Psychology
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Vosloo couple invests in Chair in Afrikaans Language Practice at SUhttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=6909Vosloo couple invests in Chair in Afrikaans Language Practice at SUDevelopment & Alumni / Ontwikkeling & Alumni<p>​​​Ton Vosloo and Anet Pienaar-Vosloo, a couple with close ties to Stellenbosch University (SU), announced that from 2020 they will be sponsoring the Ton and Anet Vosloo Chair in Afrikaans Language Practice at SU for five years.<br></p><p>In addition to the Chair, funds are made available for bursaries for deserving students studying Afrikaans at postgraduate level at SU.</p><p>According to the Vosloo couple, the Chair is aimed at further developing Afrikaans as an important instrument in the service of the entire South African community.</p><p>Until 2015, Vosloo was in the industry for 59 years as a journalist, editor, CEO and chairperson of Naspers, and for the past three years, professor of journalism at SU. Pienaar-Vosloo, also a former journalist, is filming the third television series <em>Mooi </em>for the VIA TV channel. She is a Matie who studied fine art, and is well known for her role as co-founder and director of the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival, Aardklop and various other festivals across the country. She is also the first female chair of the Baxter Theatre in Cape Town.</p><p>Prof Wim de Villiers, Rector and Vice-Chancellor of SU, says the donation not only helps in maintaining Afrikaans as a medium of instruction, but also in promoting Afrikaans as a science and career language in a multilingual community. "As far as we know this is the first and only sponsored Chair in Afrikaans Language Practice at any university," he adds.</p><p>Prof Ilse Feinauer of the Department of Afrikaans and Dutch in SU's Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, has been appointed incumbent of this Chair. She has been teaching at the Department of Afrikaans and Dutch since 1982, and since 1996 has been involved in the postgraduate programme in translation, which has been expanded under her guidance from a postgraduate diploma in translation to a PhD in translation. She chaired the Department from 2005 to the end of 2008 and held the position of Vice Dean: Research of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences from 2015 to 2018. In 2013, Feinauer became the first woman to be promoted to professor of Afrikaans linguistics at SU, and in 2014, the Taiyuan University of Technology in Taiyuan, Shanxi (China), awarded her an honorary professorship in their Faculty of International Language and Culture.</p><p>“It is an incredible honour and privilege for me to be able to hold this Chair in Afrikaans Language Practice. All credit goes to Prof Wim de Villiers for laying the groundwork to make this Chair a reality in the Department of Afrikaans and Dutch."</p><p>According to Prof Feinauer, bursaries have already been awarded to four honours students, three master's students, two PhD students and one postdoctoral fellowship in Afrikaans and Dutch for 2020. “This Chair provides the Department with the opportunity to empower postgraduate students in particular to do research in and about Afrikaans in order to pursue a professional career after completing their studies in and through Afrikaans," she added.</p><p>When Ton Vosloo was asked why he and his wife came forward with the support of Afrikaans, he replied: “In my memoirs <em>Across Boundaries: A life in the media in a time of change</em>, published last year, I wrote a chapter entitled, 'Afrikaans in decline'. I made the point in the chapter that I hope gracious individuals would come forward who were concerned with the A to Z of Afrikaans.</p><p>“Anet and I have the grace that we can help. Afrikaans, as Jan Rabie put it, is our oxygen. Now is the time to step in further to develop this incredible source of knowledge for the sake of our nation's future. "</p><p>The Vosloos have been esteemed SU donors for some time.<br></p>
Top Psychology student wins coveted Chancellor’s Medalhttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=6160Top Psychology student wins coveted Chancellor’s MedalSandra Mulder/Corporate Communications Division<p>Dr Xanthe Dawn Hunt (27) from Pietermaritzburg in KwaZulu-Natal, who received the coveted Chancellor's Medal​ at SU's seventh graduation ceremony on Thursday (13 December), is described by academic​​​ staff at Stellenbosch University (SU) as “an academic phenomenon" and the “very finest student we have had in many years." This description corresponds with the admiration from world leaders in the field of disability studies at a recent international disability conference in Europe, who described her as a “genius."<br></p><div><img src="/english/PublishingImages/Lists/dualnews/My%20Items%20View/XantheHunt-3.jpg" alt="XantheHunt-3.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" style="margin:5px;width:400px;" /><span></span></div><p>​"I think it is very kind and generous. I have not seen myself as that way. I have seen myself as very hardworking and I always studies extremely hard," said Hunt shortly after the ceremony.<br></p><p>Hunt is the recipient of the coveted Chancellor's Medal that is awarded annually to a final year or postgraduate student who has not only excelled academically, but also contributed to campus life in various ways and worked hard at developing co-curricular attributes.​ At the same ceremony Hunt also received a PhD in Psychology. <br></p><p>She said the secret to her success is the fortunate position that she was in to have a lot of mentors, particularly towards the psychology side of my academic career.  "PhD's are always kind of the moment where you contribute something and first time in your career where you make something original, and it is build on the back of years and years of mentors, teachers and classes," she said.</p><p><br>With very little difficulty, Hunt already has some 30 academic publications to her name. This is more than many academics in Psychology have contributed in their entire careers, says Prof Awie Greeff, Chair of the Department of Psychology.<br></p><p>She is also the first Masters' student in the history of the Department whose degree was upgraded to a PhD.  <br></p><p>Another academic highlight was that during her PhD studies, she enrolled for a course in Biostatistics at Masters' level, despite not having completed Mathematics at matric level. Initially, the course convenor did not wish to admit her to the course for this reason, but later reluctantly agreed to accept her.  She completed the course <em>cum laude</em> and her results were the second best in the class.<br></p><p>"I didn't take maths at high school because it seemed not worth the push at that time. Stats are very visual. You use graphs and there is always a visual way of conceiving the statistic or theory behind it. And that kind of pulled me through if I can see what I was learning and if I could think of it in visual terms," she explained how she manages to pull her math through although she never had it before."​<br></p><p>Since  starting her studies at SU in 2010, Hunt won amongst others the SU Political Science Award for Excellence for Top Achieving First Year Student; the Department of English's Award for Excellence for Top Achieving First Year Student and the Rector's Award for Academic Excellence Top Faculty Achiever (on three occasions). She was also offered the prestigious Babette Taute English Scholarship.</p><p>Amazingly, Hunt passed <em>cum laude</em> in every single subject she took, with the exception of a single service module.  During the first five years of her studies, she achieved an average of 82.08%.</p><p>Her research spans disability studies, public health, monitoring and evaluation of early childhood interventions, and academic communication. She holds a Bachelor's degree in the Humanities, Honours degrees in Journalism and in Psychology, a Master's Degree in Biostatistics, and now a PhD in Psychology.<br></p><p>Hunt has worked with many members of the Department of Psychology over the course of her Honours, Master's and PhD degrees, primarily in the role of project assistant, but gradually formalising her role in the employ of one of the research units.<br></p><p>In her undergraduate years, Xanthe was part of her residence's <em>a cappella</em> choir and worked as a peer tutor both within her residence community and later beyond. She has also worked as a volunteer counsellor in community-based projects in the Stellenbosch and Franschhoek areas.</p><p>In addition to all her academic qualities, Hunt is exceptionally hard-working and a great team player.  Fellow students find her supportive, and she is very popular amongst the staff in her department.  She also regularly gives talks and lectures, and is an excellent communicator.<br></p><p>She has a contract for her PhD to be published as a book with Palgrave next year (2019).  She will present an exhibition from the PhD work at the Cape Town Holocaust Centre early in 2019.  </p><ul><li><strong>​Main photo</strong>: Dr Xanthe Hunt stands with the Rector, prof Wim de Villiers, who was in 1986 the first medical student at SU who received the Chancellor's Medal.<br></li><li><strong>Photo 1</strong>: Dr Xanthe Hunt receives the Chancellor's Medal<br></li><li><strong>Photographe</strong>r: Stefan Els​</li></ul>
SU lecturer wins prestigious international literary prize https://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=7933SU lecturer wins prestigious international literary prize Corporate Communication and Marketing/Korporatiewe Kommunikasie en Bemarking [Rozanne Engel]<p>​​​Dr Alfred Schaffer, a lecturer at Stellenbosch University (SU), recently became the youngest recipient of the PC Hooft prize, the most prestigious Dutch literary award, when he was announced the 2021 laureate.​</p><p>Schaffer, who is known as one of the most talented Dutch poets of his generation, received the prize for his poetry oeuvre.​</p><p>“The prize is a huge, huge honour and recognition, as well as something that feels totally unreal. It is the highest accolade one can receive as a writer, poet, or essayist in the Netherlands," says Schaffer.<br></p><p>The prize, which is named after the 17<sup>th</sup> century Dutch poet Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft, is awarded alternately each year to a Dutch writer of narrative prose, contemplative prose and poetry. The PC Hooft Prize is worth 60,000 euros, and will be awarded in May 2021.</p><p>Over the years, Schaffer has published numerous poetry and prose collections. These include <em>Zijn opkomst in de voorstad</em> (His Rise in the Suburbs; 2000); <em>Dwaalgasten</em> (Vagrants; 2002), which was nominated for the prestigious VSB poetry prize; <em>Geen hand voor ogen</em> (No Hands Before Your Eyes), <em>Schuim </em>(Foam; 2006); and <em>Kooi</em> (Cage; 2008). ​ Over the years, his work has also been translated into Afrikaans, English, French, German, Macedonian, Turkish, Indonesian and Swedish.​<br></p><p>He has also received the prestigious Jo Peters poetry prize, Hugues C Pernath prize, the Ida Gerhardt poetry prize and the Jan Campert prize for his work. <br></p><p>According to Schaffer, writing poetry means he has “absolute freedom" to express himself and sees it as a way to “creatively understand the world" around him.<br></p><p><img src="/english/PublishingImages/Lists/dualnews/My%20Items%20View/Alfred%20Schaffer.jpg" alt="Alfred Schaffer.jpg" style="margin:5px;width:300px;" /><br></p><p>“I am triggered by language, like every writer, but what inspires me as well, is the fact that there are so many things that I do not understand until I have creatively written about it. To write a poem is so wonderful because I do not know what the result will be. Poetry has no hypothesis, like life," says Schaffer.</p><p>Schaffer grew up in The Hague, Netherlands - the son of an Aruban mother and a Dutch father. ​​He studied Dutch Language and Literature, as well as Film and Theater Sciences in Leiden, Netherlands. In 1996, he moved to Cape Town to continue his postgraduate studies at the University of Cape Town. </p><p>He returned to the Netherlands in 2005 where he worked as an editor in Dutch publishing before moving back to South Africa in 2011. He currently works as a lecturer in the Department of Afrikaans and Dutch at SU.</p><p>Apart from producing his own poetry and prose, Schaffer has also made an important contribution to South African literature over the years by bringing local poetry to a broader audience through the translation into Dutch of, amongst other, Antjie Krog, Ronelda Kamfer and Koleka Putuma's work.</p><p>“Translation is everything. So many South African poets tell urgent stories of an intense life, right in the middle of the big issues of our time: migration, neo-colonialism, racism, guilt. I hope that readers see that there are many different stories, experiences and perspectives out there, formulated in wonderful and confronting poetry," says Schaffer.<br></p><p>Apart from his lecturing duties at SU, Schaffer is also currently working together with fellow academics in Belgium and the Netherlands on a book about lyrical activism and he is busy with the Dutch translation of <span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;font-family:calibri, sans-serif;">Kamfer’s latest volume of poetry<em>, </em></span><em></em><em>Chinatown</em>.<br></p><p>The last time someone with a strong South African connection won the PC Hooft prize was in 1991 when it w​as awarded to Elisabeth Eybers for her oeuvre of Afrikaans poetry. ​<br></p>
Kruger Trust honours Dr Elbie Adendorff https://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=7935Kruger Trust honours Dr Elbie Adendorff Lynne Rippenaar-Moses<p>​​Dr Elbie Adendorff, a senior lecturer in Language Acquisition in the Afrikaans and Dutch Department at Stellenbosch University (SU), is the recipient of the very first award from the Kruger Trust, specifically in the category Scientific Practice in Afrikaans.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">This honour is bestowed annually on a person or institution playing an essential role in attaining the goals of the Trust. Every year a different category is selected for possible funding. The Kruger Trust is a trust body which aims to protect and promote the Afrikaans language and Afrikaans culture without giving preference to any race, gender or religion.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">“The advisory committee, consisting of academics of various South Africa universities, was unanimous in its recommendation that the award be made to Dr Adendorff," explained Prof Rufus Gouw, convener of the advisory committee and a professor in Lexicography and Afrikaans Linguistics at SU.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">According to Gouws the advisory committee based its support mainly on two aspects:</p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Dr Adendorff's tuition of Afrikaans as foreign and second language and her scientific practice in Afrikaans in this regard.</li><li>Her work in the expansion and promotion of public speaking and debating in Afrikaans and her role as judge of Afrikaans public speaking and debating competitions where students learn how to use Afrikaans as debating and public speaking language.</li></ul><p style="text-align:justify;">Adendorff said she felt “incredibly humbled and privileged to receive the award for Scientific Practice in Afrikaans" and was thankful to the Department for the continued support she has received to promote Afrikaans Acquisition not only as tuition subject, but also as research field.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">“I appreciate being honoured in this way for what I consider my passion: to work with non-Afrikaans-speaking students and to encourage a love of Afrikaans in them, and to teach Afrikaans students the methodology of language acquisition so that they can apply it in tuition situations in future," said Adendorff.<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">“This passion also allows me to accompany my postgraduate students on their research journey so that they can expand and promote Afrikaans; to write articles about and in Afrikaans to promote the language; to deliver papers in English at international conferences and congresses about my tuition and research in Afrikaans; and lastly to promote Afrikaans among the youth through my involvement with public speaking and debating."<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">According to Gouws, since her appointment in the Department, Adendorff has not only focused on expanding Afrikaans Language Acquisition as a fully-fledged subject in its own right to provide for tuition of second language and foreign language students of Afrikaans, but she has also built capacity among senior students of Afrikaans and Dutch to teach their mother tongue as foreign language.<br></p><p style="text-align:justify;">In addition, she has also helped to establish Afrikaans Language Acquisition as a full research field and is acknowledged nationally and internationally for her contribution to this field.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">“Through her publications, congress participation and supervision of various master's and doctoral students in the theory of Language Acquisition she has helped to further grow this form of scientific practice in Afrikaans. She practices her science mostly in Afrikaans and once again proves that Afrikaans has the theoretical and terminological apparatus available to practice it as a scientific discipline."</p><p style="text-align:justify;">Dr Adendorff is also actively involved as presenter of Afrikaans courses in public speaking and debating at all levels – primary school, high school and at universities.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">“Through her involvement in this activity, Dr Adendorff demonstrates to learners how a cultural and scientific activity can be applied in Afrikaans," Gouws added.<br></p>
Never too old: 2nd doctorate for Prof Leslie Swartzhttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=7930Never too old: 2nd doctorate for Prof Leslie SwartzCorporate Communication & Marketing / Korporatiewe Kommunikasie & Bemarking [Alec Basson]<p>Obtaining a doctoral degree is a remarkable achievement. But to be awarded a second one is quite something special. This is exactly what Prof Leslie Swartz, a distinguished Professor of Psychology at Stellenbosch University (SU), accomplished when he received another PhD, this time in English Studies, on Monday 14 December 2020 during SU's December graduation week, exactly thirty years after obtaining his first PhD. <br></p><p>At the same ceremony, one of Swartz's students, Maura Lappeman, also obtained a doctorate. A second doctoral student, Hildah Oburu, who missed her graduation in April due to COVID-19, was also present to accept her certificate. They are among the more than 40 doctoral candidates that he has supervised over the years.<br></p><p>Swartz has already scooped numerous prestigious awards for his outstanding contributions to the fields of mental health and disability studies. He says that his second PhD shows that nobody is too old or too well qualified to learn more and to grow academically, and that through life, everybody can benefit from the help and care from others (in this case, his supervisors).<img src="/english/PublishingImages/Lists/dualnews/My%20Items%20View/how-i-lost-my-mother_05b%20(002).jpg" alt="how-i-lost-my-mother_05b (002).jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" style="margin:5px;width:246px;height:369px;" /><br></p><p>Much of Swartz's work in mental health and disability studies focusses on issues of care. His doctorate comprises a memoir, <em>How I Lost My Mother</em>, which discusses care issues in an accessible and entertaining way, and a reflective essay on the memoir and process of writing. “Care is central to how society is organised and especially relevant to an ageing society and one affected by a pandemic," says Swartz. “Despite this, care is often made invisible or not spoken about, hence the need for a book like this," he adds.<br></p><p>The memoir is a story of an emotionally complex relationship between mother and son, and of the struggles we all face in negotiating our way between closeness and distance, tenderness, anger and retribution. The book uses humour and story-telling to discuss issues which may otherwise not be palatable to a wide range of readers.<br></p><p>“Many privileged people throughout the world live their lives, and go through the process of dying, supported by vulnerable and poorly-paid people (usually women of colour), and the book discusses the politics of this reality," says Swartz. “There is no other text I know of which deals as directly with the intertwining of emotional intimacy and exploitation of care workers in the context of debility and dying."<br></p><p>According to his supervisors from SU's English Department, Prof Shaun Viljoen and Prof Louise Green, the memoir emphasises how personal narratives can help us communicate complex social concerns. <br></p><p>Swartz says he hopes that by engaging in an emotional journey through personal and social history, readers will make up their own minds about how they feel about the issues he raises.<br></p><p><em>How I Lost My Mother</em> is his second memoir, after <em>Able-Bodied: Scenes from a Curious Life</em> (2010) that chronicles his relationship with his disabled father, and introduces readers to key concepts in disability studies. <em>How I Lost My Mother</em> is due to be published by Wits University Press in March 2021.​<br></p><p><br></p>
SU academics visits Malawi to host writing workshophttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=4480SU academics visits Malawi to host writing workshopCorporate Marketing/Korporatiewe Bemarking<p>​There is a commonly-cited adage in academia, "publish or perish". Although an exaggeration, the phrase encapsulates a reality of contemporary research: publishing one's research – particularly in journals – is a cornerstone of a successful career. Further, as money, time, and effort go into conducting research, it is the responsibility of the academic to ensure that as many people as possible find out about what this work reveals.</p><p>Being published, however, is easier said than done: writers' block, submission deadlines, and challenging peer-reviews are but a few of the hurdles which lead papers-in-the-making to falter and fade away. In countries only recently beginning to contribute to the international academy, the ill-effects of these barriers are amplified. To ensure that global Southern views and news can enter the global academic space, there is an urgent need to cultivate understanding around publishing on the continent. </p><p>This October, Professor Leslie Swartz of the Psychology Department, and Masters student Xanthe Hunt, visited Zomba, Malawi, to address just such a need.  The visit was funded partly by the Doctoral Capacity Development Programme at the African Doctoral Academy (ADA) at Stellenbosch University International, and was conducted under the auspices of the partnership agreement between Stellenbosch University and University of Malawi</p><p>A two-and-a-half day writing workshop was convened by Swartz, in collaboration with Professor Blessings Chinsinga of the Centre for Social Research at University of Malawi, and Professor Alister Munthali, and was attended by 14 academics from various departments at the University of Malawi. The group consisted of early career researchers, as well as seasoned academics, and had representatives from numerous fields, including political science, theology, library and information sciences, and anthropology.  Prof Chiwoza Bandawe, outgoing editor of the Malawi Medical Journal, and former Head of the Department of Mental Health at University of Malawi was also in attendance on the final day.</p><p>The first day saw Swartz, who is on the editorial board of a number of prominent academic publications and is the editor in chief of the African Journal of Disability, introduce the group to the principles and purpose of academic publishing. This was followed by an interactive afternoon session, during which Swartz and Hunt worked with the attendees on their own.</p><p>Swartz, who has been conducting such trainings in South Africa and other African countries for some years highlighted the importance of working with attendees on their own manuscripts during such trainings.  </p><p>"The best learning in this context comes from engagement with the actual experience of writing and especially in dealing with reviewer comments, which are often phrased in dismissive and unflattering terms.  Sharing struggles around writing, using actual examples, helps to minimize anxiety and avoidance of the process," explained Swartz.  </p><p>Swartz also noted that emphasizing interaction – and asking attendees to determine their own priorities for writing workshops – ensures that the sessions are relevant, and make the most of the time available. </p><p>In line with this, the second day involved a presentation by Hunt on the mechanics of writing a manuscript, which was followed by a feedback session from the group. They requested that the remaining time be allocated to a "crash course" on thematic analysis (TA). TA is widely employed in the social sciences as a qualitative research methodology, and involves analysing textual data (words from research subjects, in the form of interview transcripts, for instance). The course then concluded on the third day with a research methods session by Hunt, who is currently employing TA within her thesis. </p><p>Research methods are the building blocks from which good research is built; good writing puts polish on the finished product, and helps to ensure its dissemination. </p><p>"In the future, it will be important for workshops such as this one to incorporate day-long sessions on every step of the research process, <em>as well as</em> the presentation process," said Hunt, adding that short workshops are important in order to stimulate discussion around priority areas for future workshops. </p><p>The Malawian contingent have expressed their interest in a second, more detailed workshop, and Swartz says that he is optimistic about the prospect of piloting such an expanded agenda in Malawi.</p><p>"The quality of the research being conducted here is high," he concluded, "and I look forward to a continued collaboration with this engaged and engaging group."</p>
SU alumnus wows audienceshttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=3419SU alumnus wows audiencesWayne Muller<p>An alumnus of Stellenbosch University (SU), the actor Marlo Minnaar, will perform in the acclaimed one-man show, <em>Santa Gamka</em>, in the Baxter Theater in Rondebosch, Cape Town, from Monday, 1 February.</p><p>The piece is based on Eben Venter's novel by the same name, and Minnaar reworked it into a theatre play himself. He is also the producer.</p><p><em>Santa Gamka</em> received the Kanna Awards for Best Debut Work, the Herrie Prize for Best Ground-breaking Work and for Best Director (Jaco Bouwer) at the 2015 Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (KKNK). </p><p>Marlo Minnaar was also nominated for Best Actor for his performance as Lucky Marais. The production also received three KykNET Fiësta nominations – for Best Solo Performance, Best Newly-created Afrikaans Production, and Best Director. (Winners will be announced in February.)</p><p>In recent years Minnaar was seen in productions such as <em>Blood Brothers</em>, <em>Balbesit</em> and <em>Die Kortstondige Raklewe van Anastasia W.</em> </p><p><em>Santa Gamka</em> tells the story of a young coloured man from the Karoo, who navigates his way through life in a rather unusual way. Driven by his fear not to fall back into poverty, he becomes a rent boy.</p><p>Lucky tells the audience about his seven greatest adventures – better known as his seven customers: a woman who lost her son in a car accident, the mistress of the local hotel owner and olive farmer, his high school English teacher, the municipal manager, the farmer and his father's employer who continues to oppress Lucky's parents, his aunt, as well as a young German man.</p><p>However, his white lies start catching up with him and he finds himself in a furnace of hell. Suddenly the Karoo has become too hot for him. His time is up. He only has seven minutes left to live and he is now faced with the dilemma of having to review his short life.</p><ul><li><em>Santa Gamka</em> is performed in Afrikaans in the Baxter Theatre's Golden Arrow Studio from 1 to 19 February at 20:15 daily.</li></ul>
PhD candidate's first poetry collection publishedhttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=4102PhD candidate's first poetry collection publishedLynne Rippenaar-Moses<p style="text-align:justify;">The first poetry manuscript to be penned by Ms Sindiswa Busuku-Mathese, a doctoral candidate of the Graduate School of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Stellenbosch University, has been published by Botsotso. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">Busuku-Mathese, who is originally from Durban North in Durban, is currently completing her first year of PhD studies in the English Department via a three-year, full-time scholarship offered by the Graduate School. She is being supervised by Prof Sally-Ann Murray, an academic and poet whose work she says she has greatly admired. </p><p style="text-align:justify;"><em>Loud and Yellow Laughter, </em>says Busuku-Mathese, is a personal reflection on childhood. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">"There exists a tension between truth-telling and truth-testing in the poetry."</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The poems in the collection are woven together with archival materials such as letters, photographs, scraps of conversations recorded verbatim and found notes. Busuku-Mathese also uses dramatic techniques such as character lists and stage directions, highlighting the texts' re-enactment of pre-existing events between the main characters: The Mother, The Father and The Girl Child. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">As the adopted daughter of a man from Yorkshire, Britain and the biological daughter of a woman from Mt. Fletcher, Eastern Cape, her childhood was anything but normal if measured against traditional standards. Her poetry collection is also a creative memorial to her adoptive father, she says, who passed when she was only 13 years old. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">"The poetry collection looks at family and intergenerational discussions about parenting and childhood in South Africa, as well as topics of adoption and (un)belonging, and generational slippages that arise within families," she explains. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">"It is linked to my own background and very personal."</p><p style="text-align:justify;">By delving into her mother's and father's pasts and growth of their relationship – a parenting relationship between two friends – Busuku-Mathese explores her own identity as a South African through her writings by mixing auto/biography, elegy and documentary collage to explore the intersections between history and fiction. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">"My parents were two friends who decided to co-parent a child. It definitely did not reflect the relationships I saw between the parents of my own friends, who were involved in romantic relationships and parented their children in those relationships. That being said, I am writing about fragments of several lives over four generational lines, it's a multi-voiced meditation on loss and hope – a renegotiation and sometimes even a reversioning of history. There is a slipperiness to the collection, a kind of zigzaging between the person and the persona, a conflation between history, memory, myth and documentary, all woven together in the poems, which is important to remain aware of," she says. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">The manuscript for her collection, she explains, developed from the poetry work included in her MA thesis in Creative Writing, which was supervised by acclaimed South African poet Prof Kobus Moolman at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Before being published, her work was also circulated in local poetry journals like <em>New Coin</em>, <em>New Contrast</em>, <em>Prufrock</em>, <em>Ons Klyntji </em>and <em>Aerodrome</em>. In 2015, it was shortlisted for the prestigious Sol Plaatje European Union Poetry Award and Busuku-Mathese was selected as runner-up for the Award. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">In 2016, Botsotso decided to publish her poetry – a major feat considering that unsolicited submissions from unknown poets and writers are often ignored. </p><p style="text-align:justify;">"I won't lie and say it was easy. What I experienced is that there is a strong resistance to new poets and often the response that you will encounter from most poetry publishers is that unsolicited manuscripts are not welcome. It's a frequent response and it can be frustrating when the few poetry publishers we have in this country will not look at new material from new poets, so when Botsotso said yes to my unsolicited publication, it was very exciting. While it is even more difficult to get poetry work published, I do believe that the more unsolicited work is accepted for review, the more publishers will start discovering interesting poetry that may have been overlooked because of exclusionary thinking."</p><p style="text-align:justify;">Her work, she hopes, will contribute to discussions around various forms of identity in South Africa and help introduce alternative narratives and voices in that space, making them more visible.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">"Issues of identity are real and personal, I think it is an important discussion to have in this country in particular considering how diverse our country is and how varied our experiences are of what it means to be South African. That is a conversation that I believe we are still grappling with and watching unfold as South Africans as we are pulled in different directions. My poetry explores what it means to be brought up in a home that is not stereotypical and to be young and struggling with the liminal space between two parents who represent radically different worlds." </p><p style="text-align:justify;">The collection however does not treat the alternative to traditional family structures as abnormal or as a spectacle.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">"That was always my intention, to present an alternative to the traditional and a view of a different form of parenting and not to make it seem different. The collection affirms that normal is not always traditional and that there are different distinctions of that. At the end of the day, it is my hope that my collection contributes to conversations about our various forms of South Africanness."</p><p style="text-align:justify;">If you are interested in purchasing a copy of <em>Loud and Yellow Laughter</em> at R80, you can contact Botsotso at <a href="mailto:botsotso@artslink.co.za">botsotso@artslink.co.za</a> or Busuku-Mathese at <a href="mailto:sindi.busuku@gmail.com">sindi.busuku@gmail.com</a>. </p><p style="text-align:justify;"><em>Photo: Ms Sindi-Busuku-Mathese with her first poetry collection, </em>Loud and Yellow Laughter, <em>which was recently published by Botsotso. (Anton Jordaan, SSFD)</em></p>
Language implementation in the 2nd termhttps://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=3730Language implementation in the 2nd termProf Johan Hattingh<p>​​Dear Student in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences</p><p>I am thoroughly aware of the uncertainty created by the language interdict of Afriforum, which requires  us to strictly apply  the language specifications of the 2016 Yearbook from 29 March. What happens now to the principle that no student should be excluded on the basis of language? To address this uncertainty I would like to convey the following to you about the language practice that you can expect from 29 March in your classes. </p><p>There are two main points of departure that the Faculty will follow from 29 March, the first of which is demanded by the interdict: </p><ul><li>As of 29 March 2016 we have to strictly adhere  to the language specifications of the 2016 Yearbook (Afriforum court interdict, and the SU Council requirement not to reduce the Afrikaans offering).</li><li><span style="line-height:1.6;">SU wants  to be 100% accessible to st</span><span style="line-height:1.6;">udents that are not academically literate in Afrikaans and therefore all module content covered  in lectures will  also be available in English (SU Council resolution supporting  an increase of the English offering to 100%).</span></li></ul><p><strong>In practice this will entail the following:</strong></p><ul><li><span style="line-height:1.6;">​</span><span style="line-height:1.6;">​</span><span style="line-height:1.6;">Most Departments  will return to the conventional T-modules, with the proviso that this will be implemented with the utmost circumspection to ensure that no student is excluded on the basis of language of tuition. You will be informed at the beginning of the term and at the beginning of lectures about this intention and the two points of departure mentioned above, and also about what exactly will be done in each module in order to implement these points of departure.</span></li><li><span style="line-height:1.6;"></span><span style="line-height:1.6;">In order to ensure that all lectures are at least available in English, and that Afrikaans is available as specified in the 2016 Yearbook (50% or more), some Departments will provide extra lectures in Afrikaans and/or English.</span></li><li><span style="line-height:1.6;"></span><span style="line-height:1.6;">In cases where lecturers are only proficient in English, Departments will provide interpretation in Afrikaans, and/or extra lectures in Afrikaans.</span></li></ul><p></p><p>​​Until such time as the Language Policy and Plan of the University  is  officially changed, we will have to live with these arrangements.  I will depend on your understanding and cooperation to help implement the abovementioned arrangements  with dignity and respect. </p><p>I hope this letter will help allay any uncertainty, but if you have any further questions, please send an e-mail to Tanja Malan (tanja@sun.ac.za), who will convey it to me.<br><br>Kind regards</p><p>Johan Hattingh<br> Dean, 24 March 2016</p>
Alumnus investigates "challenges in journalism education and training"https://www.sun.ac.za/english/Lists/news/DispForm.aspx?ID=3491Alumnus investigates "challenges in journalism education and training"Lynne Rippenaar-Moses<p>​Dr Bevelyn Dube graduated with a PhD degree in Journalism from Stellenbosch University (SU) in December 2013. Prior to receiving her degree, she presented some of the research contained in her thesis at the 3rd World Journalism Education Congress (WJEC) in Belgium. Her paper, which focused on Transformation of journalism education and training in post-1994 South Africa: The challenges, was selected as the runner-up for the best paper presented at the conference. Lynne Rippenaar-Moses spoke to her about her research and the contribution it will make to scholarship in South Africa. ​​<br></p><div><p><strong>​QUESTION:</strong> Could you tell me what you currently do and why you decided to pursue a PhD in Journalism at Stellenbosch University?</p><p><strong>ANSWER:</strong> I am currently a lecturer in the Department of Communication and Applied Language Studies at the University of Venda, in Thohoyandou, Limpopo Province. I chose to do my PhD in Journalism with Stellenbosch University because of the excellent reputation they have of producing quality journalism graduates. The department's keen interest on journalism curricula issues also persuaded me to choose Stellenbosch as my own interests lay in that direction.</p><p><strong>Q:</strong> How did it feel to be selected as the runner-up for the best paper at the Belgium conference?</p><p><strong>A:</strong> When my name was called out, I was stunned and humbled at the same time. It is only after I had actually been handed the prize and the certificate that the whole thing sank in. I must admit that I never expected to be selected for the any of the three prizes that were on offer; after all, over 100 papers were submitted at the congress. Besides, there were so many seasoned journalism scholars, and truly speaking, I did not even dream that I would be honoured in this way. I must admit that I would not have done all this without my wonderful supervisor, Professor Lizette Rabe. We have come from far, and when I look at the first draft of my PhD proposal, I wonder why she did not tell me to forget it. My growth academically and this award are all because of her. Thank you Lizette, You are a true role model.</p><p><strong>Q:</strong> What drove you to focus on a topic such as the Transformation of journalism education and training curricula in post-1994 South Africa: The challenges, specifically for the Belgium conference?</p><p><strong>A: </strong>Firstly, I was guided by the theme of the conference, "Renewing Journalism through Education", to focus on this specific aspect of my thesis. Secondly, despite the general consensus amongst journalism education and training (JE&T) scholars in South Africa that JE&T curricula should be transformed to meet the needs of a transforming South Africa, no significant change has taken place. My PhD study revealed several challenges that JE&T institutions in South Africa faced, challenges which made it very difficult for them to transform their curricula. I felt that these findings would generate scholarly debate as the challenge of transforming JE&T programmes is not peculiar to South Africa.</p><p><strong>Q: </strong>One of the conclusions your thesis, entitled Challenges for journalism education and training in a transforming society: A case study of three selected institutions in post-1994 South Africa, reaches is that "despite the subject of transforming JE&T curricula in South Africa being topical since 1994, no significant change has taken place and that these curricula continue to be underpinned by Western epistemologies and thought." Could you elaborate on this?</p><p><strong>A:</strong> It is no secret that most JE&T scholars in South Africa, as seen in the many conferences and colloquia, as well as the papers written on the subject of JE&T transformation, are not happy with the fact that JE&T curricula in South Africa are rooted on Western epistemologies, which put a lot of emphasis on observable and measurable facts and individualism. Scholarship in the Western context is viewed as scientific and detached from social concerns. Journalists educated in this tradition would be expected to be neutral and objective in their reporting. Whilst not completely dismissing Western epistemologies, South African JE&E scholars are almost all in agreement that these epistemologies are ill-suited to meet the needs of a transforming South Africa.</p><p>Knowing this and acting on it are, however, two different things. To de-Westernise the curricula, there is need to move away from Western-produced towards knowledge which is underpinned by African philosophies and thought. But what we currently have are programmes which rely heavily on Western-produced textbooks, especially textbooks from the USA. To compound the problem, South African JE&T educators, who are supposed to de-Westernise the curricula are themselves Western educated. This is a catch 22 situation. Africa in general and South Africa in particular still do not have the capacity to produce the knowledge which would lead to the de-Westernisation of the programme</p><p>We have to understand that transforming the JE&T curricula is never going to be easy, but it has to be done. I believe the first step towards transforming the curricula is to hold a series of workshops to discuss and come up with a possible model curriculum for JE&T schools in South Africa. The model can be adjusted to meet the needs of the individual localities. Curriculum development is a process, hence the need for a series of workshops. It is high time that South African journalism scholars acted on their convictions.</p><p>To de-Westernise the curricula, I would also suggest that South Africa JE&T scholars embark on an aggressive training programme in which potential researchers can be identified among journalism students. An investment in these young researchers can enrich South African journalism scholarship.<br></p><p><strong>Q: </strong>What contribution will your research make to scholarship surrounding this topic in South Africa or the rest of Africa and even the world?</p><p><strong>A: </strong>Firstly, existing literature shows that there are no studies on JE&T curricula in South Africa. None of the studies done since 1994 have made an attempt to show how a transforming South Africa is reflected in JE&T curricula. Most of the studies done in South Africa have focused on journalism practice in the media industry. This study, has, therefore, made a significant contribution to journalism scholarship in South Africa.<br><br>Secondly, the discourse of JE&T has largely been theoretical and commentary. This study, therefore, has contributed to knowledge on JE&T in South Africa by adding empirical findings to test transformation and blended this with theory. Its findings, though not generalisable to all JE&T institutions in South Africa, indicate the challenges that these tertiary institutions face in their endeavours to transform their curricula.</p><p>Thirdly, the study exposed the shortcomings of JE&T programmes at three universities examined with respect to their specific programmes and their contributions in a transforming country.</p><p>It has also has raised questions which have opened up new avenues for further study.</p><p><strong>Q: </strong>Finally, what advice would you give to journalists or even academics wishing to pursue a doctoral degree?</p><p>My advice is that more PhD students in the field of JE&T should carry out research on journalism education in South Africa. Transformation of JE&T in South Africa will not take place unless there is a concerted effort from JE&T scholars to research extensively on journalism curricula. I recommend Stellenbosch University because I believe it is one of the best in the field of JE&T in South Africa.</p></div>