Bioinformatics
Welcome to Stellenbosch University

​​South African Tuberculosis Bioinformatics Initiative

Investigators

Gerard C. Tromp, Ph.D.

Professor Gerard Tromp was born in Johannesburg, attended Bryanston High School and then completed a BSc and a BSc (Hons) in Biochemistry at Potchefstroom University. He continued his studies at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Piscataway, New Jersey, USA and obtained his PhD in Biochemistry. Prior to joining Stellenbosch University in March 2015 as a Professor of Bioinformatics and Human Genetics, Gerard held faculty positions at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan, and at Geisinger Health System, in Danville, Pennsylvania, USA. Gerard has extensive experience in bioinformatics and computational analyses and has authored over 200 publications. At Stellenbosch University he is looking forward to participating in many collaborative research projects centered around the internationally renowned tuberculosis research programme and building up a bioinformatics programme for the Stellenbosch University Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.


Gian van der Spuy, M.Sc., Ph.D.

Professor Gian van der Spuy was born in Cape Town and, seeing no reason to leave one of the most beautiful cities in the world, remained there. He completed his undergraduate training at the University of Cape Town, majoring in Biochemistry and Microbiology, with a BSc. (hons) in Medical Biochemistry. He then moved to Stellenbosch University for a MSc. in Neurochemistry, after which he completed his PhD in Biomedical Sciences on the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. During his time as a PhD student he spent a few months at Stanford University on a fellowship acquiring new skills and ideas which resulted in an interest in computational data analysis. Since then he has broadened his research scope to include collaborations with groups working on the immunology and host genetics of TB, providing expertise and training in data management, bioinformatics and statistical data analysis. He has produced in excess of 80 publications and also authored a number of software packages, including a web-based Laboratory Information Management System for managing clinical research projects. With the establishment of the bioinformatics initiative, Prof. van der Spuy is looking to collaborate more widely in a variety of projects and train a new generation of researchers in much-needed analytical skills.


Elizna Maasdorp, M.B. Ch.B., M.Sc., Ph.D.