Philosophy
Welkom by Universiteit Stellenbosch

Publikasies

 

 

Du Toit, Louise 2014. Human rights discourse: friend or foe of African women’s sexual freedoms? Du Toit, Louise 2014. Human rights discourse: friend or foe of African women’s sexual freedoms? 2015-07-07T08:16:52ZArticle available in Acta Academica Vol. 46, No.4, pp.49 – 70.
Van Niekerk, AA. 2014. Moral perspectives on covert research,Van Niekerk, AA. 2014. Moral perspectives on covert research,2015-07-07T08:17:59ZThe South African Journal of Bioethics and Law, 7 (2): 55-58. The term ‘covert research’ refers to research on human subjects for which informed consent is not, and, allegedly, cannot, be solicited – not because of wilful negligence or the deliberate transgression of research ethics guidelines on the part of the researcher(s), but because the revelation of the nature of the research to the involved research participants would necessarily invalidate the research results. Whilst covert research is thus deemed necessary in a number of sciences, such as ethnography, such research nevertheless elicits major ethical concern due to the fact that it seemingly violates the values of respect for autonomy and the protection of research subjects – values that have, since the first formulations of the Nuremberg Code, the Belmont Declaration and the series of Helsinki Accords, become almost axiomatic in our understanding of the basic tenets of responsible and ethical research on human subjects. In this paper, I contend that whilst subject autonomy is a pivotal value in morally legitimate research generally, there is more to morally legitimate research than informed consent. I conclude by formulating a few guidelines for the identification of circumstances under which covert research might, and might not, be morally in order.
Van Niekerk, AA. 2014. Three ethical issues in the development of public genetic health policies in Africa Van Niekerk, AA. 2014. Three ethical issues in the development of public genetic health policies in Africa 2015-07-26T18:34:49ZThe Journal of AIDS and Clinical Research, 5, (12). It is of paramount importance that sensible and prudent public policies for the introduction and management of genetic research, technologies and therapies be adopted for countries on the African continent. The author agrees with Buchanan et al. when they claim that it is “unwise to consider the ethics of genetics only at the individual level. What matters is not merely the ethics of the individual scientist, physician or counsellor, but the broader questions of justice, of claims for freedom and for protection from harm, and our obligations towards future generations” (Buchanan et al. 2000). What is therefore important, is the development of a “public and institutional policy on genetics” (Ibid.) that is adopted for the needs of, specifically, the people of Africa. The author delineates three such issues, and indicates some moral aspects that accompany their understanding as well as the challenges that they pose. The three issues are: (i) The kinds of genetic technologies that are appropriate for African needs, (ii) The lessons about public health policy to be learned from (especially South African) policymakers’ appropriation of scientific expertise, (iii) Concerns about informed consent of patients and the competence of health care professionals in administering appropriate genetic remedies in African societies.