Centre for Teaching and Learning
Welcome to Stellenbosch University

Teaching portfolios

 

Teaching portfolios are relevant in Higher Education. Teaching and learning is core business for an academic. It is therefore important to track your professional learning in this area as well as your research and innovation of classroom practice, post-graduate student performances and develop your teaching philosophy over time. One-on-one consultations, workshops and SoTL presentations are available to academics wishing to create their teaching portfolios.
 

DESCRIPTION OF PORTFOLIOS

Excellent portfolio

The portfolio makes a convincing case for excellence in that the academic/academic team has reflected on multiple aspects of their context, including their students, their institution and their discipline/programme. The portfolio clearly describes the teaching and provides an explanation of why the applicant adopts the approach that s/he does (teaching philosophy). Teaching methods used are contextually nuanced and are aligned to the stated philosophy. Robust and diverse evidence has been provided for the claims made in the portfolio. The academic/academic team is constantly looking for ways of improving and can reflect on growth over time and in response to changing contexts or new understandings. The academic/academic team has had a positive institutional, national or international impact on teaching in higher education. The portfolio demonstrates excellence in teaching that can serve as an inspiration or can deepen our understanding of this crucial aspect of higher education.

Noteworthy portfolio

The portfolio makes a case for excellence in that the academic/academic team has reflected on aspects of their context, including their students, their institution and their discipline/programme. The portfolio describes the teaching and provides an explanation of why the applicant adopts the approach that s/he does (teaching philosophy). Teaching methods used are adapted to context and aligned to the stated philosophy. Evidence has been provided for the claims made in the portfolio. The academic/academic team looks for ways of improving and can reflect on growth over time. The academic/academic team has had a positive impact on teaching in higher education beyond their classroom. The portfolio demonstrates excellence in teaching that can promote better practice and encourage others.

Developing portfolio

The portfolio begins to construct a case for excellence in that the academic/academic team has reflected on aspects of context. The portfolio describes the teaching and provides an explanation of why the applicant adopts the approach that s/he does (teaching philosophy). Teaching methods used are adapted to context but perhaps not very well aligned to philosophy (or vice versa). While evidence has been provided for some of the claims made in the portfolio, some claims are not substantiated. The academic/academic team looks for ways of improving. The academic/academic team has had a positive impact on teaching. The portfolio demonstrates the development of excellence in teaching.

Evidence of excellent teaching could include but is not restricted to the following:

  • Information about the applicant and the applicant's teaching context (position in the institution, part/ full time, discipline taught, size of classes, teaching context e.g. main/ satellite campus, areas of key challenge);
  • Peer feedback;
  • Student feedback;
  • Student retention rates;
  • Student success data;
  • Artefacts such as brief extracts from study guides, multimedia, online materials, innovative student assessment, photographs. 

The evidence should demonstrate in what ways the applicant's teaching stands out from that of other good teachers. 

Evidence of the lecturer's involvement with teaching and learning that has a broader impact within the university and beyond could include but is not restricted to the following: 

  • Papers presented on the subject of teaching and learning at conferences;
  • Articles or other publications on teaching and learning (citations or abstracts only);
  • Membership of professional associations to which the applicant is a significant contributor based on evidence of conference attendance, papers presented, review activities, membership of SIGs or of the executive;
  • Moderation of exams and dissertations/theses;
  • Names of university committees and national or international committees and evidence of the applicant's contribution;
  • List of formal and non-formal continuing professional development;
  • List of students or staff mentored or supervised;
  • List of awards received (where relevant).