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Teaching and learning patient-centredness in an undergraduate medical curriculum
Start: 26/09/2017, 12:45
End: 26/09/2017, 13:45
Contact:Nothemba Nqayi - 021 808 3717
Location: Den Bosch, 41 Victoria Street (opposite House Skuilhoek and directly behind the Conservatoire)

Teaching and learning patient-centredness in an undergraduate medical curriculum

Presenter: Dr Elize Archer from the Centre for Health Professions Education, Manager: Simulation and Clinical Skills Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences

Patient-centredness has been identified by most medical schools as a desired core competence. However, there seems to be a focus on the biomedical aspects of patients in the practice and theory of teaching and learning in undergraduate medical curricula; therefore, students tend to focus on the disease of their patients. The expectation that doctors should be patient-centred has caused medical curriculum planners worldwide to pay attention to aspects such as communication skills training, including subjects from the humanities and placements of students in longitudinal clerkships. Despite some of these initiatives, medical students often still display a lack of patient-centredness when they graduate. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the factors that influence the learning of patient-centredness in one institution.

An explorative programmatic case study design, rooted in an interpretive knowledge paradigm, was considered most appropriate for the study in which final-year medical students and lecturers participated.

The findings revealed that the following factors play a role in students' learning about patient-centredness: background characteristics of students and lecturers, attitudinal factors, acquired skills and knowledge, subjective norms, student self-efficacy, assessment of learning, and the environment or context within which patient-centredness is taught and learnt. Assessment is recognised as an important factor that drives student learning, and the lack of assessment of patient-centredness in many departments renders a message strongly favouring the biomedical component of patient care.

With an improved understanding of enablers and disablers in this process it is acknowledged that such learning is about more than positive attitudes of students and providing them with communication skills training. This study emphasises a need for a jointly planned and well-coordinated approach to the formal, informal and hidden curriculum spaces within a programme with well-trained clinician teachers who understand the importance and application of patient-centredness in modern medical practice.

When: Tuesday, 26 September 2017 from 12:45 to 13:45 (“padkos" will be provided)

Where: Den Bosch, 41 Victoria Street (opposite House Skuilhoek and directly behind the Conservatoire)

There are only 15 places available. Please contact Nothemba Nqayi at nothemban@sun.ac.za or 021 808 3717 to reserve your place.

 

[A podcast will be available on the CTL website after the session:  www.sun.ac.za/ctl ]