and tools from accessing readiness for change to scaling up and roll out.
  • Plan do study act improvement cycles
  • Identifying relevant evaluation data from varying perspectives, including manualised programmes, documentary analysis, visual content analysis and quantitative metrics.
  • Preparing your report with practical examples from a range of settings 

At the end of the course participants will be able to:

  • Describe implementation science principles and their origins
  • Understand the stages of the implementation process
  • Have an awareness of the frameworks and tools that can be used to guide your implementation
  • Identifying suitable data types from a programme manual, to meeting minutes, codes of governance, visual materials and metrics  and how to analyse them
  • Understand the role of plan do study act cycles
  • Prepare an implementation  evaluation report and identify the enablers and barriers to successful implementation

The course material includes PowerPoint slides, assigned readings, exercises, and other supplemental material.
The course materials will be made available online at the start of the course. However, delegates are required to do an online orientation and some tasks, before the course starts on Friday 5th February 2021. 

Self-directed online lectures completed at your own speed, followed by real time, live and open online tutorial sessions for your questions  problem solving assistance group and individual presentations, exercises, and discussions. 
  • Please plan to allocate six to seven hours per day to the course so that we can cover stated topics and meet the course objectives.




Course description

During this seminar, participants will learn key qualities of a vision and mission, understand the unique requirements of an academic vision (which includes theory building), imagine and create their own vision, identify key habits that are related to accomplishing an academic mission, and receive key strategies for how to overcome common obstacles to reaching one’s vision.


At the end of the seminar participants will be able to:

  • U​nderstand the key components of an academic vision, mission, and purpose
  • Identify an area of theory-building which will make their vision unique to pursuing an advanced degree
  • Implement key habits related to accomplishing their mission
  • Apply key strategies for time management and goal-setting


  • ​The module will take part synchronously and will include a mix of lecture, individual workshopping, and sharing in small groups.
  • A short ~15 minute break will be provided during the session